PipeChat Digest #1855 - Sunday, March 4, 2001
 
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Rueckpositiv divisions in Germany
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Benjamin Britton ?X Posted!
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
The Purcell Rondeau
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Pedaling and Other things
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Pedaling and Other things
  by <CdyVanpool@aol.com>
Re: Meistersinger
  by <WiegandCJ@aol.com>
Re: Rueckpositiv divisions in Germany
  by <WiegandCJ@aol.com>
Re: Organs in movies/TV
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
hygienic pedal-playing
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pedaling and Other things
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 06:19:06 EST     --part1_a6.10c4fae4.27d37eaa_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/4/01 11:11:38 AM !!!First Boot!!!, = desertbob@rglobal.net writes:     > Students approaching the organ have ENOUGH to worry about > WITHOUT worrying about playing geography skewed by some ego-tripping = "organ > architect"! I   One of the most irritating things I've noticed of late is that students do =   far too much worrying about console issues. I was taught to sit at the console and PLAY. If the bench is not just the right height, and i = don't have my organ shoes with me, and if there are stop tabs instead of = drawknobs, or 54 instead of 61 keys....   DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT... JUST PLAY AND PLAY WELL.   Almost every student recital I've been to in the past three or four years = has begun with ten-minutes of piston-setting, bench adjusting and console screwing-with. And then they didn't play that well!   Sorry. Console woes are far over-rated.       Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_a6.10c4fae4.27d37eaa_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/4/01 11:11:38 AM !!!First Boot!!!, desertbob@rglobal.net <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Students = approaching the organ have ENOUGH to worry about <BR>WITHOUT worrying about playing geography skewed by some ego-tripping = "organ <BR>architect"! &nbsp;I</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>One of the most irritating things I've noticed of late is that = students do <BR>far too much worrying about console issues. &nbsp;&nbsp;I was taught = to sit at the <BR>console and PLAY. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If the bench is not just the right = height, and i don't <BR>have my organ shoes with me, and if there are stop tabs instead of = drawknobs, <BR>or 54 instead of 61 keys.... <BR> <BR>DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT... JUST PLAY AND PLAY WELL. <BR> <BR>Almost every student recital I've been to in the past three or four = years has <BR>begun with ten-minutes of piston-setting, bench adjusting and console <BR>screwing-with. &nbsp;&nbsp;And then they didn't play that well! <BR> <BR>Sorry. &nbsp;Console woes are far over-rated. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a6.10c4fae4.27d37eaa_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 07:40:51 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2001 11:50 PM Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things   > True, that's the reality of these times, and only being made WORSE by = this > current "trendy/faddy" return to obsolescence.   I understand what you mean. I think it needs to be learned in terms of = being able to play lovely old instruments, such as Hooks or Hutchings.   > I can...but I prefer not to. It's yet another thing that interferes = with > interpretation of the musical program at hand, another annoyance, = another > hindrance.   But it -shouldn't- and that's the point. If you -don't- want anything to hinder the interpretation of the music, then one must be prepared for any "annoyance" on -any- instrument. An organist has to know what's going on mechanically (i.e. where everything is in relation to everything else) in order to play the music. If you can't play the instrument in the first place, what's the point of trying to make it musical?   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 07:48:46 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough To: PipeChat Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2001 4:52 AM Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things   >As far as rendering an "authentic performance", if a musician has to be FORCED to render >such a performance with obsolete console dimensions and appliances, then he's not much of >a musician, true?   Actually, I see this the other way around. If a musician -cannot- render such a performance with obsolete console dimensions and appliances, then he's not much of a musician.   