PipeChat Digest #1879 - Sunday, March 11, 2001
 
Re: A question of priorities?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: console standards
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: A question of priorities?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Soft registrations
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Soft registrations
  by "Louis Katz" <Louis.Katz@iris.tamucc.edu>
Re: Soft registrations
  by "Patricia A. Blissenbach" <pab@inreach.com>
Re: Soft registrations
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: A question of priorities
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
service list - St. Matthew's-By-the-ARCO-Station, Cosa Mesa, CA USA  ((X-
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Soft registrations
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
mixtures
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: A question of priorities
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: mixtures
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 07:17:24 -0600   Bruce Cornely wrote:   > Each situation requires its own formula. Every congregation > I've ever > served has enjoyed occasional and fairly frequent unaccompanied > stanzas of > hymns. To me, outrageous harmonic variance is annoying and > changing chords > just to see how many different chords will work on one note is > very > unmusical. Toss in walking pedal lines, too! >   I agree. The important thing is to be tasteful and not to overdo things. In our church we once had to suffer an organist who while technically accomplished used to overdo things on the variant harmony front. The congregation used to stop singing in order to listen to what he was doing. This is not a good way to accompany. The same organist when asked to play a program of organ music for Christmas devoted the entire program to Widor's Second Symphony, which under the circumstances was felt to be a little heavy for the occasion. On the other hand the occasional fa-burden or variant harmony unison verse of hymns goes down very well with our congregation.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: console standards From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 09:06:33 EST     --part1_55.12554e08.27dce069_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/11/01 9:58:48 AM !!!First Boot!!!, MWORGLBAU@aol.com writes:     > , > > "The first thing you usually do once you've gotten the airplane on = the > ground and slowed down below flying speed is to raise the flaps." > >   Is this like closing the swell shades at the end of a toccata or fugue???   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_55.12554e08.27dce069_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/11/01 9:58:48 AM !!!First Boot!!!, MWORGLBAU@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">, <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;"The first thing you usually do once you've = gotten the airplane on the <BR>ground and slowed down below flying speed is to raise the flaps." <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Is this like closing the swell shades at the end of a toccata or = fugue??? <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_55.12554e08.27dce069_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 09:10:06 EST     --part1_95.80a2688.27dce13e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/11/01 1:18:08 PM !!!First Boot!!!, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes:     > In our church we once had to suffer an organist who > while technically accomplished used to overdo things on the > variant harmony front. The congregation used to stop singing in > order to listen to what he was doing.   Possibly, but then, it's difficult to hold a hymnal and place your hands = over your ears at the same time.   I recall an organist playing a stanza of "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee" (Hymn to Joy) using a contrary motion toccata figure on the manuals and melody in the pedal in octaves. The congregation stopped singing... but = not to listen, but to laugh! We all wondered what world he was in... or what world we were in!!   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_95.80a2688.27dce13e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/11/01 1:18:08 PM !!!First Boot!!!, <BR>jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">In our church we = once had to suffer an organist who <BR>while technically accomplished used to overdo things on the <BR>variant harmony front. &nbsp;The congregation used to stop singing in <BR>order to listen to what he was doing. &nbsp;</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Possibly, but then, it's difficult to hold a hymnal and place your = hands over <BR>your ears at the same time. <BR> <BR>I recall an organist playing a stanza of "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore = Thee" <BR>(Hymn to Joy) using a contrary motion toccata figure on the manuals = and <BR>melody in the pedal in octaves. &nbsp;&nbsp;The congregation stopped = singing... but not <BR>to listen, but to laugh! &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>We all wondered what world he was in... or what world we were in!! <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_95.80a2688.27dce13e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Soft registrations From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 09:41:29 EST   Hi group,   During Lent I have a self imposed rule that I very sparingly, if at all, = use the reeds or Mixture. I have also reduced the registration for hymns to = just 8', 4', and an occasional 2'. Yesterday, I played a funeral and observed = the same rules. Here's the amazing thing... I can work up a big rip-roaring tocatta/postlude/etc.... and rarely get praise; but, playing quietly and serenely I've received accolades from almost everyone in the church in = less than two weeks.... I guess it's true, people (parishioners) really don't like loud organ music.   