PipeChat Digest #1877 - Saturday, March 10, 2001
 
Fw: WurliTzer
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: Re:Marimba and wood harp,,,,was Felix Hell
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
A question of priorities?
  by "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk>
Bach Marathon in Allentown
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
Re: A question of priorities?
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: hand pumping
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: OTOH ...
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu>
Re: hand pumping
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: A question of priorities?
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: A question of priorities?
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Re: OTOH ...
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: hand pumping
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: hand pumping
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: A question of priorities?
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Olivier Latry in Fort Worth and Norman
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Couperin's "+"
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
FWD: Virus alert
  by "whutton" <whutton@bama.ua.edu>
Re: hand pumping
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: OTOH ...
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Fw: WurliTzer From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 06:59:37 -0500   Thanks. The piano has the vacuum stack in it -which I did in my shop. Just wiring = it to the switches is needed. Move over Jo Ann Castle!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Gary Blevins <gsblvns@camalott.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2001 4:21 AM Subject: WurliTzer     > Congrats on the harp and marimba, Rick...Good Luck with the piano! > -Gary > > > today I got the marimba and wood bar > > harp playing on my WurliTzer. The harp plays off the marimba thru separate > > wiring (avoiding the re-it blocks) and switches. I'll refelt the mallets, > > but as it is it sounds great. > > > > Next, is the vacuum upright piano (with tinkle bar). > > > > Rick > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Fw: Re:Marimba and wood harp,,,,was Felix Hell From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 07:08:57 -0500   Hi Roc ! It's spring here in the Indiana cornfields, by the way. My German shepherd loves it.   Whoever had the marimba/harp before me had rubber cloth on the pneumatics INSIDE OUT. The cloth was perfectly dry and crackled right off. Had to restore the thing out in the 3-car garage   Both the "C" and "C#" sections are about seven feet long and are now = mounted one-above-the-other on a chamber wall. That poor house!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 09, 2001 11:29 PM Subject: Re:Marimba and wood harp,,,,was Felix Hell     > Hey Rick!!!! > Kudo's to you dude.......That sounds like real progress on the Wurli. = Did > you have to do much restoration on the Marimba or the wood harp? > Cheers, [klink] > ---Roc > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: A question of priorities? From: "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 12:24:23 -0000   Dear All,   Just the other week here in Edinburgh, our local organists' society held a fascinating demonstration/workshop session on hymn / psalm accompaniment, = in which areas like legato playing, what to play for an introduction, how = long to pause between verses, phrasing, registration, etc. were all discussed.   I found myself on leaving having a discussion with myself - all the advice given in the afternoon had been extremely helpful towards the most = 'musical' of accompaniments, but is the most musical 'performance' of a hymn necessarily the most appropriate and conducive to worship?   For example, many people feel the hairs on the back of their neck standing up when the accompaniment modulates up a key for the last verse of a suitable hymn. I have to confess I occasionally enjoy this too, but my organist friends would slate me for it! Likewise, my own congregation love (and thrive) on occasional verses completely unaccompanied - there is no choir, yet they stay perfectly in tune and sing their hearts out. Is this musical? I mentioned the practice at the seminar and was met with patronising stares of disbelief! I thought afterwards of mentioning the = Free Church - they manage fine without instruments!   But seriously, is the most musical always the most appropriate? I realise that for some this is an unnecessary question, but I wonder what others think?   Best wishes   Andrew Caskie    
