PipeChat Digest #1852 - Saturday, March 3, 2001
 
Re: Meistersinger
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
OHS Convention Open to Public
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: Meistersinger + B. Durden
  by "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
Re: Trem
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Nicholas" <nickgood@ix.netcom.com>
Re: Meistersinger
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
ORGANS IN MADRID AND BARCELONA
  by <Rbjrsnow@aol.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Trem
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Postludes
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
RE: Pedaling and Other Things
  by "Matt Steinkraus" <hat77@operamail.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Estey Organ Info
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Estey Organ Info
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Severance Concert Ticket-cross posted
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Trem
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Rueckpositiv divisions in Germany
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Meistersinger From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 03:31:16 -0800 (PST)   Yes, there are a couple of transcriptions of this work, the most famous and successful ine by Edwin H. Lemare. JW --- Innkawgneeto@cs.com wrote: > Is the Prelude to Act I of Meistersinger transcribed > for organ? I heard it > today on radio and thought, once again, how > wonderful it would be on our > instrument. > > Also, can someone remind me of Brenda Durden's > webpage? > > Thanks, > Neil Brown > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: OHS Convention Open to Public From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 08:02:40 -0500   "Shirley" asks: "Are any of the concerts open to the public?"   Yes, often the evening recitals are open to the public and the determining factor is the availability of space. Of course, we always encourage members of congregations to attend all OHS recitals.   Please consider registering for a few days, too, so you can enjoy one of the real treats of an OHS convention: that is meeting and being with a group of like-minded people whom you will enjoy meeting and travelling with as we move from recital-to-recital-to-lunch-to-recital-to-recital-to-dinner-to-recital-to-h= otel-to-reception (and then to sleep).   Bill  
(back) Subject: Re: Meistersinger + B. Durden From: "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 08:55:30 -0500   Good morning, Neil and Pipechatters,   > On Sat, 3 Mar 2001 00:19:57 EST Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes: > Also, can someone remind me of Brenda Durden's webpage? > Neil Brown   Brenda Durden =3D The Frantic Organist. QED, her webpage is http://www.franticorganist.com   Cheers to all on a rainy morning in the Hudson Valley of New York which along with New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania may be hit by another Nor'easter (blizzard) Sunday night - Tuesday....   Pat Maimone Organist/Director of Musical Activities, Post Chapel 692 Biddle Loop West Point, NY 10996-1390 III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller/Gress-Miles ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Re: Trem From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 09:58:13 EST   In a message dated 3/2/01 7:49:49 PM EST, lmelby@prtel.com writes:   > What would the effect on the operation of the trem be with > a 2 inch pipe? Would the trem be a little milder? > Would it make any difference at all? > The smaller diameter pipe will restrict the volume of air that the trem = will dump, and could make the trem stop working. depending on which type of tremulant was put on the organ there are ways to regulate the speed and = depth of your tremulant. there is/should be a regulating valve that controls the =   volume of air being admited to the box, and by changing that amount of air-flow and re-balancing the springs (or pneumatic valve settings) it = should be possible to get the effect uyou want. depending on the installation and =   the length of pipe from the regulator to the trem you will find that it = takes a lot of experimenting to get the 'optimum' results...BE PATIENT.   Rick Maryman Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Nicholas" <nickgood@ix.netcom.com> Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2001 20:52:30 -0600   .... Get the "Method of Organ Playing" by > Harold Gleason. The exercises will drive you nuts, but it will = definitely > improve your pedal technique and manual dexterity as well! > > John     Another resourse is A System of Technical Studies in Pedal PLaying for the Organ L. Nilson published by G. Schirmer.     When I studied organ for 3 semesters at U of Illinois in the 70's all = the beginning students used this. It has good diagrams and text as well as boring but = effective exercises. I never graduated to the parts where you play parallel chromatic thirds :) But it did very quickly establish technique = that is useful for most of the stuff you would ever need for service playing, = and most of the baroque literature.    
