PipeChat Digest #1887 - Wednesday, March 14, 2001
 
the Hammonds that refuse to die (anybody got a sharp STAKE???)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: (no subject)
  by "conmara" <conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com>
undying Hammonds, cont.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: (no subject)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: (no subject)
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: (no subject)
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Dennis James/Silent Film Concerts to debut restored METROPOLIS in San Fra
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: (no subject)
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Ben van Oosten:  review of review
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
Re: (no subject)
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: the Hammonds that refuse to die (anybody got a sharp STAKE???) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 12:14:47 -0800     --------------20881B4A50E58AD6A84DE4C6 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Oh my ... ANOTHER "irreplaceable" Hammond (grin) ... been there/done that.   WE finally snuck out and bought a second-hand pipe organ (grin).   About all you can really do is multiply the number of Leslies (be sure you get second-hand REAL Leslies and NOT the current Hammond/Suzuki ones), get 'em up as high as possible (maybe in the four corners of the church, with switching so you can turn the back ones off when the congregation isn't singing). Get Leslies with reverb, or get a reverb unit.   It also may be possible to put the Hammond through the church's sound system, but that takes a good mixing board and a good sound engineer to really make it work. Also, the PA speakers have to be big enough to handle the sound of the organ.   If you go into the back of the console, you can adjust the brightness (if the room's dead, turn it DOWN and crank up the BASS), and you can also re-set the presets by moving the wires around on the little switchboard. It's a pain, but it CAN be done. Get a used copy of Irwin's Dictionary of Hammond Organ Stops and follow it METICULOUSLY. Some of the solo presets are OK, but most of the ensemble ones are useless, particularly Great "A" with the muddy 16', and that UGLY 'Cello on the Great is best burnt (grin).   Other than that, it is what it is ... my hymn combination is 00-8746-235 on the Great and 00-7605-004 on the Swell ... a good softer combination is 00-8765-432, maybe with VC 1 or the Leslie on "Choral". Clarinet is 00-8060-400 (play with the strength of the two upper drawbars); Oboe is 00-4888-000 (or something like that); Trumpet is 00-8888-800 ... I think those are slightly different from the presets.   Don't ask it to do what it CAN'T do (mostly big full organ combinations).   You have my sympathies (grin)!   Cheers,   Bud       Pologaptommy@aol.com wrote:   > Perhaps one of you guys can help me... > I have recently took over a position on the organ at a large church > > (around 2,500). I just about died when I saw this "organ." I walked > into > the huge church (which seats 3,750 people) and was taken in by the 50 > foot > ceilings in the foyer, the crystal chandeliers, and the gigantic grand > > staircase leading to the balcony which wraps around the inside of the > sanctuary like a mezzanine. So I was beginning to get a pretty good > idea of > what the organ would be like...Next I walk through the double doors > (one out > of about 50) into the sanctuary and I am awestruck at the immense size > of the > stage...I saw no visible organ pipes, and no organ for that matter- > what I > did see was a white kawai concert grand, a huge drum set, an orchestra > loft, > and a choir loft that seats about 500...but again no organ. Finally, > the > pastor and I walk about 200 feet across the stage to the area behind > the > concert grand piano, and here sits a little, old, dusty, Hammond C-3, > with a > single Leslie speaker. About half of the finish was scraped off this > little > organ and the speaker. It wasn't even plugged in. I was pretty let > down. > It was NOTHING like I expected. > So here is my question... Is it possible to get a good, vibrant > sound out > of this thing, that will at all enhance this church's dynamic music > program, > that doesn't sound too "hammondy"? If so, does anyone know the proper > > registrations that would make traditional hymn sound triumphant, and > grand? > The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has > sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that > destroyed > the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. It > even > survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the > organ. > Any input would be appreciated. > Thanks, Josh White   --------------20881B4A50E58AD6A84DE4C6 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Oh my ... ANOTHER "irreplaceable" Hammond (grin) ... been there/done that. <p>WE finally snuck out and bought a second-hand pipe organ (grin). <p>About all you can really do is multiply the number of Leslies (be sure you get second-hand REAL Leslies and NOT the current Hammond/Suzuki ones), get 'em up as high as possible (maybe in the four corners of the church, with switching so you can turn the back ones off when the congregation isn't singing). Get Leslies with reverb, or get a reverb unit. <p>It also may be possible to put the Hammond through the church's sound system, but that takes a good mixing board and a good sound engineer to