(back) Subject: Bach Marathon in Allentown From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 07:57:53 -0500   Greetings List! Announcing the annual Bach Marathon sponsored by the Lehigh Valley Chapter of the AGO tomorrow, Sunday, from 2-9 p.m. The half-hour performances by = 11 organists, other solo instrumentalists, and choirs will be held at Egner Memorial Chapel on the campus of Muhlenberg College. The organ is a = 46-rank mechanical action Holtkamp from 1982. If any of you are in the vicinity, = and have the time and inclination, please stop by . . the campus is at 2400 = Chew Street in Allentown, Pennsylvania. If you would like more details about = the performances, go to www.lvago.org and click on Bach Marathon. While you're there, check out the Region III Convention coming up this summer hosted by the LVAGO.   Have a great weekend!   Stephen Williams College Organist and Chapel Musician, Muhlenberg College      
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities? From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 07:58:27 EST     --part1_92.116f4c7d.27db7ef3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/10/2001 7:26:48 AM Eastern Standard Time, caskie@totalise.co.uk writes:     > For example, many people feel the hairs on the back of their neck = standing > up when the accompaniment modulates up a key for the last verse of a > suitable hymn. I have to confess I occasionally enjoy this too, but my > organist friends would slate me for it! Likewise, my own congregation = love > (and thrive) on occasional verses completely unaccompanied - there is no > choir, yet they stay perfectly in tune and sing their hearts out. Is = this > musical?   I can't speak for everyone around here, but I can't imagine any organist friends "slating" (there's a word I don't think I have ever heard around here. If it's been done to me, I failed to notice!) anyone here for = playing an interlude before a last verse that served to raise the key. It's hardly =   uncommon around here, and the question of its musicality is answered by = how well it is done - the quality of the interlude, that is. I and my congregation share your enthusiasm for an occasional unaccompanied verse, particularly for some poignant spot in the text. It becomes unmusical if everyone sags by a tone during the verse, and when the organ returns, it appears to have suddenly gone terribly sharp! I think it safe to say that = in this country, in most traditions, you would escape any danger of "slating" =   for either of these not uncommon practices.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler Mander Organs, U. S. A. O/ChM Trinity Episcopal Church, Stamford, CT   --part1_92.116f4c7d.27db7ef3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/10/2001 7:26:48 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>caskie@totalise.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">For example, many = people feel the hairs on the back of their neck standing <BR>up when the accompaniment modulates up a key for the last verse of a <BR>suitable hymn. I have to confess I occasionally enjoy this too, but my <BR>organist friends would slate me for it! Likewise, my own congregation = love <BR>(and thrive) on occasional verses completely unaccompanied - there is = no <BR>choir, yet they stay perfectly in tune and sing their hearts out. Is = this <BR>musical? </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I can't speak for everyone around here, but I can't imagine any = organist <BR>friends "slating" (there's a word I don't think I have ever heard = around <BR>here. If it's been done to me, I failed to notice!) anyone here for = playing <BR>an interlude before a last verse that served to raise the key. It's = hardly <BR>uncommon around here, and the question of its musicality is answered = by how <BR>well it is done - the quality of the interlude, that is. I and my <BR>congregation share your enthusiasm for an occasional unaccompanied = verse, <BR>particularly for some poignant spot in the text. It becomes unmusical = if <BR>everyone sags by a tone during the verse, and when the organ returns, = it <BR>appears to have suddenly gone terribly sharp! I think it safe to say = that in <BR>this country, in most traditions, you would escape any danger of = "slating" <BR>for either of these not uncommon practices. <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler <BR>Mander Organs, U. S. A. <BR>O/ChM Trinity Episcopal Church, Stamford, CT</FONT></HTML>   --part1_92.116f4c7d.27db7ef3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: hand pumping From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 21:30:13 +0800   No. of course not, how could I from 10000 miles away? However we have several hand pumped organs here. I studied some physics at school, and properly regulated air is air no matter how it is produced. I know with some hand pumps the pulse at the end of the stroke would give them away any time, but who would want that sort of difference? Not me. I would like to blindfold some of you guys and sit you down with an organ and see whether you could tell which kind of pumping was being used.I don't think you could. Bob E.   > Like I said before, have you heard this organ? There is a difference = between the blower and hand pumping.  