Hey, my mother played a tubular-pneumatic when I was still subbing. I had = to work long and hard to play -anything- well on that. (And I'm talking = single notes! :-))   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Re: Rueckpositiv divisions in Germany From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 04 Mar 2001 06:51:24 -0600   In answer to Karl Moyer's question, the frequency of Ruckpositiv divisions = in old German organs depends very much on the particular area of Germany. On = the one hand Ruckpositivs were common in North Germany where Schnitger ruled = the roost. On the other hand the norm in East Germany was the = Hauptwerk/Oberwerk model, generally without Ruckpositiv. This included Saxony, Thuringia and surrounding principalities, and thus the area where J. S. Bach lived and worked. So the Ruckpositiv was pretty much alien to the native organ = building culture where Bach lived. This does not mean, however, that J. S. Bach = would not have liked to have a Ruckpositiv. He very much wanted, for example, = to become organist of the Jacobikirche in Hamburg, where there was a large four-manual Schnitger with Ruckpositiv that Bach much admired. = Unfortunately another candidate inveigled his way into the job, prompting Bach's famous remark that the successful candidate was "much better as fuguing with = dollars than with his fingers." The Saxon-Thuringian style of organ also differed from North German instruments in having a much less developed pedal = division, with little in the way of pedal upperwork. Also there was much more of a predilection for string stops, with stops like Gambas and Salicionals = being common on organs in Bach's neighborhood, but much rarer in North Germany.   It is interesting that the eighteenth-century Pennsylvania organ builder = David Tannenberg came from the same general region as Bach, and brought with him = the Hauptwerk/Oberwerk type of organ without Ruckpositiv. Therefore, though = you may have a Ruckpositiv on your organ at Grace Lutheran, I would say they = are on the whole Ruckpositivs are an alien concept so far as Lancaster, Pa., = is concerned :-)   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 04 Mar 2001 07:09:21 -0600   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Bob: > > I thought I'd ask this question, Is the stock Kilgen pedalboard a smidge > narrower than standard? The pedals always seemed to me to be > closer together and more cramped than say Moller. I took my first > lessons on a modified four rank Kilgen in the mid 1950's. 5 Estey ranks > were added by that time, as I remember. The organ was built in 1932. > the organ doesn't exist anymore due to an organ hobbiest gone wild > during the seventies. He gave the priests of this poor parish the = thought > that he knew everything. His ego didn't carry him very far, and he = destroyed > this organ. >   When one starts getting really picky, one discoveres that many builders = produced pedal boards that differ very slightly in their dimensions from the AGO standard. I believe this was true both of Moller and Aeolian-Skinner. I = think you will find that the Kilgen pedalboard is AGO standard and the Moller = one isn't. Personally I find the Moller ones more comfortable than AGO = standard.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Benjamin Britton ?X Posted! From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 13:18:47 -0000   Are you thinking of the main theme? if so, it is actually by Henry Purcell and called Rondeau from Abdelazer. I have copies in a couple of books - = the Oxford book of Wedding Music is one (I can't remember the other as all my music is at church!) I'm assuming that this is available worldwide, although I'm in the UK.   Hope this is a help,   Steve Barker   Organist and Master of the Choristers St Stephen's Church Canterbury, Kent. UK     ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: "Pipe Organs and Related Topics" <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Cc: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2001 3:47 AM Subject: Re: Benjamin Britton ?X Posted!     > Dear List: > > Is there a written transcription for organ of the opening movement > of The Young People's Guide to the Orchestra? I've heard it played > on the organ, and was wondering if sheet music existed, or if were > a well crafted improvisation. It's rather catchy and would make a > wonderful short postlude, say for a wedding. If it's available I would > like to obtain this piece. > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: The Purcell Rondeau From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 08:38:08 EST     --part1_56.803d157.27d39f40_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/4/2001 3:31:40 AM Eastern Standard Time, jhender@rscm.u-net.com writes:     > the Purcell Rondo is in "The Oxford Book of Ceremonial Music for > Organ" ed.Gower 1997 ISBN 0-19-375408-8 and not the 1970 album edited by > Christopher Dearnley. >   This information has been posted on PipOrg-L by John Henderson, but I = think not on Pipechat. In line with his comment, I also have the Rondeau in "A Wedding Bouquet, Organ Music for the Marriage Ceremony," published in 1979 = by Novello - Catalog No. 01 0149 04. The arrangement is by Desmond Ratcliffe.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   --part1_56.803d157.27d39f40_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/4/2001 3:31:40 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>jhender@rscm.u-net.