Any thoughts?   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Soft registrations From: "Louis Katz" <Louis.Katz@iris.tamucc.edu> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 09:43:34 -0800   A few thoughts.   I now own a pipe organ. It has 43 ranks. Mostly pretty funky. The ground connections were globbily soldered, and it seems that in order to get the = thing working and to overcome missing notes in most ranks it was played very = loudly. The church was going to have it removed by a construction company that = would most likely have scrapped it. As I was removing it, some who had = misgivings about its removal would say, " if he hadn't played so loud'.   I do not spend much time in churches, but I have sung in synagogue choirs. = Seems that the congregations I have been around like loud voices, soft = accompaniment.   When I trained to become a camp counselor I was told to never raise my = voice for more than a second to get attention than to say all the important stuff = very softly. In a few days the kids would learn to really listen.   A student came to ask me how I liked his music during a theatre piece I attended. I told him it was amplified so loud that I ceased to be able to concentrate on it, it just numbed my senses.   Your observation/experience doesn't suprise me.   Louis Louis@nceca.net   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote:   > Hi group, > > During Lent I have a self imposed rule that I very sparingly, if at all, = use > the reeds or Mixture. I have also reduced the registration for hymns to = just > 8', 4', and an occasional 2'. Yesterday, I played a funeral and = observed the > same rules. Here's the amazing thing... I can work up a big rip-roaring > tocatta/postlude/etc.... and rarely get praise; but, playing quietly and > serenely I've received accolades from almost everyone in the church in = less > than two weeks.... I guess it's true, people (parishioners) really = don't > like loud organ music. > > Any thoughts? > > John > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Soft registrations From: "Patricia A. Blissenbach" <pab@inreach.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 08:14:44 -0800   Hello PipeChat Listers, This is my first message and I've got a God gig this morning so I will be brief. In response to the message below, the congregation where I play does not like loud organ music during the service. They have surprised me with applaud for a prelude now and then and they will quite often applaud a = loud showy postlude.   BR, Patricia B-bach AGO - First United Methodist Church, Oroville, CA.   ----- Original Message ----- From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2001 6:41 AM Subject: Soft registrations     > Hi group, > > During Lent I have a self imposed rule that I very sparingly, if at all, use > the reeds or Mixture. I have also reduced the registration for hymns to just > 8', 4', and an occasional 2'. Yesterday, I played a funeral and = observed the > same rules. Here's the amazing thing... I can work up a big rip-roaring > tocatta/postlude/etc.... and rarely get praise; but, playing quietly and > serenely I've received accolades from almost everyone in the church in less > than two weeks.... I guess it's true, people (parishioners) really = don't > like loud organ music. > > Any thoughts? > > John > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Soft registrations From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 11:45:05 -0500   "Mike Gettelman" replies:   There seem to be many in the congregation who simply "tolerate" the = organ as a traditional implement of worship with no real appreciation for its scope = beyond that. I come from the school that thinks God may just be getting a little = hard of hearing after all these years, and needs the full organ once and a while = to get his full attention. <grin>.   Soft registrations on the other hand give one a chance to really hear = the individual voices of the instrument, and don't overpower or distract from = the liturgical message of the moment, so indeed have their place. But like I = have said before, every organist should try to provide at least one or two = moments of full organ for those musicians amongst the congregation who attend in part = for the love of the instrument. "Joyous Noise" is not always subtle. <grin = again>   Cheers Mike   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote:   > Hi group, > > During Lent I have a self imposed rule that I very sparingly, if at all, = use > the reeds or Mixture. I have also reduced the registration for hymns to = just > 8', 4', and an occasional 2'. Yesterday, I played a funeral and = observed the > same rules. Here's the amazing thing... I can work up a big rip-roaring > tocatta/postlude/etc.... and rarely get praise; but, playing quietly and > serenely I've received accolades from almost everyone in the church in = less > than two weeks.... I guess it's true, people (parishioners) really = don't > like loud organ music. > > Any thoughts? > > John > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 15:16:52 EST   Hello to all,   This is an interesting thread from which much can be learned. As organist =   for a not-so-large UME church with a predominately senior congregation, I = am rather careful in taking liberties during congregational hymns. = Modulating on the last verse is a rare thing for me but today seemed to be one of = those exceptions. The opening hymn was Lancashire to the setting of "Lead On, O =   King Eternal." Singing was robust and moving up a half-step just seemed = to happen naturally. We literally raised the roof on the last verse. I have never experienced such enthusiasm with this congregation. It was, of = course, the last time the congregation will hear a full organ registration until Easter.   In fairness, all concerns previously voiced about out new pastor have been =   put to rest. She is really concerned that the music fit the service and = the season. We have had some very productive discussions on the subject and = the latest produced a surprise: Postludes. The pastor finds it (if I may paraphrase) lacking in respect for the composer, the organist, and the practice effort involved for Postludes to be exit music. Glory to God! = She has promised that changes are a'coming.   But what makes this a glorious day is that my choir grew by five members today. One is a lyric soprano, another an alto, two tenors and a bass. = All except one have had formal training. I am elated. What makes this even = more significant is that all are from another UME locally which is getting = heavy into the Praise Band routine. Hmmmm.   Best to all, Jim    