(back) Subject: Re: Meistersinger From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 10:03:26 EST   In a message dated 3/3/01 0:21:02 AM EST, Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes:   > > Is the Prelude to Act I of Meistersinger transcribed for organ? I = heard > it > today on radio and thought, once again, how wonderful it would be on = our > instrument. > > Also, can someone remind me of Brenda Durden's webpage? > YES. It was transcribed by Edwin H Lemare...Published (in Europe ) by Schott = and has been republished by Editions Leupold in the US about 10 years ago. = there is also a shortened version in the Mayhew (or is it Oxford?) Music book = for weddings which was transcribed by a British organist.   Brenda is at Franticorganist.com   Rick M  
(back) Subject: ORGANS IN MADRID AND BARCELONA From: <Rbjrsnow@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 10:22:18 EST   I will be in each of these cities on a Sunday in March and would = appreciate suggestions of where I might hear a good organ. Gracias - RSB, NYC  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 10:31:26 EST   Hi Matt:   There are differences in pedal technique which depend wholly on the type of pedalboard at your disposal. 32 note AGO style (Willis) pedalboards require a heel toe approach. The technique and Art of Playing the Organ by Harold Gleason is the most definitive work on this subject. He was the organist that began the Eastman School of music, Catherine Crozier's late husband. Get the book, do the exercises, and you can't go wrong!   Toe to toe playing was for flat non radiating early European pedalboards. it can still be employed on an AGO pedalboard, but why go to this extra trouble when toe to heel is so much more fluid.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Trem From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 10:52:30 EST   Hi List:   Trems on a Vox Humana were actually used by one builder in the US. The fact that there wasn't one didn't matter. He used 40' of flexhast from the reservoir to the Vox unit. Everytime the stop was drawn there was a steady fast trem. Was it on purpose? I have no idea, I just know it occurred on at least one organ many years ago. Don't ask me which one, as that was many years ago too! :)   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Postludes From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 11:15:51 EST   In a message dated 2/28/01 4:25:00 AM Central Standard Time, mhummel@pcug.org.au writes:   << I guess its not appropriate to use full organ in the postlude? <g> Then people would have to continue their converstations outdoors. >>   True, but it's fun to make them yell ;-). And I never, NEVER use full = organ anytime during Lent (Sundays in Lent included) until Easter has arrived.   John  
(back) Subject: RE: Pedaling and Other Things From: "Matt Steinkraus" <hat77@operamail.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 13:26:19 -0500   As a response to the earlier responses to my question. The Organ book I = have is the Gleason, which is the reason for my initial trepidation. = Fortunately I got it for 10 bucks of of ebay already, but I'm not quite to the point to start using it. I guess running the pedal scales would be a good idea...   Matt   ------------------------------------------- The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at http://www.opera.com/download/ -------------------------------------------    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 10:43:08 -0800   I disagree, Ron (grin).   The MAIN reason for using toes-only is ARTICULATION.   Example: it's POSSIBLE to play the six-part double-pedal Aus tiefer Not of Bach ALMOST legato, BUT ... the cantus firmus is in the upper voice of the double pedal (the right foot) ... if it's played LEGATO with heel and toe, = it DISAPPEARS in the thick texture ... if you play it marcato with all toes, = as Bach would have HAD to do on a short, flat pedal-board, then the cantus firmus stands out in bold relief.   Another FINE example is the final pedal cadenza in the Bach D Major Fugue = ... virtually the ONLY way to get the sixteenth notes EVEN and ARTICULATE is = to play it with alternate toes only. It's MORE work to get the phrasing and articulation right with heels and toes, since the tendency is to play adjacent notes with heel and toe LEGATO, rather than detached.   It's important to remember that the Willis-Wesley pedalboard AND the = heel-toe technique BOTH developed in the ROMANTIC period, when LEGATO organ-playing became the norm.   Legato organ-playing was NOT the norm prior to that, as a study of the = 17th and 18th century theoretical writings will reveal ... it was basically the invention of Lemmons and the Franco-Flemish school of organ-playing that = he founded, and virtually all the 19th and early 20th century organ methods picked it up ... Lemmons' own method, Stainer, the Germans, Dupre, etc.   Curiously, in France and Germany they APPLIED it to FLAT pedal-boards, = which is VERY difficult with heels and toes (grin).   