really make it work. Also, the PA speakers have to be big enough to handle the sound of the organ. <p>If you go into the back of the console, you can adjust the brightness (if the room's dead, turn it DOWN and crank up the BASS), and you can also re-set the presets by moving the wires around on the little switchboard. It's a pain, but it CAN be done. Get a used copy of Irwin's Dictionary of Hammond Organ Stops and follow it METICULOUSLY. Some of the solo = presets are OK, but most of the ensemble ones are useless, particularly Great "A" with the muddy 16', and that UGLY 'Cello on the Great is best burnt = (grin). <p>Other than that, it is what it is ... my hymn combination is = 00-8746-235 on the Great and 00-7605-004 on the Swell ... a good softer combination is 00-8765-432, maybe with VC 1 or the Leslie on "Choral". Clarinet is 00-8060-400 (play with the strength of the two upper drawbars); Oboe is 00-4888-000 (or something like that); Trumpet is 00-8888-800 ... I think those are slightly different from the presets. <p>Don't ask it to do what it CAN'T do (mostly big full organ = combinations). <p>You have my sympathies (grin)! <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <p>Pologaptommy@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D-1>Perhaps one of you guys can help me...</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp; I have = recently took over a position on the organ at a large church</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>(around 2,500).&nbsp; I just about died when I saw this "organ."&nbsp; I walked into</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>the huge church (which = seats 3,750 people) and was taken in by the 50 foot</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>ceilings in the foyer, = the crystal chandeliers, and the gigantic grand</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>staircase leading to = the balcony which wraps around the inside of the</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>sanctuary like a = mezzanine.&nbsp; So I was beginning to get a pretty good idea of</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>what the organ would be like...Next I&nbsp; walk through the double doors (one out</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>of about 50) into the = sanctuary and I am awestruck at the immense size of the</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>stage...I saw no = visible organ pipes, and no organ for that matter- what I</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>did see was a white = kawai concert grand, a huge drum set, an orchestra loft,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>and a choir loft that = seats about 500...but again no organ.&nbsp; Finally, the</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>pastor and I walk about 200 feet across the stage to the area behind the</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>concert grand piano, = and here sits a little, old, dusty, Hammond C-3, with a</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>single Leslie = speaker.&nbsp; About half of the finish was scraped off this little</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>organ and the speaker.&nbsp; It wasn't even plugged in.&nbsp; I was pretty let down.</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>It was NOTHING like I = expected.</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>So here is my = question...&nbsp;&nbsp; Is it possible to get a good, vibrant sound out</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>of this thing, that = will at all enhance this church's dynamic music program,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>that doesn't sound too = "hammondy"?&nbsp; If so, does anyone know the proper</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>registrations that = would make traditional hymn sound triumphant, and grand?</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>The church has stated = that it would not replace the organ.&nbsp; It has</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>sentimental value = because it has survived a massive tornado that destroyed</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>the whole church, and = killed a few ladies- including the organist.&nbsp; It even</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>survived a fire, which = also destroyed the entire church, but not the organ.</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Any input would be = appreciated.</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Thanks, Josh = White</font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------20881B4A50E58AD6A84DE4C6--    
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "conmara" <conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 15:13:46 -0600   Josh -   They can't replace the organ - but perhaps it deserves some new ranks.   How can it make a joyful noise with just one speaker - when it deserves a thousands of pipes to sing with? After surviving such a horrific event - who can say what music lies hidden in the instrument? But they'll never hear it in this condition.   