(back) Subject: service list - St. Matthew's-By-the-ARCO-Station, Cosa Mesa, CA USA ((X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 12:38:29 -0800   The Second Sunday In Lent Solemn Mass at 10:30 a.m.   Voluntary - Air in D - Bach Proper - Reminiscere - Dr. Willan (SATB) Setting - Merbecke Gradual-Psalm 142 - Voce mea ad Dominum - Anglican Chant - Dupius in g minor Offertory Anthem - Lord, For Thy Tender Mercy's Sake - Farrant? Communion Anthem - Ave verum - Elgar Hymns Kind Maker of the World, O Hear - Jesu dulcis memoria (Andernach) My Faith Looks Up To Thee - Olivet O Love, How Deep, How Broad, How High - Deus tuorum militum Voluntary - "Little" Prelude and Fugue in d minor - Bach   One of those days ... screaming babies, ushers yakking in the back of the church, choir all over the lot, EXCEPT for the anthems, thank goodness!   Standing room only in the church.   Had to change the anthems to the above because the soprano soloist was sick the past two weeks, and I'd scheduled two new things she hadn't seen.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Soft registrations From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 18:31:17 EST     --part1_33.11d6ebb1.27dd64c5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: <<During Lent I have a self imposed rule that I very sparingly, if at all, =   use the reeds or Mixture. I have also reduced the registration for hymns to = just 8', 4', and an occasional 2'. (snip) I guess it's true, people (parishioners) really don't like loud organ music.   Any thoughts?>>   A couple.... First, I agree with you about loud organ music, although I think the = mixtures are the most hated of all. People really seem to like the rich majestic sounds of English reeds. French reeds that are harmonically intense, = tend to fall into the "mixture" trap.   Especially in a well voiced organ in a good room, there is a very = satisfying support provided by a "pure" chorus of 8, 4 and 2. If the reeds can then = be added to provide richness without intensity and volume, then the sound is enhanced. This is the sound that most people really like and associate = with "the organ". This is the kind of sound that the new "Quincyvant" in the =   Jacoby Symphony Hall in Jacksonvile FL provides. It is wonderfully gentle =   and pure, and when the reeds are added it simply becomes purely rich. = Loud does not feel "loud" but feels satisfying, much like a really well = prepared dinner in conservative portions!       Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_33.11d6ebb1.27dd64c5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2><I>DRAWKNOB@aol.com = &nbsp;wrote: <BR></I> <BR>&lt;&lt;During Lent I have a self imposed rule that I very sparingly, = if at all, <BR>use <BR>the reeds or Mixture. &nbsp;I have also reduced the registration for = hymns to just <BR>8', 4', and an occasional 2'. &nbsp;(snip) <BR> &nbsp;I guess it's true, people (parishioners) really don't <BR>like loud organ music. <BR> <BR>Any thoughts?&gt;&gt; <BR> <BR>A couple.... <BR>First, I agree with you about loud organ music, although I think the = mixtures <BR>are the most hated of all. &nbsp;People really seem to like the rich = majestic <BR>sounds of English reeds. &nbsp;&nbsp;French reeds that are = harmonically intense, tend <BR>to fall into the "mixture" trap. <BR> <BR>Especially in a well voiced organ in a good room, there is a very = satisfying <BR>support provided by a "pure" chorus of 8, 4 and 2. &nbsp;&nbsp;If the = reeds can then be <BR>added to provide richness without intensity and volume, then the sound = is <BR>enhanced. &nbsp;This is the sound that most people really like and = associate with <BR>"the organ". &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This is the kind of sound that the new = "Quincyvant" in the <BR>Jacoby Symphony Hall in Jacksonvile FL provides. &nbsp;It is = wonderfully gentle <BR>and pure, and when the reeds are added it simply becomes purely rich. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Loud <BR>does not feel "loud" but feels satisfying, much like a really well = prepared <BR>dinner in conservative portions! <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_33.11d6ebb1.27dd64c5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: mixtures From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 15:58:51 -0800   Mark this day down on your Kalendars (grin) ... I agree with Bruce.   Most mixtures are simply excruciating high-pitched noise to 90% of non-organists, whether the mixture in question be good, bad or indifferent from the organ-builder's standpoint.   I have had a VERY lively debate with several organ-builders about whether or not to include a mixture in the rebuild of the Surf City Moller. My opinion: an organ with good placement in a reasonably live room seating only 150 people doesn't NEED a mixture; I'd rather have a Great Clarinet (grin). I MIGHT allow a very MILD mixture that starts low and descends LOWER fairly quickly, for the sake of my eventual successor(s), PREFERABLY in the SWELL, where it can be TAMED (grin).   High-pitched mixtures gave me a headache in COLLEGE, thirty years ago; NOW I find them UNBEARABLE, and no, I DON'T wear a hearing aid. I can't IMAGINE what they'd sound like if I DID.   Cheers,   Bud, who is now cheerfully accepting donations for more 8' stops and more REEDS (grin)    
