PipeChat Digest #1886 - Wednesday, March 14, 2001
 
Urgent-Need Organ Book
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Re: Ben van Oosten recital
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: Urgent-Need Organ Book
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Urgent-Need Organ Book
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Urgent-Need Organ Book
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Easter Service List - St. Matthew's, Newport Beach CA USA (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Easter Service List - St. Matthew's, Newport Beach CA USA(X-posted)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
pLaN aHeAd......
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
(no subject)
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: (no subject)
  by "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net>
 

(back) Subject: Urgent-Need Organ Book From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 06:23:52 -0800 (PST)   Hi-   I need the book, "Method of Organ Playing" by Harold Gleason. It has to be EIGHTH edition. I need ASAP. I will pay postage.   Does anyone have one of these books sitting around collecting dust that they would sell to me at a good price? The condition doesn't matter as long as there are no pages missing and it is the eighth edition.   Thanks so much! --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > In a message dated 3/12/01 8:08:59 PM !!!First > Boot!!!, runyonr@muohio.edu > writes: > > > > Yes, I know the INTENTION was different ... > drawing the Octaves Graves and > > >playing at the upper end when the manual 16's > were already drawn allowed > > there > > >to be 16' tone in the ensemble in the top of the > keyboard, much the same > > as a > > >manual 32' stop on large organs, which is > supposed to serve the same > > purpose. > > > > I have used an opposite maneuver for playing French > music on a non-French > designed organ, for instance at the conclusion of > the a-minor Franck chorale > or Piece Heroique. I draw the mixtures and the > play an octave lower. It > gives a very rich and full result. > > > Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ > ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Visit Howling Acres at > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - Buy the things you want at great prices. http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Ben van Oosten recital From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 09:31:34 EST     --part1_14.10f9d43e.27e0dac6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I don't attend many organ recitals in New York City --- usually pretty = dull affairs! --- but last night, intrigued by some FREE publicity given to the =   event by the august New York Times, I attended one. Given by an organist from Holland, Ben van Oosten, and performed on the van den Heuvel organ (which I had not previously heard) at the Episcopal Church of the Holy Apostles in the Chelsea area of Manhattan.   I'm glad I went. Mr. van Oosten turned out to be a bona fide virtuoso on = the organ. Any organist who can play an entire program without a wrong note in sight = (or should I say, hearing) has something going for him.   But aside from that, his approach to the music he performed showed genuine =   insight, and his registrations were imaginative and invariably appropriate = to the music at hand.   The program itself, though, left something to be desired. The organist opened with the Sonate Pontificale by Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens (1823 - = 1881), an eminently forgettable composition. The entire program, actually, was entitled "The Lemmens Tradition" --- for no discernible reason.   This was followed by music of much more sophistication: a group of short pieces by Louis Vierne (1870 - 1937). An early (1894) Prelude; Nos. 12 = and 21 from the 24 Pieces en style libre, op. 31; and the beautiful Stele pour = un enfant defunte (No. 3 from the Tryptique, op. 58). I had the advantage of =   either having played these pieces myself or having frequently heard them performed on the great organ of St. Joseph's Oratory in Montreal. Mr. van =   Oosten's performances here were sympathetic. Perhaps a tad too quick for = my personal preference, but thoroughly enjoyable nonetheless.   A minor work, Prelude et Fugue in F Minor by Marcel Dupre followed. Interesting, but not one of Dupre's best efforts.   Then came the Symphonie No. 6 by Charles-Marie Widor, op. 42. Now, this = is one of the great warhorses of the organ repertory --- and I can assure all =   that it is no picnic to play! Particularly the first and last movements. =   The question is: Is it worth the effort? Because there is nothing = profound here. Probably the most interesting movement (of the five) is the first: Allegro. But to pull this off in the grand manner --- as the performer = was clearly trying to do --- really requires the ambience and the acoustics of =   the French cathedral, which is what Widor had in mind when he wrote the = work. Alas, the acoustics of the modest-sized church here militated against success: dead as a doornail. Mr. van Oosten told me, after the concert, = that the acoustics were somewhat more lively when the room was empty, but that = the sound deadened as the room filled up with people. And the rather small = room was, indeed, filled with people last night! That free publicity in the = Times certainly didn't hurt!   