PipeChat Digest #2168 - Monday, June 25, 2001
 
Melbourne Town Hall Organ
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Nativity of St. John Baptist - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA USA  (X-p
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Need Music
  by "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net>
Melbourne Town Hall Organ
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
The Beginning: OHS North Carolina - 6/21/01
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Melbourne Town Hall Organ From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2001 19:46:11 +0800   Well, my CD of Thomas Heywood on the rebuilt MTH organ arrived. I am disappointed at the sound. Too much mixture, and little impact from the big reeds. Warmth of tone characteristic of the period seems to have gone completely. Of course, it is only a recording but it seems to confirm what I have been told by others who have heard the organ live. Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: Nativity of St. John Baptist - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA USA (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2001 06:51:28 -0700   Sung Mass at 10:30 a.m. (no High Mass until after Labor Day ... choir in recess)   Voluntaries   The Good Shepherd - Benoit Fidelis servus - Benoit Elevation - Benoit Jubilate Deo - Benoit   Setting - Willan / Scottish Chant   Hymns   On Jordan's Bank the Baptist's Cry - Winchester New Hark! A Thrilling Voice Is Sounding - Merton O Lamb of God, Still Keep Me - St. Christopher The King Shall Come When Morning Dawns - St. Stephen   One more Evensong on Tuesday, then VACATION for a MONTH! (grin)   Cheers,   Bud-By-The-Beach    
(back) Subject: Need Music From: "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net> Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2001 12:30:16 -0400   Hello, List: Does anyone have a copy of the music "Precious Memories"? I need this music as quickly as possible. I am very much aware of copyright considerations, but if anyone out there has this music.....................could he or she please FAX to: 252-537-2975? This music needed for a funeral mass tomorrow, June 25; and the family has requested this music be played, and I have not heard of it before. Many, Many Thanks......... -Jane Hanudel  
(back) Subject: Melbourne Town Hall Organ From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2001 22:29:20 -0400   Hi List,   Did I read somewhere that the consultant for this project was Jack Bethards ? Can someone confirm this as true or false?   HD    
(back) Subject: The Beginning: OHS North Carolina - 6/21/01 From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2001 23:26:20 EDT     --part1_86.ba57a94.2868095c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   Dear Lists and Friends,   This is the first of several review/postings chronicling the activities of yet another great Organ Historical Society Convention. These articles will appear in a few month's time in The Diapason, with appropriate photographs, as did last year's articles about the 2000 Boston Convention. Again this year, I hope the power of the Internet and its denizens will provide answers to questions that my arise from time to time - perhaps more information about an obscure composer, an historical question about an organbuilder, a question about the history of a par- ticular instrument, or, Heaven forfend, even a correction! Before print publication, new material from others will be incorporated into the narratives, and proper attribution will be given, unless anonymity is requested.   Here beginneth the 46th annual convention of the OHS, and the "here" is, in this case, North Carolina, centering around Winston-Salem. I drove down from Connecticut with two friends, Dan Hopkins from Nova Scotia (an E. Power Biggs Fellow at last year's convention) and Dave McPeak from Boston, travel companions good and true. We arrived at the convention hotel at around 5 p.m. today (6/21), in time to register for the convention and into the hotel. Convention registration brings with it the fabulous Organ Handbook, with recital programs, organ specifications and photographs, and bios and photos of performers. It's the Bible for the week, eagerly devoured, and kept in one's library forever. As last year, the editor this year was Jonathan Ambrosino.   We were gently shepherded onto buses at 6:45, for the opening concert at First Presbyterian Church in Greensboro, the absolutely perfect convention opening on several levels. The building is stunningly beautiful, designed by Hobart Upjohn, modeled on the cathedral at Albi in France, and somehow built in 1929 and 1930, in the height of the Great Depression. It was able to accommodate the entire convention, not the case with quite a few buildings we will visit later in the week, when we will often be divided into smaller groups. The organ, finished by Letourneau just last year, fills the 1400 seat building with great clarity and power. It is a grand creation, with large instruments in both gallery and chancel, beautifully encased. The acoustic of the building is organ-friendly, but nothing more. Having chancel pipes on