(back) Subject: Re: OTOH ... From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 08:43:31 -0500   > NOW ... to get us back on track (?) ... would someone like to take a > guess as to WHAT ornament the "+" sign in the Lyre Bird edition of > Couperin is supposed to represent? (grin)   I'll guess a mordent.   -Stephen  
(back) Subject: Re: hand pumping From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 08:16:16 -0600   Bob Elms wrote:   > properly regulated air is air no > matter how it is produced.   The problem is that getting the wind "properly regulated" is extremely = difficult. Until the early nineteen-hundreds all organs were pumped by means of the feeders. This = could be done in three ways: (1) by a pump handle (2) by a hydraulic motor (a single cylinder engine powered by = water) or (3) by a DC electric motor operating on the feeders through eccentrics. The third of these options = is probably the most satisfactory system ever devised, but ceased to be viable when most electricity mains = became AC instead of DC. AC motors do not like working through rheostats, and it is therefore impossible to = regulate the speed of the motor satisfactorily.   At the end of the nineteenth century a Mr. Sturtevant had the idea of = connecting a rotary fan to pipe organs, thus producing the modern "electric blower", in which the entry of the = wind into the organ is controlled by a curtain valve or static flow regulator, so that the AC electric motor can = run at full speed all the time. The drawback of this system, however, is that wind produced by fans is not = uniform, but contains turbulence and comes in little pockets or pulses. In a well-designed system turbulence = can be kept to a minimum, but almost any observer can hear the difference when the same organ is hand pumped = and electrically blown. The electric blower introduces a fuzziness into the voicing, while handblown = instruments sound cleaner and purer. Anyone who does not believe that this is the case should try playing the same = piece on the same organ, with the same registration, using hand and electric blowing, and I can guarantee they = will be able to tell the difference.   In most situations these days, however, it is impractical to use hand = blowing, particularly in larger instruments. In these cases it is important to design the winding system = so that turbulence is kept to a minimum. The placing and design of the reservoirs and schwimmers and even = the material and length of the windlines can play an important part in this.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities? From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 08:39:12 -0600     Regarding accompanying hymns and psalms sung by the congregation, Andrew = Caskie asked about the advisability of an occasional unaccompanied verse, and = also about modulating for the last verse in a hymn.   My own feelings on these items quite frankly favors unaccompanied verses a = bit more than the upward modulation (in a session I attended much like the one Andrew described, someone once observed that silence is the one stop which sounds alike on every instrument). And frankly, if I am uncertain that = the congregation is capable of maintaining pitch or rhythm of a hymn, I have = played the melody line only on a single stop, as a means of approaching the = feeling of unaccompanied singing, and when blessed with a choir, I have used "choral verses" in the minor key (Example: in the hymn text "All Creatures of Our = God and King", the penultimate verse--"And even you, most gentle death, = waiting to hush our final breath"--gains additional poignancy when sung in d minor = instead of d major.   My biggest worry about all such accompanying techniques, however, is that = they will become trite and "gimmick-y" from over use. While I feel that the congregation as a whole should never be confused by the accompaniment = techniques used, the techniques should not necessarily be altogether predictable, = either.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities? From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:01:01 -0500   In my experience, the use of unaccompanied verses and modulations between verses must be decided on a case-by-case basis depending at least on the congregation's wishes, as well as other factors.   In one church where I was organist/choirmaster, I was told at the initial interview that the congregation did not like or want any modulations between verses. I found out later that a previous organist had used them so often and to such an overdone extent that the congregation was often = not able to know when to sing or not. In my mind, a judicious use of the technique would not have caused the perception by the congregation that modulations were distracting rather than uplifting.   It seemed probable to me that the previous organist had tried to show off his expertise at the expense of allowing the congregation to participate fully in the hymns. They were turned off by the experience.   Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (Retired)   you wrote:   >Regarding accompanying hymns and psalms sung by the congregation, Andrew >Caskie >asked about the advisability of an occasional unaccompanied verse, and = also >about modulating for the last verse in a hymn. > >My biggest worry about all such accompanying techniques, however, is that = they >will become trite and "gimmick-y" from over use. While I feel that the >congregation as a whole should never be confused by the accompaniment >techniques >used, the techniques should not necessarily be altogether predictable, = either. > >ns    
(back) Subject: Re: OTOH ... From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 09:56:32 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 09, 2001 6:43 PM Subject: OTOH ...   > NOW ... to get us back on track (?) ... would someone like to take a > guess as to WHAT ornament the "+" sign in the Lyre Bird edition of > Couperin is supposed to represent? (grin)   To raise the note a half step? E.g. 3rd or 4th?   Are you quizzing us, or asking us? :-)   -Rebekah      
(back) Subject: Re: hand pumping From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:21:24 EST   In a message dated 3/10/01 7:34:43 AM Central Standard Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes:   << I would like to blindfold some of you guys and sit you down with an organ and see whether you could tell which kind of pumping was being used.I don't think you could. >>   Sounds kinky to me.  