I can report that the artist performed the work flawlessly and with imagination, recalling to my mind the great Dupre recording of the 1950s = on the (then intact) G. Donald Harrison organ at St. Thomas Church in New = York. But the lack of any reverberation --- no fault of the performer --- left = the grandiose work falling flat.   The organ itself is a fine instrument; but again, in those dead acoustics, =   the brilliant mixtures and powerful reeds sound overbearing. The = instrument is most successful, in this ambience, when played with the foundation = stops; and then it sounds quite beautiful.   The church, incidentally, doubles as a synagogue and --- during the week = --- as a soup kitchen. Very plain and unadorned --- it was restored after a = fire in the 1980s --- with no statues, Stations, or candles in sight. The = organ is situated in the small north transept, to the left of the sanctuary --- presumably because it was too big to be placed into the small organ loft. =   The instrument extends from the floor virtually to the ceiling. I wonder = who paid for it?   Mr. van Oosten plays next on a Beckerath organ in Milburn, New Jersey (St. =   Stephen's Church), when he will perform a program of baroque music. He is =   quoted as saying: "It is always a great pleasure for me to play these instruments [Beckeraths], because of their well equilibrated sound = qualities, their comfortable key action, and their solidity of construction."   Amazingly, though, he confessed that he still has not heard or played on Beckerath's magnum opus: the incomparable organ at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal. He promised to do so at the earliest possible opportunity.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_14.10f9d43e.27e0dac6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I don't attend many = organ recitals in New York City --- usually pretty dull <BR>affairs! --- but last night, intrigued by some FREE publicity given to = the <BR>event by the august New York Times, I attended one. &nbsp;Given by an = organist <BR>from Holland, Ben van Oosten, and performed on the van den Heuvel = organ <BR>(which I had not previously heard) at the Episcopal Church of the Holy =   <BR>Apostles in the Chelsea area of Manhattan. <BR> <BR>I'm glad I went. &nbsp;Mr. van Oosten turned out to be a bona fide = virtuoso on the <BR>organ. <BR>Any organist who can play an entire program without a wrong note in = sight (or <BR>should I say, hearing) has something going for him. <BR> <BR>But aside from that, his approach to the music he performed showed = genuine <BR>insight, and his registrations were imaginative and invariably = appropriate to <BR>the music at hand. <BR> <BR>The program itself, though, left something to be desired. &nbsp;The = organist <BR>opened with the Sonate Pontificale by Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens (1823 - = 1881), <BR>an eminently forgettable composition. &nbsp;The entire program, = actually, was <BR>entitled "The Lemmens Tradition" --- for no discernible reason. <BR> <BR>This was followed by music of much more sophistication: a group of = short <BR>pieces by Louis Vierne (1870 - 1937). &nbsp;An early (1894) Prelude; = Nos. 12 and <BR>21 from the 24 Pieces en style libre, op. 31; and the beautiful Stele = pour un <BR>enfant defunte (No. 3 from the Tryptique, op. 58). &nbsp;I had the = advantage of <BR>either having played these pieces myself or having frequently heard = them <BR>performed on the great organ of St. Joseph's Oratory in Montreal. = &nbsp;Mr. van <BR>Oosten's performances here were sympathetic. &nbsp;Perhaps a tad too = quick for my <BR>personal preference, but thoroughly enjoyable nonetheless. <BR> <BR>A minor work, Prelude et Fugue in F Minor by Marcel Dupre followed. = &nbsp; <BR>Interesting, but not one of Dupre's best efforts. <BR> <BR>Then came the Symphonie No. 6 by Charles-Marie Widor, op. 42. = &nbsp;Now, this is <BR>one of the great warhorses of the organ repertory --- and I can assure = all <BR>that it is no picnic to play! &nbsp;Particularly the first and last = movements. &nbsp; <BR>The question is: Is it worth the effort? &nbsp;Because there is = nothing profound <BR>here. &nbsp;Probably the most interesting movement (of the five) is = the first: <BR>Allegro. &nbsp;But to pull this off in the grand manner --- as the = performer was <BR>clearly trying to do --- really requires the ambience and the = acoustics of <BR>the French cathedral, which is what Widor had in mind when he wrote = the work. <BR>&nbsp;Alas, the acoustics of the modest-sized church here militated = against <BR>success: dead as a doornail. &nbsp;Mr. van Oosten told me, after the = concert, that <BR>the acoustics were somewhat more lively when the room was empty, but = that the <BR>sound deadened as the room filled up with people. &nbsp;And the rather = small room <BR>was, indeed, filled with people last night! &nbsp;That free publicity = in the Times <BR>certainly didn't hurt! <BR> <BR>I can report that the artist performed the work flawlessly and with <BR>imagination, recalling to my mind the great Dupre recording of the 1950s on <BR>the (then intact) G. Donald Harrison organ at St. Thomas Church in New = York. &nbsp; <BR>But the lack of any reverberation --- no fault of the performer --- = left the <BR>grandiose work falling flat. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>The organ itself is a fine instrument; but again, in those dead = acoustics, <BR>the brilliant mixtures and powerful reeds sound overbearing. &nbsp;The = instrument <BR>is most successful, in this ambience, when played with the foundation = stops; <BR>and then it sounds quite beautiful. <BR> <BR>The church, incidentally, doubles as a synagogue and --- during the = week --- <BR>as a soup kitchen. &nbsp;Very plain and unadorned --- it was restored = after a fire <BR>in the 1980s --- with no statues, Stations, or candles in sight. = &nbsp;The organ <BR>is situated in the small north transept, to the left of the sanctuary = --- <BR>presumably because it was too big to be placed into the small organ = loft. &nbsp; <BR>The instrument extends from the floor virtually to the ceiling. = &nbsp;I wonder who <BR>paid for it? <BR> <BR>Mr. van Oosten plays next on a Beckerath organ in Milburn, New Jersey = (St. <BR>Stephen's Church), when he will perform a program of baroque music. = &nbsp;He is <BR>quoted as saying: "It is always a great pleasure for me to play these <BR>instruments [Beckeraths], because of their well equilibrated sound = qualities, <BR>their comfortable key action, and their solidity of construction." <BR> <BR>Amazingly, though, he confessed that he still has not heard or played = on <BR>Beckerath's magnum opus: the incomparable organ at l'Oratoire St. = Joseph, <BR>Montreal. &nbsp;He promised to do so at the earliest possible = opportunity. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_14.10f9d43e.27e0dac6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Urgent-Need Organ Book From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 10:16:47 EST     --part1_e1.119b824c.27e0e55f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/14/01 2:24:27 PM !!!First Boot!!!, = clavinova98@yahoo.com writes:     > I need the book, "Method of Organ Playing" by Harold > Gleason. It has to be EIGHTH edition.   Cindy, I was going to offer you my copy, but alas it has disappeared. It is a wonderful book and when you get a copy DON'T EVER LOAN IT TO ANYONE. I can't think of any other book in my library that has been replaced as many =   times as Gleason 8th!!   Best of luck.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_e1.119b824c.27e0e55f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/14/01 2:24:27 PM !!!First Boot!!!, clavinova98@yahoo.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I need the book, = "Method of Organ Playing" by Harold <BR>Gleason. It has to be EIGHTH edition. </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Cindy, <BR>I was going to offer you my copy, but alas it has disappeared. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It is a <BR>wonderful book and when you get a copy DON'T EVER LOAN IT TO ANYONE. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I <BR>can't think of any other book in my library that has been replaced as = many <BR>times as Gleason 8th!! <BR> <BR>Best of luck. <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_e1.119b824c.27e0e55f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Urgent-Need Organ Book From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 10:37:40 -0400   >Hi- > >I need the book, "Method of Organ Playing" by Harold >Gleason. It has to be EIGHTH edition. I need ASAP. I >will pay postage. >   Cindy, why does it have to be the eighth edition, I wonder? Just curious.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu  
(back) Subject: Re: Urgent-Need Organ Book From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 11:32:13 -0500     --------------BF63CE5F6BB5CC37A975A375 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Cindy, The following site has several editions of the Gleason including the 8th, which is unfortunately, quite expensive compared to the earlier editions   http://www.abebooks.com/   Good Luck Mike Gettelman   Cindy Adams wrote:   > Hi- > > I need the book, "Method of Organ Playing" by Harold > Gleason. It has to be EIGHTH edition. I need ASAP. I > will pay postage. > > Does anyone have one of these books sitting around > collecting dust that they would sell to me at a good > price? The condition doesn't matter as long as there > are no pages missing and it is the eighth edition. > > Thanks so much! > --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > > In a message dated 3/12/01 8:08:59 PM !!!First > > Boot!!!, runyonr@muohio.edu > > writes: > > > > > > > Yes, I know the INTENTION was different ... > > drawing the Octaves Graves and > > > >playing at the upper end when the manual 16's > > were already drawn allowed > > > there > > > >to be 16' tone in the ensemble in the top of the > > keyboard, much the same > > > as a > > > >manual 32' stop on large organs, which is > > supposed to serve the same > > > purpose. > > > > > > > I have used an opposite maneuver for playing French > > music on a non-French > > designed organ, for instance at the conclusion of > > the a-minor Franck chorale > > or Piece Heroique. I draw the mixtures and the > > play an octave lower. It > > gives a very rich and full result. > > > > > > Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com > > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ > > ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > > Visit