both sides and a large gallery division placed very high up gives the instrument a great presence. There is a very effective <en chamade> reed atop the gallery division. I am almost tired of hearing myself say this, but I'll bite the bullet and say it anyway - the whole enterprise is undergirded by digital 32s, not obnoxious all of the time, but often enough. Bruce Stevens, to vastly understate, always gives good value, and is always for me a main attraction at these conventions, both because of how he plays and because of what he plays. He is usually tucked off in a balcony somewhere, heard but not seen. I know words abound on the subject of whether seeing the player matters or not, particularly in situations where closed circuit TV is used. I am always happy to see the player by whatever means, and in this recital, I found it instructive, with the console placed front and center. Bruce is a stylish player. There is a grace and elegance in what he does at the keyboard, this including his thoughtful registrations. What I guess I had not seen before is his splendid efficiency. There is little or no motion, while torrents of notes are flying everywhere. The program:   Johann Kasper Kerll (1627-1693) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Passacaglia in D Minor. = This made for a good opening work, introducing us to the clarity of the instru- ment's choruses and other combination possibilities, through a=3D20 great variety of variations, small and large, loud and soft, building to a quite sturdy ending.   Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Adagio in FMajor (Organ = Sonata 8)=3D .. When I first discovered, as a student, that there were some organ bits by Beethoven, I became rather excited, and babbled on about this to Walter Blodgett, in whose Cleveland choir I was then singing. He knew all about this music, and his comment was that the fact that the music exists is of far more interest than the music itself. I would now, having heard the above work last night, respectfully disagree just a little, enough to want to hear it again. There is substance in this work, with clear traces of the piano sonatas, and much that is lovely, all aided by Bruce's pleasantly limpid Flute registration.   Somewhere, at every recital of an OHS Convention, a hymn gets sung, mostly meant to show us the effectiveness of the organ as an accompanimental instrument, but the custom has taken on a life of its own. There is even a special hymnal printed, especially attractively this year. The recitalist gets to choose the hymn, and to accompany it with as much or as little freedom as wanted. We in the pews get to sing "with the spirit and the understanding also." This is a phenomenon oft commented upon in convention recollections, and understandably so. My, you should have heard us last night! The hymn; "I will give thanks with my whole heart" - tune: <Herr Jesu Christ> sung in glorious harmony, and supported magnificently by Bruce.   Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Organ Sonata No.8 = =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Introduc=3D tion =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Passacaglia. Bruce is perhaps that person most credited with keeping the Rheinberger lamp brightly lighted these days. His Raven recordings are well-known. This man's music is not heard as much as it might - a real meat-and-potatoes, virile, alternative to the works of Mendelssohn, which I love, but which seem to get all the attention in music of the period. Tom Murray is another Rheinberger player, and I know there are more out there, but it is unusual to see the name on recital programs. This sonata is glorious, and both the player and the organ did it complete justice. The huge power of the Pedal, some of it achieved by illicit means (I would personally prefer a good Resultant), gave the ending particular force.   Cesar Franck (1822-1890) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Choral No. 2 in BMinor, perhaps = the most noble of the three, although I would not want to have to defend that statement, and another demonstration of the Passacaglia as an enduring form. The tempo seemed a bit brisk, but, I thought, perfectly apt for the acoustic. I had a feeling that nuance was elusive with these Swell engines. There were some rather abrupt changes that made me wonder if the old Moller shades and motors had been retained. I am not sure, but it sounded like that unlamented system was in operation, and I know it was not anything to do with the artist on the bench. A favorite critic phrase, "a towering performance," applies here!   After the Franck, Bruce was joined by the splendid Marcella Leonard, Flutist, in a performance of The Hedding Suite by Everett Titcomb (1884-1968). There are four movements. The wonderful Allegro, fairly thick of texture, with lots of notes, wanted to swamp the Flute occasionally, but was mostly kept at bay. The <alla menuetto> was a real charmer, and the <andante cantabile> was gorgeous, and the "charming" word has to come out again for the final Scherzo, with a bit of Zimbelstern thrown in for good measure. Who knew about this other side of Titcomb, who taught at New England Conservatory, and spent 50 years at St. John the Evangelist in Boston? This is wonderful "world-class" music, which could bring=3D20 non-organist friends to the organ under certain circumstances. Abundant thanks to Bruce for bringing it to our attention, and to both players for such an eloquent performance.   