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">the Purcell Rondo = is in "The Oxford Book of Ceremonial Music for <BR>Organ" ed.Gower 1997 ISBN 0-19-375408-8 and not the 1970 album edited = by <BR>Christopher Dearnley. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>This information has been posted on PipOrg-L by John Henderson, but I = think <BR>not on Pipechat. In line with his comment, I also have the Rondeau in = "A <BR>Wedding Bouquet, Organ Music for the Marriage Ceremony," published in = 1979 by <BR>Novello - Catalog No. 01 0149 04. The arrangement is by Desmond = Ratcliffe. <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler <BR>www.mander-organs.com</FONT></HTML>   --part1_56.803d157.27d39f40_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Pedaling and Other things From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 08:38:14 EST     --part1_5c.7f8ac56.27d39f46_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/4/2001 3:31:27 AM Eastern Standard Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:     > People > of "our" generation in the USofA seem far to rigid for our own good. I > would > venture to say that much of the problem with flat pedalboards is purely > psychological and if you hadn't looked you might not have had as much > trouble!   A few years ago, I wrote a piece about a post-Evensong concert at St. = Thomas Fifth Avenue, played by three students at Interlochen. One of them was = Scott Myers, who will play an entire post-Evensong recital there this afternoon. = Of the three students, he was the only one who had the desire or courage to = make use of the Taylor & Boody organ in the west gallery, and what he played on = it was a fast movement from a Bach Trio Sonata, I forget which one, but requiring immense agility. Scott had a very short time to acquaint himself =   with this instrument - something like 20 minutes, I think. It was flawless =   and exciting. I should have bequeathed him, at that moment, a tee shirt = with the message on the front: "No Fear."   Hi Ho, off to church,   Malcolm   --part1_5c.7f8ac56.27d39f46_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/4/2001 3:31:27 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>Cremona502@cs.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">People <BR>of "our" generation in the USofA seem far to rigid for our own good. = &nbsp;I <BR>would <BR>venture to say that much of the problem with flat pedalboards is = purely <BR>psychological and if you hadn't looked you might not have had as much <BR>trouble! </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>A few years ago, I wrote a piece about a post-Evensong concert at St. = Thomas <BR>Fifth Avenue, played by three students at Interlochen. One of them was = Scott <BR>Myers, who will play an entire post-Evensong recital there this = afternoon. Of <BR>the three students, he was the only one who had the desire or courage = to make <BR>use of the Taylor &amp; Boody organ in the west gallery, and what he = played on it <BR>was a fast movement from a Bach Trio Sonata, I forget which one, but <BR>requiring immense agility. Scott had a very short time to acquaint = himself <BR>with this instrument - something like 20 minutes, I think. It was = flawless <BR>and exciting. I should have bequeathed him, at that moment, a tee = shirt with <BR>the message on the front: "No Fear." <BR> <BR>Hi Ho, off to church, <BR> <BR>Malcolm</FONT></HTML>   --part1_5c.7f8ac56.27d39f46_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Pedaling and Other things From: <CdyVanpool@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 09:20:28 EST   One of the charming aspects of playing the organ is in playing many = different kinds of organs, with different kinds of sounds..... Lighten up....<G>   The "Gleason Method" is the best for technique, however, I got a copy of = Dr. Joyce Jones', "The King of Instruments" and it is pretty good. I think I = am going to start out a young student with this method, because it is simple, =   and later introduce her to the "Gleason."   Van Vanpool, organist FUMC Bowie, Texas  
(back) Subject: Re: Meistersinger From: <WiegandCJ@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 09:21:00 EST   In einer eMail vom 03.03.01 07:11:54 (MEZ) Mitteleurop=E4ische Zeit schreibt= =20 TubaMagna@aol.com:   << Yes, I believe there are two versions. I THINK the true and accurate one= =20 is=20 by Lemare, and I don't know the publisher. It was recorded at Saint John=20 the=20 Divine, years ago, by Anthony Newman, Randall Atcheson, Gary Schulz, and a=20 host of others. >>   A quite good recording of this and other Wagner arrangements for the organ i= s=20 still available. Harald Feller plays on the huge Jann organ of the Basilika=20 Waldsassen in Germany. You will find (and get) this recording at www.jpc.de.= =20 There is an English version of these pages, and deliveries all around the=20 world are possible. Type only "harald feller" in the search mask (without th= e=20 "" of course).   No, I'm not on the salary list of jpc :-))   Carl  