(back) Subject: Re: A question of priorities From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 19:07:29 EST     --part1_e5.3761669.27dd6d41_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/11/01 8:17:21 PM !!!First Boot!!!, Wurlibird1@aol.com =   writes:     > It was, of course, > the last time the congregation will hear a full organ registration until =   > Easter. > >   Shame on you! If you are going to be liturgical, at least FOLLOW the = dang rules. Sundays ARE NOT part of Lent and are still to be celebrated as a "Little Easter." Today was miserable for me. Our music was so morose = that I was depressed at the end of the service (not to mention throughout) and = was unable to really concentrate on the sermon. Even the rector seemed to be struggling to overcome the malaise. My mother and several other parishioners voiced similar feelings, but really didn't seem to know why = they felt bad until I asked, "Was the music uplifting today?" A concensus of = NO followed. I asked the rector at the coffee hour if I could get a bonus = day free of fasting and abstinence during the week since today was obviously abstinence from joy. Remember, folks, as you plan your "chancel = games".... Sundays are NOT part of Lent! If you're going to be a Pharisee, at = least follow ALL the rules. There are some liturgical elements that are = omitted to draw attention to the penitential season surrounding the Sundays, but = it is very important not to lose sight of the reason we are gathered to = worship, and that is to offer PRAISE!   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_e5.3761669.27dd6d41_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/11/01 8:17:21 PM !!!First Boot!!!, Wurlibird1@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It was, of course, =   <BR>the last time the congregation will hear a full organ registration = until <BR>Easter. <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Shame on you! &nbsp;&nbsp;If you are going to be liturgical, at least = FOLLOW the dang <BR>rules. &nbsp;&nbsp;Sundays ARE NOT part of Lent and are still to be = celebrated as a <BR>"Little Easter." &nbsp;&nbsp;Today was miserable for me. &nbsp;Our = music was so morose that <BR>I was depressed at the end of the service (not to mention throughout) = and was <BR>unable to really concentrate on the sermon. &nbsp;Even the rector = seemed to be <BR>struggling to overcome the malaise. &nbsp;&nbsp;My mother and several = other <BR>parishioners voiced similar feelings, but really didn't seem to know = why they <BR>felt bad until I asked, "Was the music uplifting today?" &nbsp;&nbsp;A = concensus of NO <BR>followed. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I asked the rector at the coffee hour if I = could get a bonus day <BR>free of fasting and abstinence during the week since today was = obviously <BR>abstinence from joy. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Remember, folks, as you plan = your "chancel games".... <BR>Sundays are NOT part of Lent! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If you're going to be = a Pharisee, at least <BR>follow ALL the rules. &nbsp;&nbsp;There are some liturgical elements = that are omitted <BR>to draw attention to the penitential season surrounding the Sundays, = but it <BR>is very important not to lose sight of the reason we are gathered to = worship, <BR>and that is to offer PRAISE! <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_e5.3761669.27dd6d41_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: mixtures From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 19:24:59 -0500   To Bud and the List:   I couldn't disagree with you more. Mixtures ARE the organ. Whenever I look at an organ specification, I look for the Mixtures first. Most British and American organs up to recently were pretty dull sounding organs, no matter how big or loud. I have made it a point to listen to a lot of different organs in France and Holland. The Dutch are VERY big on Mixtures in even their smallest organs. I was particularly interested in Kampen, Bolsward and Gouda. Mixtures galore. The result is a wonderful brilliance that crowns the Full organ with or without reeds. French organs in the 18th and 19th Century as well as the new ones in Canada ( not Casavant) and France have wonderful Mixtures.   I recently heard the Aeolian Skinner since all the new stuff had been added in Riverside and was struck by the Mixtures. The Mander organ in New York City has wonderful Mixtures.   I can't imagine that listening to them would give you a headache. Some mixtures are so beautiful that they could almost be played on their own. Knowing how easily those tiny little pipes can go out of tune leads me to believe that most of what you listened to was out of tune. It doesn't take much to throw a 2" pipe out of whack. Even a little bit of dust getting caught in the mouth can do it just as easily as a change in temp.   The Dutch have an incredible array of Mixtures in their organs. I had been told that back in the early days when hand pumping was the only way to go, wind being in short supply, necessitated lots of little pipes with lots of noise in the form of Mixtures. I don't believe this, but those little pipes can make a lot of noise. The SCHERP I heard was audible above the Full organ of 50 or 60 ranks and added a wonderful brilliance. Noise, hardly. Unbearable, definitely not.   Many of the mixtures I have heard on early 20th Century American and British organs were a waste of time. The exception to this is the Midmer-Losh in Atlantic City. I believe that for an American Organ of the mostly 8' only era, 120 ranks of mixtures out of 449 is a huge percentage. Fortunately, Emerson Richards did not fall into the trap of building an organ to be the biggest by just having a huge number of 8 stops most of which were diminutive. The results speak.     Antonio