Franz Liszt (1811-1886) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H. This = was a totally splendid performance, virtuosic in the extreme, registered without fear! The <en chamade> player in the back row finally got to spit out his gum, put away the comic book, and begin to play, and play he did. One might not think of it often, or at all, but this work is a great memorial and tribute to J. S. Bach, and some of what we heard tonight, e.g. Rheinberger and Franck, clearly=3D20 showed the influence of the great Cantor. The Liszt was a glorious ending to a great recital, and a promising beginning for the week to come. I'm ready!   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com =3D20       --part1_86.ba57a94.2868095c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>Dear Lists and = Friends, <BR> <BR>This is the first of several review/postings chronicling the = activities <BR>of yet another great Organ Historical Society Convention. These = articles <BR>will appear in a few month's time in The Diapason, with appropriate <BR>photographs, as did last year's articles about the 2000 Boston <BR>Convention. Again this year, I hope the power of the Internet and its <BR>denizens will provide answers to questions that my arise from time to <BR>time - perhaps more information about an obscure composer, an = historical <BR>question about an organbuilder, a question about the history of a par- <BR>ticular instrument, or, Heaven forfend, even a correction! Before = print <BR>publication, new material from others will be incorporated into the <BR>narratives, and proper attribution will be given, unless anonymity is <BR>requested. <BR> <BR>Here beginneth the 46th annual convention of the OHS, and the "here" <BR>is, in this case, North Carolina, centering around Winston-Salem. I <BR>drove down from Connecticut with two friends, Dan Hopkins from Nova <BR>Scotia (an E. Power Biggs Fellow at last year's convention) and Dave <BR>McPeak from Boston, travel companions good and true. We arrived at <BR>the convention hotel at around 5 p.m. today (6/21), in time to = register <BR>for the convention and into the hotel. Convention registration brings <BR>with it the fabulous Organ Handbook, with recital programs, organ <BR>specifications and photographs, and bios and photos of performers. <BR>It's the Bible for the week, eagerly devoured, and kept in one's = library <BR>forever. As last year, the editor this year was Jonathan Ambrosino. <BR> <BR>We were gently shepherded onto buses at 6:45, for the opening <BR>concert at First Presbyterian Church in Greensboro, the absolutely <BR>perfect convention opening on several levels. The building is = stunningly <BR>beautiful, designed by Hobart Upjohn, modeled on the cathedral at Albi <BR>in France, and somehow built in 1929 and 1930, in the height of the <BR>Great Depression. It was able to accommodate the entire convention, <BR>not the case with quite a few buildings we will visit later in the = week, <BR>when we will often be divided into smaller groups. The organ, finished <BR>by Letourneau just last year, fills the 1400 seat building with great <BR>clarity and power. It is a grand creation, with large instruments in <BR>both gallery and chancel, beautifully encased. The acoustic of the <BR>building is organ-friendly, but nothing more. Having chancel pipes on <BR>both sides and a large gallery division placed very high up gives the <BR>instrument a great presence. There is a very effective &lt;en = chamade&gt=3D ; <BR>reed atop the gallery division. I am almost tired of hearing myself = say <BR>this, but I'll bite the bullet and say it anyway - the whole = enterprise <BR>is undergirded by digital 32s, not obnoxious all of the time, but = often <BR>enough. Bruce Stevens, to vastly understate, always gives good value, <BR>and is always for me a main attraction at these conventions, both <BR>because of how he plays and because of what he plays. He is usually <BR>tucked off in a balcony somewhere, heard but not seen. I know words <BR>abound on the subject of whether seeing the player matters or not, <BR>particularly in situations where closed circuit TV is used. I am always <BR>happy to see the player by whatever means, and in this recital, I <BR>found it instructive, with the console placed front and center. Bruce = is <BR>a stylish player. There is a grace and elegance in what he does at <BR>the keyboard, this including his thoughtful registrations. What I = guess <BR>I had not seen before is his splendid efficiency. There is little or = no <BR>motion, while torrents of notes are flying everywhere. The program: <BR> <BR>Johann Kasper Kerll (1627-1693) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Passacaglia in D = Minor. This m=3D ade <BR>for a good opening work, introducing us to the clarity of the instru- <BR>ment's choruses and other combination possibilities, through a=3D20 <BR>great