The same holds true of reviving historical fingerings ... they FORCE the correct articulation in the manuals. True, it's less difficult to = reproduce the articulations with modern fingerings, but one should EXPERIENCE the = other in order to see what the original articulations WOULD have been, and THEN reproduce them with modern fingering, if one so chooses.   I've had an interesting experience since I had the stroke last Spring ... = my left leg was affected, and one of the things I can't do is put my left = heel down with any accuracy. That has FORCED me to go back to toes-only = pedalling, which works just fine (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Matt: > > There are differences in pedal technique which depend wholly on the type > of pedalboard at your disposal. 32 note AGO style (Willis) pedalboards > require a heel toe approach. The technique and Art of Playing the Organ > by Harold Gleason is the most definitive work on this subject. He was > the organist that began the Eastman School of music, Catherine Crozier's > late husband. Get the book, do the exercises, and you can't go wrong! > > Toe to toe playing was for flat non radiating early European = pedalboards. > it can still be employed on an AGO pedalboard, but why go to this extra > trouble when toe to heel is so much more fluid. > > Regards, > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Estey Organ Info From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 15:08:42 -0500   "Mike Gettelman" wrote:   I am trying to assemble a collection of information and history on the Estey Pipe Organ Co. particularly concerning opus 2775 built in 1928. I may soon own this instrument, and am eager to learn all about it, and it's history.   Thanks Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 12:22:24 -0800   At 08:52 PM 3/2/2001 -0600, you wrote: >Another resourse is > A System of Technical Studies in Pedal PLaying for the Organ > L. Nilson published by G. Schirmer.<snip>   Indeed. These are the two best resources out there. Some might offer the =   old "The Organ", by John Stainer, but it's pretty weak in many spots, and was stolen by Hammond after the copyrights expires to use for their organ instruction books.   Note that this is NOT Leslie Neilsen, in which case the book would have been entitled, "Leslie Neilsen's Stupid Little Pedalling Book". <snarf = snarf>   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 14:41:57 -0600   Another Book which will drive you NUTs in "A System of Technical Studies = in PEDAL PLAYING for the organ" by L> Nilson...published by G. Schirmer. I purchased it several years ago through Carl Fischer so I imagine it is still in print.....I'm about half way through it...and if you don't enjoy aching legs maybe he won't want it...it really gives you a work out....and =   has some very good heel and toe work/     Jons    
(back) Subject: Re: Estey Organ Info From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 15:13:17 -0600   HI Mike, I own Estey opus 290 and here is what you do for information: Brattleboro Historical Society 230 Main St. Bx. 1286 Brattleboro, VT. 05302. Also speak with John N. Carnahan, Ph. 802-258-2363 He is in charge of the records of the com. Hope this helps. Sincerely, Gary Black ----- Original Message ----- From: mike <mike3247@earthlink.net> To: Pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2001 2:08 PM Subject: Estey Organ Info     > "Mike Gettelman" wrote: > > I am trying to assemble a collection of information and history on > the Estey Pipe Organ Co. particularly concerning opus 2775 built in > 1928. I may soon own this instrument, and am eager to learn all about > it, and it's history. > > Thanks > Mike > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 17:52:19 EST   Hi Bud:   It's ok to disagree, but I think you've been working too hard on your Hammond/Suzuki lately. If memory serves me the Hammond has a flat pedal board, so toes may work better on it. :) A new organist in MHO should learn the norm of the MODERN 32 note Pedalboard.   Therefore my recommendation for the Gleason still stands at the beginning of the 21st Century. :) I doubt if the flat pedalboard will make a = comeback anytime soon as the keyboard of choice. It's nice to have a few museum pieces lying around here and there to remind us, but I wouldn't want to return to it! <GRIN>   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 15:14:10 -0800   Nope, Le Grand Hammond has a 32-note AGO board (grin) ... its ONLY = redeeming feature.   I grew up on flat pedalboards; I don't have any trouble going back and = forth; but for some reason people who learn exclusively on radiating seem to have = a problem switching.   