Howling Acres at > > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > > > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Cindy > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Auctions - Buy the things you want at great prices. > http://auctions.yahoo.com/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   --------------BF63CE5F6BB5CC37A975A375 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> &nbsp;Hi Cindy, <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The following site has several editions of the = Gleason including the 8th, which is unfortunately, quite expensive compared to the earlier editions<a href=3D"http://www.abebooks.com/"></a> <p><a href=3D"http://www.abebooks.com/">http://www.abebooks.com/</a> <p>Good Luck <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mike Gettelman <p>Cindy Adams wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>Hi- <p>I need the book, "Method of Organ Playing" by Harold <br>Gleason. It has to be EIGHTH edition. I need ASAP. I <br>will pay postage. <p>Does anyone have one of these books sitting around <br>collecting dust that they would sell to me at a good <br>price? The condition doesn't matter as long as there <br>are no pages missing and it is the eighth edition. <p>Thanks so much! <br>--- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <br>> In a message dated 3/12/01 8:08:59 PM !!!First <br>> Boot!!!, runyonr@muohio.edu <br>> writes: <br>> <br>> <br>> > Yes, I know the INTENTION was different ... <br>> drawing the Octaves Graves and <br>> > >playing at the upper end when the manual 16's <br>> were already drawn allowed <br>> > there <br>> > >to be 16' tone in the ensemble in the top of the <br>> keyboard, much the same <br>> > as a <br>> > >manual 32' stop on large organs, which is <br>> supposed to serve the same <br>> > purpose. <br>> > <br>> <br>> I have used an opposite maneuver for playing French <br>> music on a non-French <br>> designed organ, for instance at the conclusion of <br>> the a-minor Franck chorale <br>> or Piece Heroique.&nbsp;&nbsp; I draw the mixtures and the <br>> play an octave lower.&nbsp;&nbsp; It <br>> gives a very rich and full result. <br>> <br>> <br>> Bruce&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ~&nbsp; Cremona502@cs.com <br>> with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ <br>> ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <br>> Visit Howling Acres at <br>> <a = href=3D"http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/">http://members.tripod.com/Bru= con502/</a> <br>> <p>=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D <br>Cindy <p>__________________________________________________ <br>Do You Yahoo!? <br>Yahoo! Auctions - Buy the things you want at great prices. <br><a href=3D"http://auctions.yahoo.com/">http://auctions.yahoo.com/</a> <p>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" <br>PipeChat:&nbsp; A&nbsp; discussion List for pipe/digital organs &amp; related topics <br>HOMEPAGE : <a = href=3D"http://www.pipechat.org">http://www.pipechat.org</a> <br>List: <a = href=3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org</a> <br>Administration:&nbsp; <a = href=3D"mailto:admin@pipechat.org">mailto:admin@pipechat.org</a> <br>Subscribe/Unsubscribe:&nbsp; <a = href=3D"mailto:requests@pipechat.org">mailto:requests@pipechat.org</a></blo= ckquote> </html>   --------------BF63CE5F6BB5CC37A975A375--    
(back) Subject: Easter Service List - St. Matthew's, Newport Beach CA USA (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 10:06:23 -0800   Easter Day, April 15th, 2001 Solemn Mass at 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. (quartet at 8:30, choir at 10:30)   Opening Voluntary - TBA (they'll be lucky to get an improvisation, after OUR Holy Week) (grin) Closing Voluntary - ditto   Proper - Resurrexi - Gregorian and fauxbourdons Setting - Mass of the Quiet Hour - Oldroyd   Anthem - Christ, Our Passover - Schilling   Processional - Welcome, Happy Morning! - Fortunatus Sequence - Christians, To the Paschal Victim - Gregorian Communion - Jesus Lives, Thy Terrors Now - St. Albinus Come, Risen Lord - Edsall At the Lamb's High Feast - Salzburg Recessional - Jesus Christ Is Risen Today - Easter Hymn       Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Service List - St. Matthew's, Newport Beach CA USA(X-posted) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 13:16:56 -0600   Dang, Bud, I'm impressed - I ain't anywhere near Easter Day's program yet. A recital in a week and a half, the outgoing Bishop's last visitation here on that very day (52 Sundays in a year, and he picks that Sunday!), and = Holy Week still to go.   Shaking my head in wonderment,   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: pLaN aHeAd...... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 11:49:54 -0800   Well, I *am* still typesetting some minor Holy Week revisions (mostly typesetting stuff that was still in hand-written manuscript), but I = pounded 90% of that into their heads four years ago ... we do the whole nine yards, = but I don't make any BIG changes from year to year ... so it usually just takes = two or three run-throughs.   And the anthem was decided last SUMMER when I found the Schilling in some = of the old music that was donated ... my 75-year-old mezzo had been begging me to = find it ever since I've been at St. Matthew's. I would have done it in any = case, because my mezzo is a dear soul and a good musician; happily, it turned = out to be a really fun piece to sing.   