(back) Subject: Re: hand pumping From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:28:22 EST     --part1_a8.123b7440.27dba216_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/10/2001 9:18:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes:     > operating on the feeders through eccentrics   Is this a slur on the Biggs Fellows who worked so hard pumping at = Wellesley last summer?       --part1_a8.123b7440.27dba216_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/10/2001 9:18:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">operating on the = feeders through eccentrics</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Is this a slur on the Biggs Fellows who worked so hard pumping at = Wellesley <BR>last summer? <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_a8.123b7440.27dba216_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities? From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:29:29 EST   In a message dated 3/10/01 8:37:56 AM Central Standard Time, mjolnir@ticnet.com writes:   << Andrew Caskieasked about the advisability of an occasional = unaccompanied verse, and also about modulating for the last verse in a hymn. >>   I usually only modulate to the last verse on very well known and = triumphant hymns; such as, "All Creatures of Our God and King", "Praise to The Lord", =   etc... and I do it sparingly. Regarding unaccompanied verses... I do it = very rarely, but I find it extremely effective on the last verse of "Silent = Night" on Christmas Eve... it usually brings tears to the eyes and money to the plate ;-)   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Olivier Latry in Fort Worth and Norman From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Thu, 08 Mar 2001 11:54:03 -0500   Hi, Y'all!   It was my pleasure to hear Olivier Latry twice last weekend. The programs were identical, except for the improvisation melodies, and the encores, however, the "Sabre Dance" was played as the encore at each concert. In Norman, he added the Alain "Litanies" as a second encore. From what John McElliott told me, he played the same concert at the Museum in Cleveland Wednesday night, except the encore there was a piece he had written to honor Karen McFarlane.   Peter posted the program on the List, so I won't bother to retype the program.   St. Stephen's Presbyterian Church in Fort Worth is a biiiiiiig room with a big organ. The organ began life as a Moller, but (according to the brochure) after many mechanical problems, etc., it was decided to use some of the organ as a core for the new instrument. Dan Garland, a local, but obviously very talented, organbuilder designed and constructed the new instrument. The facade is by Roy Redman. It's a very handsome organ in = this room. The sound is smooth and I guess could be characterized by an English-type sound. It worked well for the pieces Olivier chose, but I = must confess I felt a little disconnected from the player. I was glad they had used a closed-circuit camera set up with a couple of t.v. monitors close = to the front. The visual helped with the player-audience connection.   This concert was the first of those sponsored by a foundation organized = and funded to honor the work of Emmett G. Smith, who has had a a long and distinguished career as professor at Texas Christian University. It is a wonderful honor to a fine gentleman. I was introduced to him at halftime and I had a lovely conversation with him. He's a great man. Mark and the Church were very kind and hospitable to me in providing suggestions for hotels and directions to their building. The reception was nicely done AND in a room large enough where people actually had a chance to visit and socialize.   After attending services at Highland Park Presbyterian Church (Andy Kotylo is the very wonderful new organist) and Park Cities Presbyterian Church = (my former and esteemed colleague, Colin Howland, is the organist at PCPC), we drove to Norman, Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma for Olivier's concert on the new Fisk.   The musical experience at Norman was definitely a "wow!" The building, the acoustic, the organ, the player, and the hospitality, all worked together to provide a wonderful, wonderful, musical and social experience for me.   The new organ is a 3-manual, mechanical actioned Fisk. I like the organ very much. It has very generous scalings and nothing screams or hollers "listen to me." It's a good blend from 16 through mixtures and reads. = There are 8-foot principals on each of the manuals. Each is beautifully voiced and makes for the perfect foundation for the organ. This organ served this music perfectly. I asked Olivier if he could have played Symphonic literature on the Fisk and he very quickly answered in the affirmative.   During the reception, I asked Olivier about the Bach "Passacaglia" and he said "let's go to the organ." So off we went, just me and my Buckeye = friend (we're both from Xenia), and for the next 2 hours, I had a private masterclass with Olivier. He played everything from memory, including 4 of the 6 trio sonatas, the Passacaglia, two of the d minors (Fiddle and Dorian) and some of the Franck a-minor chorale. Whew! My brains were on overload and my musical sensitivities were pushed to the max. What a brilliant player AND teacher.   After a too-brief sleep and breakfast with Olivier the next morning, we were off to DFW to fly home and back on the bench, trying to decide if I should give up playing or whether I should work harder than ever.   I had a wonnnnnnnderful vacation to Texas and Oklahoma. It was a special treat for me and one for which I will never forget (until senility finally settles in for a long stay!).   Yours, written hastily since I host the Vienna Choir Boys for their concert tonight at CRPC,   I am,   Darryl by the Sea    