I don't agree that flat pedalboards are museum-pieces, or not likely to = make a return ... they already HAVE ... I'd hate to be deprived of the pleasure = of playing some very MAJOR organs (both in this country and abroad) simply because I couldn't play a flat pedalboard ... if anything, it's the AGO = console standards that are going the way of all flesh (grin). I may never climb to = the organ tribune at St. Sulpice in Paris, but if I DO, I want to be able to = play the pedals (grin).   And my comments on their effect on pedal ARTICULATION *definitely* stand (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Bud: > > It's ok to disagree, but I think you've been working too hard on your > Hammond/Suzuki lately. If memory serves me the Hammond has > a flat pedal board, so toes may work better on it. :) A new organist > in MHO should learn the norm of the MODERN 32 note Pedalboard. > > Therefore my recommendation for the Gleason still stands at the = beginning > of the 21st Century. :) I doubt if the flat pedalboard will make a = comeback > anytime soon as the keyboard of choice. It's nice to have a few museum > pieces lying around here and there to remind us, but I wouldn't want to > return to it! <GRIN> > > Regards, > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 15:54:57 -0800   At 05:52 PM 3/3/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Hi Bud: > >It's ok to disagree, but I think you've been working too hard on your >Hammond/Suzuki lately. If memory serves me the Hammond has >a flat pedal board, so toes may work better on it.<snip>   Not. The Hamm/Snooze 825 has an AGO pedalboard...about all it has to=20 recommend it!   COMING SOON!   DeserTBoB, tormented by Hammond dealers about the "new" (actually just a=20 rebadged Content D-2700 with less features) Hammond/Suzuki "Concert Series"= =20 CS-285, has decided to "take all challenges seriously" and conduct a "Cheap= =20 Digitorg SHOOTOUT", playing and review three or four of the bottom-line 3=20 manual consoles out there. This test and review will be conducted without= =20 any sales hype or "assistance" from the manufacturers/sellers, and will=20 measure console physical layout, "feel" and compliance to AGO standards,=20 along with subjective ratings on tonal systems, cost/benefit analyses, and= =20 so on. The models I'm considering reviewing are:   - Johannus Opus 30   - Allen Prot=E9g=E9 AP-31   - Baldwin (COS) "Prestige II" G404   - Hammond/Suzuki CS-285   Instruments under consideration will be ranked in order of overall quality,= =20 with specific reviews of all features included.   DeserTBoB      
(back) Subject: Severance Concert Ticket-cross posted From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 20:01:35 -0500   "Mike Gettelman" wrote:   Hi Everybody,   I have a single ticket available for the Severance Hall Concert on the restored Skinner on March 11. If you would like to have it, please contact me privately.   Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: Trem From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 18:56:52 -0600     - >In a message dated 3/2/01 7:49:49 PM EST, lmelby@prtel.com writes: > >> What would the effect on the operation of the trem be with >> a 2 inch pipe? Would the trem be a little milder? >> Rick Maryman wrote;   >The smaller diameter pipe will restrict the volume of air that the trem will >dump,   That was exactly what I was thinking, that the amount of air that is dumped would be less making for a milder tremolo.   >and could make the trem stop working.   Now that is the one thing I do not want to have happen.   Seems I should use the original pipe size of 3" when I install the tremolo units. I thank all of you who have adviced me on this,   Luther      
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 20:11:11 EST     --part1_34.11abb58a.27d2f02f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/3/01 10:53:00 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RonSeverin@aol.com =   writes:     > A new organist > in MHO should learn the norm of the MODERN 32 note Pedalboard. > > Therefore my recommendation for the Gleason still stands at the = beginning > of the 21st Century. :) I doubt if the flat pedalboard will make a = comeback > anytime soon as the keyboard of choice. It's nice to have a few museum > pieces lying around here and there to remind us, but I wouldn't want to > return to it! <GRIN> >   A new organist should learn BOTH flat and concave/convex pedalboards. New =   organists should learn to be open minded and to enjoy each instrument for what it is rather than what it could be if they could change it so they wouldn't have to learn anything new.   I still will agree with your recommendation of the Gleason method. It is excellent. I hate to pop your bubble (raaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaalllly I do!), but the flat pedalboard has already made a comback at the pedalboard of choice for many =   organists. You don't have to return to it, but please don't condemn those = of us who like prefer it.   One simply needs to learn a few different techniques to accommodate onself = to a flat pedalboard, but it is worth it.