(back) Subject: Re: Rueckpositiv divisions in Germany From: <WiegandCJ@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 09:20:59 EST   In einer eMail vom 04.03.01 02:35:28 (MEZ) Mitteleurop=E4ische Zeit schreibt= =20 kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu:   << Three of these (C minor, B minor and E minor) are concerto-format works, and with a Rueckpositiv on the gallery edge, it's easy to set the _concertino_ passages off on the _Rueckpositiv_ from the _ripieno_ passages on the _Hauptwerk_ division.>>   I think you choose the Rueckpositiv because of its baroque character, i.e.=20 basing on 4 ft. Principal, many aliquotes, rather *sharp* sound. =20 <<How common is the Rueckpositiv to organs of "authentic" German baroque design, either of 18th century or of modern re-creations? >>   I think like at all times and all around in the world. Enough money and spac= e=20 -> new organ _with_, otherwise -> new organ without Rueckpositiv (or 32 ft.=20 or chamade or Zimbelstern or what ever you want).   But Bach and his contemporaries didn't a Rueckpositiv for your today purpose= ,=20 because the German (northern) baroque organs in any case (when they had more= =20 than one manuals) had a Brustwerk or Oberwerk with a similar disposition and= =20 sound as a Rueckpositiv. So they could play the concertino passages on the=20 Brustwerk or Oberwerk.   Most of the today organs are built as universal organs: Hauptwerk/Great for=20 *general purpose*, Swell for (French) Romantic, (Rueck-)Positiv for baroque.= =20 Such an organ obliges the use of the Rueckpositiv for concertino passages,=20 but this is a problem of our days. BTW: exact this was the reason for _later= _=20 additions of a (Rueck-)positiv to some romantic organs in Germany or France:= =20 better representation of baroque music (which was in the most cases not=20 achieved).   <<A little expereince can be a dangerous thing, but alst summer's travels in Germany found no Rueckpositiv divisions on organs of relatively baroque-style design, if I recall correctly: Eisenach (St. George's Church); Arnstadt; Weimar (Stadtkirche or "Herderkirche")); Brandenburger Dom (1723 Wagner organ); St. Catharine's Church, Brandenburg; Leipzig (Thomaskirche, new organ). By comparison, however, the organ at the Stadtkirche in Balingen had two Rueckpositiv divisions, left and right ends of the balcony.>>   I think you will find the answer above. Especially the new organ of the=20 Thomaskirche in Leipzig needs no Rueckpoitiv. This church has still the=20 romantic Sauer organ in its place. Straube, (first) interpret of Regers orga= n=20 composition, worked here as Thomasorganist. Because interpretation of baroqu= e=20 organ music on this Sauer is rather difficult, remedy was found not in addin= g=20 some *baroque* stops or a Rueckpositiv to the Sauer (the result wuold have=20 been a falsification of the Sauer), but the organ builder Gerhard Woehl (who= =20 built cleen styled *French symphonic* organs too) was ordered to build a=20 second, but pure *Bach* organ, and so a Rueckpositiv is not necessary.   As in all cases of my rare postings: please forgive my poor English.   Carl  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in movies/TV From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 09:21:46 EST     --part1_39.116a96d3.27d3a97a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/3/01 2:56:14 AM !!!First Boot!!!, artie00000@home.com =   writes:     > > I've been collecting appearances of pipe organs in movies and TV = series. > > I've just moved and updated the meager little site, so please take a = look > > and add your contributions, corrections and comments. > > > > http://angelfire.lycos.com/movies/lists >   I saw a movie last night on television called "Lotto" which was about a strange cultish town in New England called New Hope. Every year on June = 27, one of the citizens of the town is stoned to death "to please God". The main character is escaping from the townspeople after refusing to throw = his stone and runs into the village church. There is a small pipe organ on = the front wall. (I guess that's sort of a cameo appearance.)   Also, in the TV series Fr. Dowling Mysteries, Fr. Dowling relaxes by = playing the pipe organ in the gallery of the church. Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_39.116a96d3.27d3a97a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/3/01 2:56:14 AM !!!First Boot!!!, artie00000@home.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&gt; I've been = collecting appearances of pipe organs in movies and TV series. <BR>&gt; I've just moved and updated the meager little site, so please = take a look <BR>&gt; and add your contributions, corrections and comments. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; http://angelfire.lycos.com/movies/lists <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I saw a movie last night on television called "Lotto" which was about = a <BR>strange cultish town in New England called New Hope. &nbsp;&nbsp;Every = year on June 27, <BR>one of the citizens of the town is stoned to death "to please God". = &nbsp;&nbsp;The <BR>main character is escaping from the townspeople after refusing to = throw his <BR>stone and runs into the village church. &nbsp;There is a small pipe = organ on the <BR>front wall. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;(I guess that's sort of a cameo = appearance.) <BR> <BR>Also, in the TV series Fr. Dowling Mysteries, Fr. Dowling relaxes by = playing <BR>the pipe organ in the gallery of the church. <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_39.116a96d3.27d3a97a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 04 Mar 2001 22:36:54 +0800   Onya Bob! I agree! (Onya =3D OZ sign of approval!!!) T'other Bob.   Bob Scarborough wrote: > I can't agree to this. What SHOULD be done is to whack these > "retro-fad"/TrackerBacker builders over the HEADS and MAKE them build > consoles to AGO standards. Having to learn a technique for all > different types of consoles is WHY the standards came about in 1934 in > the first place! Wasting time learning how to play obsolete > instrument configuration is just more work to be done that's not > necessary.  
(back) Subject: hygienic pedal-playing From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 04 Mar 2001 07:02:36 -0800     --------------9111B17B9D875A917C51D624 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   But it was the standardization of the Industrial Age that brought about the assembly-line factory organ, standard pipe-scales, and all the OTHER horrors of the orchestral organ at its lowest point.   As to hygiene, the only connection I can think of is that there are a LOT of big pieces that require a (male) player to wear an athletic supporter in order to play the pedals safely, flat OR radiating/concave (grin) ... ditto carillon consoles (grin).   Cheers,   Bud, who's been there/done that (grin)   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/4/01 4:30:09 AM !!!First Boot!!!, > desertbob@rglobal.net > writes: > > > >> Anyone that's dealt >> with or has studied industrial techniques and hygiene will see this >> straight away! >> > > Oh! Now it makes sense. We must make sure that all of our organs > conform > to Industrial standards and are hygienic. We all wait with bated > breath for > the day when EVERYTHING will be standardized and sterile. > whoooooooopeeeeeeeeee > > Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --------------9111B17B9D875A917C51D624 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> But it was the standardization of the Industrial Age that brought about the assembly-line factory organ, standard pipe-scales, and all the OTHER horrors of the orchestral organ at its lowest point. <p>As to hygiene, the only connection I can think of is that there are a LOT of big pieces that require a (male) player to wear an athletic = supporter in order to play the pedals safely, flat OR radiating/concave (grin) ... ditto carillon consoles (grin). <p>Cheers, <p>Bud, who's been there/done that (grin) <p>Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 3/4/01 4:30:09 AM !!!First Boot!!!, = desertbob@rglobal.net</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Anyone that's dealt</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>with or has studied = industrial techniques and hygiene will see this</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>straight = away!</font></font> <br>&nbsp;</blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Oh!&nbsp; = Now it makes sense.&nbsp;&nbsp; We must make sure that all of our organs = conform</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>to = Industrial standards and are hygienic.&nbsp;&nbsp; We all wait with bated breath = for</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>the day = when EVERYTHING will be standardized and sterile.</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>whoooooooopeeeeeeeeee</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>Bruce&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ~&nbsp; Cremona502@cs.com</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>with the = Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!"</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Visit = Howling Acres at&nbsp;&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/">http://members.tripod.com/Bru= con502/</A></font></font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------9111B17B9D875A917C51D624--    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedaling and Other things From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 10:02:15 EST   In a message dated 3/4/01 2:31:28 AM Central Standard Time, = Cremona502@cs.com writes:   << I would venture to say that much of the problem with flat pedalboards is purely psychological and if you hadn't looked you might not have had as much trouble! >>   Perhaps, but it was still almost impossible to reach, with much accuracy, = the pedals on the far right side (say c25 or above). I think the panic kicked = in when I was missing the notes and thought "Good God! They're gonna think American organists are crap".   John