Our liturgy is also a lot more static than the modern Episcopal liturgy = ... after four years, it's a matter of refining the music for the Propers and = adding new anthems for specific Sundays to the repertoire as I find them. We = only sing four Mass settings (the four in the 1940 Hymnal) in rotation, so we're not learning a new Mass every week or every month.   So I CAN plan WAY ahead ... (grin)   Cheers,   Bud   Glenda wrote:   > Dang, Bud, I'm impressed - I ain't anywhere near Easter Day's program = yet. > A recital in a week and a half, the outgoing Bishop's last visitation = here > on that very day (52 Sundays in a year, and he picks that Sunday!), and = Holy > Week still to go. > > Shaking my head in wonderment, > > Glenda Sutton > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: (no subject) From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 14:45:04 EST     --part1_d0.12c989cc.27e12440_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Perhaps one of you guys can help me... I have recently took over a position on the organ at a large church (around 2,500). I just about died when I saw this "organ." I walked into =   the huge church (which seats 3,750 people) and was taken in by the 50 foot =   ceilings in the foyer, the crystal chandeliers, and the gigantic grand staircase leading to the balcony which wraps around the inside of the sanctuary like a mezzanine. So I was beginning to get a pretty good idea = of what the organ would be like...Next I walk through the double doors (one = out of about 50) into the sanctuary and I am awestruck at the immense size of = the stage...I saw no visible organ pipes, and no organ for that matter- what I =   did see was a white kawai concert grand, a huge drum set, an orchestra = loft, and a choir loft that seats about 500...but again no organ. Finally, the pastor and I walk about 200 feet across the stage to the area behind the concert grand piano, and here sits a little, old, dusty, Hammond C-3, with = a single Leslie speaker. About half of the finish was scraped off this = little organ and the speaker. It wasn't even plugged in. I was pretty let down. = It was NOTHING like I expected. So here is my question... Is it possible to get a good, vibrant sound = out of this thing, that will at all enhance this church's dynamic music = program, that doesn't sound too "hammondy"? If so, does anyone know the proper registrations that would make traditional hymn sound triumphant, and = grand? The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that destroyed =   the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. It = even survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the = organ. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks, Josh White   --part1_d0.12c989cc.27e12440_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Perhaps one of you guys = can help me... <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I have recently took over a position on the organ = at a large church <BR>(around 2,500). &nbsp;I just about died when I saw this "organ." = &nbsp;I walked into <BR>the huge church (which seats 3,750 people) and was taken in by the 50 = foot <BR>ceilings in the foyer, the crystal chandeliers, and the gigantic grand =   <BR>staircase leading to the balcony which wraps around the inside of the <BR>sanctuary like a mezzanine. &nbsp;So I was beginning to get a pretty = good idea of <BR>what the organ would be like...Next I &nbsp;walk through the double = doors (one out <BR>of about 50) into the sanctuary and I am awestruck at the immense size = of the <BR>stage...I saw no visible organ pipes, and no organ for that matter- = what I <BR>did see was a white kawai concert grand, a huge drum set, an orchestra = loft, <BR>and a choir loft that seats about 500...but again no organ. = &nbsp;Finally, the <BR>pastor and I walk about 200 feet across the stage to the area behind = the <BR>concert grand piano, and here sits a little, old, dusty, Hammond C-3, = with a <BR>single Leslie speaker. &nbsp;About half of the finish was scraped off = this little <BR>organ and the speaker. &nbsp;It wasn't even plugged in. &nbsp;I was = pretty let down. &nbsp; <BR>It was NOTHING like I expected. &nbsp; <BR>So here is my question... &nbsp;&nbsp;Is it possible to get a good, = vibrant sound out <BR>of this thing, that will at all enhance this church's dynamic music = program, <BR>that doesn't sound too "hammondy"? &nbsp;If so, does anyone know the = proper <BR>registrations that would make traditional hymn sound triumphant, and = grand? <BR>The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. &nbsp;It = has <BR>sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that = destroyed <BR>the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. &nbsp;It even <BR>survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the = organ. <BR>Any input would be appreciated. <BR>Thanks, Josh White</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d0.12c989cc.27e12440_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 13:57:23 -0600   Yep, I have the only solution --- find another position! You will never be happy there, and they will never be happy with you.   Wake up and smell the coffee!   TC