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_34.11abb58a.27d2f02f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/3/01 10:53:00 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RonSeverin@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">A new organist <BR>in MHO should learn the norm of the MODERN 32 note Pedalboard. <BR> <BR>Therefore my recommendation for the Gleason still stands at the = beginning <BR>of the 21st Century. :) I doubt if the flat pedalboard will make a = comeback <BR>anytime soon as the keyboard of choice. It's nice to have a few museum <BR>pieces lying around here and there to remind us, but I wouldn't want = to <BR>return to it! &lt;GRIN&gt; <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>A new organist should learn BOTH flat and concave/convex pedalboards. = &nbsp;New <BR>organists should learn to be open minded and to enjoy each instrument = for <BR>what it is rather than what it could be if they could change it so = they <BR>wouldn't have to learn anything new. <BR> <BR>I still will agree with your recommendation of the Gleason method. = &nbsp;It is <BR>excellent. <BR>I hate to pop your bubble (raaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaalllly I do!), but the = flat <BR>pedalboard has already made a comback at the pedalboard of choice for = many <BR>organists. &nbsp;You don't have to return to it, but please don't = condemn those of <BR>us who like prefer it. <BR> <BR>One simply needs to learn a few different techniques to accommodate = onself to <BR>a flat pedalboard, but it is worth it. <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_34.11abb58a.27d2f02f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Rueckpositiv divisions in Germany From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 20:34:15 -0500 (EST)     I'm playing a series of prelude movements from various large-scale prelude-and-fugue works of Bach as Lenten preludes, each followd by a chorale prelude. Three of these (C minor, B minor and E minor) are concerto-format works, and with a Rueckpositiv on the gallery edge, it's easy to set the _concertino_ passages off on the _Rueckpositiv_ from the _ripieno_ passages on the _Hauptwerk_ division.   A little expereince can be a dangerous thing, but alst summer's travels in Germany found no Rueckpositiv divisions on organs of relatively baroque-style design, if I recall correctly: Eisenach (St. George's Church); Arnstadt; Weimar (Stadtkirche or "Herderkirche")); Brandenburger Dom (1723 Wagner organ); St. Catharine's Church, Brandenburg; Leipzig (Thomaskirche, new organ). By comparison, however, the organ at the Stadtkirche in Balingen had two Rueckpositiv divisions, left and right ends of the balcony.   How common is the Rueckpositiv to organs of "authentic" German baroque design, either of 18th century or of modern re-creations? I supppose I expected to see more of this than our limited travels provided to me.   The Schlicker at Grace, Lancaster, does have a Rueckpositiv, and it's a blessing, most especialy for liturgy playing, given that the Hauptwerk and Swell are fairly high in the rear gallery and a bit far from the people, especially those who sit near the back of the nave.   If you wish: www.GraceLutheranChurch.com   then click on "music" and then on "Service Music." I hope the web site is working correctly if you try to go there.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 21:19:06 EST   In a message dated 3/3/01 7:12:57 PM Central Standard Time, = Cremona502@cs.com writes:   << but the flat pedalboard has already made a comback at the pedalboard of choice for = many organists. >>   It seems like every organ I've played in England has a flat pedalboard... perhaps not at Westminster Abbey, but all the others have been and only having a 29" inseem it is horribly difficult to sound like a professional organist when you can barely reach the pedals.... I prefer the AGO pedal boards by FAR.   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 18:28:43 -0800   But, John, you're making my point (grin) ... what I PREFERRED wasn't at = issue when I played the rededication recital on the 1899 Koehnken & Grimm at the = Shrine of the Immaculata in Cincinnati ... I played the Bach D Major Prelude and = Fugue on a flat, straight, short pedal board of 27 notes ... that's what the = organ HAD, and if I wanted to play the Bach, I had to be prepared to DEAL with it = (grin), INCLUDING playing it with all toes.   Cheers,   Bud   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/3/01 7:12:57 PM Central Standard Time, = Cremona502@cs.com > writes: > > << but the flat > pedalboard has already made a comback at the pedalboard of choice for = many > organists. >> > > It seems like every organ I've played in England has a flat = pedalboard... > perhaps not at Westminster Abbey, but all the others have been and only > having a 29" inseem it is horribly difficult to sound like a = professional > organist when you can barely reach the pedals.... I prefer the AGO = pedal > boards by FAR. > > John > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org