KenMc   Pologaptommy@aol.com wrote: > > Perhaps one of you guys can help me... > I have recently took over a position on the organ at a large church > > (around 2,500). I just about died when I saw this "organ." I walked > into > the huge church (which seats 3,750 people) and was taken in by the 50 > foot > ceilings in the foyer, the crystal chandeliers, and the gigantic grand > > staircase leading to the balcony which wraps around the inside of the > sanctuary like a mezzanine. So I was beginning to get a pretty good > idea of > what the organ would be like...Next I walk through the double doors > (one out > of about 50) into the sanctuary and I am awestruck at the immense size > of the > stage...I saw no visible organ pipes, and no organ for that matter- > what I > did see was a white kawai concert grand, a huge drum set, an orchestra > loft, > and a choir loft that seats about 500...but again no organ. Finally, > the > pastor and I walk about 200 feet across the stage to the area behind > the > concert grand piano, and here sits a little, old, dusty, Hammond C-3, > with a > single Leslie speaker. About half of the finish was scraped off this > little > organ and the speaker. It wasn't even plugged in. I was pretty let > down. > It was NOTHING like I expected. > So here is my question... Is it possible to get a good, vibrant > sound out > of this thing, that will at all enhance this church's dynamic music > program, > that doesn't sound too "hammondy"? If so, does anyone know the proper > > registrations that would make traditional hymn sound triumphant, and > grand? > The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has > sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that > destroyed > the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. It > even > survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the > organ. > Any input would be appreciated. > Thanks, Josh White  
(back) Subject: undying Hammonds, cont. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 12:16:01 -0800   OTOH, if you have a live orchestra, you don't really NEED an organ (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: (no subject) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 14:16:04 -0600   Josh: You're making this up, right? Peter      
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 15:34:21 -0400   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1227524025=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" ; format=3D"flowed"   > >The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has >sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that = destroyed >the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. It = even >survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the = organ. ....   >Josh White   Hasn't it occurred to them that God was trying to tell them something? Or maybe he just missed--twice.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1227524025=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/enriched; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <excerpt>   <fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has   sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that destroyed   the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. It even   survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the organ.   </smaller></fontfamily></excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>.= ..     <excerpt>Josh White   </excerpt>   </smaller></fontfamily>Hasn't it occurred to them that God was trying to tell them something? Or maybe he just missed--twice.   Randy Runyon   organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati   runyonr@muohio.edu   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1227524025=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D--  
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 15:41:59 -0500       Pologaptommy@aol.com wrote: > > > The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has > sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that > destroyed > the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. > It even > survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the > organ.     It just goes to show you... They don't make 'em like they used to.   If you want the position, forget about traditional - Boogie On!   However, in case of some threatening weather it would seem prudent to seek shelter in some place OTHER than that church on the off chance that the Hammond may be be attracting it.   Stan  
(back) Subject: Dennis James/Silent Film Concerts to debut restored METROPOLIS in San Francisco From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 16:19:44 EST   Dennis James' Silent Film Concerts has been selected to score and perform th= e=20 U.S. debut of the new METROPOLIS silent film restoration   The U.S. premier presentation of the newly restored silent film masterpiece-= =20 Fritz Lang's METROPOLIS- has been scheduled for Friday, April 20 at the=20 Castro Theatre in San Francisco as part of the 2001 San Francisco=20 International Film Festival. The color-tinted print was debuted in February= =20 at the Berlinalepalast as part of the Berlin Film Festival.   According to film researcher Hyde Flippo, " . . . the METROPOLIS that=20 moviegoers and reviewers of the 1920s saw varied from country to country and= =20 place to place. Lang's cut was no doubt far too long to begin with, but the=20 American version was severely cut to ten reels from the original 17,=20 seriously disturbing the film's rhythm and making it impossible for U.S.=20 viewers to make any sense out of the already convoluted plot. One unfortunat= e=20 result of all this snipping: some segments of the film seem to have been los= t=20 forever, with some scenes today existing in restorations only as still shots= ..=20 Nevertheless, enough of the Expressionist film masterpiece remains to allow=20 us to appreciate Lang's cinematic craftsmanship."