(back) Subject: Couperin's "+" From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:05:36 -0800   Naw, I'm ASKING ... I've heard different guesses at different workshops, but nobody seems to KNOW with any certainty based on contemporary theoretical sources.   Cheers,   Bud   Rebekah Ingram wrote:   > ----- Original Message ----- > From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> > To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Friday, March 09, 2001 6:43 PM > Subject: OTOH ... > > > NOW ... to get us back on track (?) ... would someone like to take a > > guess as to WHAT ornament the "+" sign in the Lyre Bird edition of > > Couperin is supposed to represent? (grin) > > To raise the note a half step? E.g. 3rd or 4th? > > Are you quizzing us, or asking us? :-) > > -Rebekah > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: FWD: Virus alert From: "whutton" <whutton@bama.ua.edu> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 12:37:12 -0600   >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Original Message From Jeff McLelland = <jffmclnd@bellsouth.net> =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Urgent Notice   Read immediately and pass on to everyone you know.   Someone is sending out a very cute screensaver of the Budweiser Frogs.If   you download it, you will lose everything! Your hard drive will crash and someone from the Internet will get your screen name and password!   DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES! It just went into circulation yesterday. Please distribute this message. This is a new, very malicious virus and not many people know about it. This information was announced yesterday morning from Microsoft. Please share it with everyone that might access the Internet. Once again, Pass This Along To EVERYONE in your address book so that this may be stopped. AOL has said that this   is a very dangerous virus and that there is NO remedy for it at this time. This is VERY important. If you receive a screen saver from a friend or anyone you may not know with the Budweiser Frogs in it, DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT OR OPEN THE FILE! Press the forward button on your email program and send this notice to EVERYONE you know. Let's keep our email safe for everyone.   This is a service to all of our affiliates to help them keep their email   and computer files safe.   Warren Hutton University Organist Professor Emeritus of Music but still teaching School of Music The University of Alabama Box 870366 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0366 (205) 348-1461 whutton@bama.ua.edu    
(back) Subject: Re: hand pumping From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:42:03 -0800   At 09:30 PM 3/10/2001 +0800, t'other Bawb wrote: >I studied some physics at school, and properly regulated air is air no >matter how it is produced.<snip>   Amen to THAT!   >I know with some hand pumps the pulse at the end of the stroke would give =   >them away any time, but who would want that sort of difference? Not = me.<snip>   I still maintain (although I'm also guilty of not hearing the U of M "Frisky", as Cranky Ol' Ray demanded to know) that the reason for the = nasty sounds emitted from "retro-fad" organs when on wind supplied by an axial fan is that their winding systems, "faithful" to obsolete concepts hailing =   form the Baroque era, are simply unable to deal with maintaining evenly regulated static pressure. Modern organs, with decentralized sprung regulators properly sized, have no trouble with this.   >I would like to blindfold some of you guys and sit you down with an >organ and see whether you could tell which kind of pumping was being >used.I don't think you could.<snip>   I'm not as sure about this. In the hand pumped windbags I've heard, it's QUITE obvious there's hand winding going on...the organ exhibits a = definate "tremolo" because of the hand pumping, sometimes happening at most unfortunate parts of the music at hand!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: OTOH ... From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:43:40 -0800   At 08:43 AM 3/10/2001 -0500, you wrote: > > NOW ... to get us back on track (?) ... would someone like to take a > > guess as to WHAT ornament the "+" sign in the Lyre Bird edition of > > Couperin is supposed to represent? (grin) > >I'll guess a mordent.<snip>   Wait! Hode on!   I THINK Gleason covers this, as do a couple of other authors. I seem to remember it signifying a mordent, but I shall attack the stacks and inbestigate!   dB