variety of variations, small and large, loud and soft, building <BR>to a quite sturdy ending. <BR> <BR>Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Adagio in FMajor = (Organ Sonat=3D a 8). <BR>When I first discovered, as a student, that there were some organ bits <BR>by Beethoven, I became rather excited, and babbled on about this to <BR>Walter Blodgett, in whose Cleveland choir I was then singing. He knew <BR>all about this music, and his comment was that the fact that the music <BR>exists is of far more interest than the music itself. I would now, = havin=3D g <BR>heard the above work last night, respectfully disagree just a little, <BR>enough to want to hear it again. There is substance in this work, with <BR>clear traces of the piano sonatas, and much that is lovely, all aided <BR>by Bruce's pleasantly limpid Flute registration. <BR> <BR>Somewhere, at every recital of an OHS Convention, a hymn gets sung, <BR>mostly meant to show us the effectiveness of the organ as an <BR>accompanimental instrument, but the custom has taken on a life of <BR>its own. There is even a special hymnal printed, especially = attractively <BR>this year. The recitalist gets to choose the hymn, and to accompany <BR>it with as much or as little freedom as wanted. We in the pews get to <BR>sing "with the spirit and the understanding also." This is a = phenomenon <BR>oft commented upon in convention recollections, and understandably <BR>so. My, you should have heard us last night! The hymn; "I will give <BR>thanks with my whole heart" - tune: &lt;Herr Jesu Christ&gt; sung in <BR>glorious harmony, and supported magnificently by Bruce. <BR> <BR>Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Organ Sonata No.8 = =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Intr=3D oduction =3DE2=3D80=3D93 <BR>Passacaglia. Bruce is perhaps that person most credited with keeping <BR>the Rheinberger lamp brightly lighted these days. His Raven recordings <BR>are well-known. This man's music is not heard as much as it might - <BR>a real meat-and-potatoes, virile, alternative to the works of <BR>Mendelssohn, which I love, but which seem to get all the attention <BR>in music of the period. Tom Murray is another Rheinberger player, <BR>and I know there are more out there, but it is unusual to see the name <BR>on recital programs. This sonata is glorious, and both the player and <BR>the organ did it complete justice. The huge power of the Pedal, some <BR>of it achieved by illicit means (I would personally prefer a good <BR>Resultant), gave the ending particular force. <BR> <BR>Cesar Franck (1822-1890) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Choral No. 2 in BMinor, = perhaps the m=3D ost <BR>noble of the three, although I would not want to have to defend that <BR>statement, and another demonstration of the Passacaglia as an <BR>enduring form. The tempo seemed a bit brisk, but, I thought, perfectly <BR>apt for the acoustic. I had a feeling that nuance was elusive with <BR>these Swell engines. There were some rather abrupt changes that <BR>made me wonder if the old Moller shades and motors had been retained. <BR>I am not sure, but it sounded like that unlamented system was in <BR>operation, and I know it was not anything to do with the artist on the <BR>bench. A favorite critic phrase, "a towering performance," applies = here! <BR> <BR>After the Franck, Bruce was joined by the splendid Marcella Leonard, <BR>Flutist, in a performance of The Hedding Suite by Everett Titcomb <BR>(1884-1968). There are four movements. The wonderful Allegro, fairly <BR>thick of texture, with lots of notes, wanted to swamp the Flute <BR>occasionally, but was mostly kept at bay. The &lt;alla menuetto&gt; <BR>was a real charmer, and the &lt;andante cantabile&gt; was gorgeous, <BR>and the "charming" word has to come out again for the final <BR>Scherzo, with a bit of Zimbelstern thrown in for good measure. Who <BR>knew about this other side of Titcomb, who taught at New England <BR>Conservatory, and spent 50 years at St. John the Evangelist in <BR>Boston? This is wonderful "world-class" music, which could bring=3D20 <BR>non-organist friends to the organ under certain circumstances. <BR>Abundant thanks to Bruce for bringing it to our attention, and to <BR>both players for such an eloquent performance. <BR> <BR>Franz Liszt (1811-1886) =3DE2=3D80=3D93 Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H. = This was <BR>a totally splendid performance, virtuosic in the extreme, registered <BR>without fear! The &lt;en chamade&gt; player in the back row finally = got <BR>to spit out his gum, put away the comic book, and begin to play, <BR>and play he did. One might not think of it often, or at all, but this <BR>work is a great memorial and tribute to J. S. Bach, and some of <BR>what we heard tonight, e.g. Rheinberger and Franck, clearly=3D20 <BR>showed the influence of the great Cantor. The Liszt was a glorious <BR>ending to a great recital, and a promising beginning for the week <BR>to come. I'm ready! <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler <BR>www.mander-organs.com <BR> &nbsp; <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_86.ba57a94.2868095c_boundary--