*   Dennis James' Silent Film Concerts organization has been commissioned to=20 create a new theatre organ plus electronics score incorporating=20 keyboard-effective excerpts from the original orchestral score by Huppertz=20 and other period musical elements coupled with newly composed music and=20 effects. The score is being written to be performed by the Filmharmonia Duo= =20 (Dennis James and Garry Eister) especially to showcase the Castro Theatre's=20 famous Mighty WurliTzer pipe organ.   The Castro Theatre is located at 429 Castro Street in San Francisco between=20 Market Street and 18th Street. For more theatre information, please call=20 415-621-6120, or visit Castro Theatre Home Page: http://www.thecastro.com   Transportation instructions and map to the theatre:=20 http://www.silentfilm.org/castro.htm   -----   FILMHARMONIA DUO performs musical accompaniments to classic silent films by=20 recapturing the silent film era's sounds and musical styles when merging=20 surviving historical materials with modern compositions. A FILMHARMONIA DUO= =20 presentation combines traditional acoustic instruments (piano or theatre pip= e=20 organ) with rare antiques (Theremin, Cristal Baschet, Ondes Martenot, etc.))= =20 and modern electronics (Buchla Lightning and various modern electronic music= =20 devices) giving the ensemble the unique ability to recreate, for modern=20 audiences, an historically based silent film experience coupled with=20 contemporary film music scoring elements. The FILMHARMONIA DUO works closel= y=20 with film preservationists and exhibitors to present the finest restored=20 prints to creating a theatrical experience that revives silent films'=20 thrilling original conception.   Ensemble founder Dennis James (co-composer, organ, electronics) has made a=20 performing career out of the delight in discovery, taking up challenging=20 musical instruments that have fallen into disuse but for which there remain=20= a=20 viable repertoire. He plays an eclectic assortment, ranging from theatre=20 pipe organ to the theremin (the pioneering Soviet electronic instrument=20 played by waving one's hands in the air). Emerging on the international=20 music scene in 1991 with over fifty music festival appearances from New=20 York's Lincoln Center to concert halls in London, Salzburg and Vienna, Denni= s=20 James has developed a major concert, recording, and lecture career that span= s=20 the globe.   James has played a pivotal role in the international revival of silent films= =20 with live music. Beginning as a solo pianist for campus screenings at=20 Indiana University during the late 1960s, James now tours world-wide under=20 auspices of his own SILENT FILM CONCERTS production company presenting=20 feature silent film programs with solo piano and theatre organ, chamber=20 ensemble and full symphony orchestra musical accompaniments. Performing=20 silent films with orchestras since 1971 throughout the U.S.A., Canada, Mexic= o=20 and Europe, James offers the most comprehensive program listings in the fiel= d.   ----   Garry Eister (co-composer / electronics) has a Ph.D. in Music Composition=20 from the University of California at Santa Barbara where he studied with=20 Peter Fricker, Gordon Crosse, Emma Lou Diemer, and Edward Applebaum. Eister= =20 lives in Arroyo Grande, California and has served as composer-in-residence=20 and/or music director for several professional and community theatres and ha= s=20 worked as a part-time instructor at UCSB, Cal State Long Beach, Cal Poly San= =20 Luis Obispo, and Cuesta College. As a composer/performer, Eister has toured= =20 Europe four times with Daniel Lentz and his ensembles. Eister's multi-media= =20 collaborations with sculptor mark Bryan have been seen and heard in gallerie= s=20 and museums in Sacramento, Santa Monica, Riverside, Beverly Hills and=20 Cambria, California. To date, his dramatic monologue, The Good Guy Speaks,=20 has received approximately thirty performances by actors Bruce Jones, Robert= =20 Moore and Charles Leggett in Seattle, San Luis Obispo, Stockton and Concord,= =20 California.   Garry Eister's compositions have been performed by the Cleveland Chamber=20 Symphony, the USC New Music Ensemble, Daniel Lentz's ensembles, pianist=20 Arlene Dunlap, flautist Fred Lau, percussionist Doug Ovens, and the=20 Synchronia new music ensemble of St. Louis. Conductor Thomas Davies and the= =20 Cuesta Master Chorale have commissioned Eister twice: in the Winter of 1995=20 they premiered his full-length opera, Moby Dick; and in the Autumn of 1996=20 the Chorale presented Eister's cantata, Omnes Populi at their inaugural=20 performance in the new San Luis Obispo Performing Arts Center. Eister's=20 second opera, The Father of Lies, was commissioned premiered by the Coastal=20 Access Musician's Alliance at the Monday Club in San Luis Obispo. Eister's=20 third opera, The Glass Harmonica, was commissioned by, and premiered at, the= =20 San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival in the Summer of 1997 under the baton of=20 festival director and co-founder Clifton Swanson. Eister's vocal works and=20 operas have been performed by singers Jonathan Mack, John Duykers, Maria=20 Jette, Hector Vasquez, Kathy Berata, Susan Azaret Davies, Kenneth Knight, an= d=20 Mary Rawcliffe. Eister's compositions have been broadcast by the national=20 radios of Norway, Sweden, Belgium and Holland. His music and radio theatre=20 works have also been heard on KPFK in Los Angeles, KPFA in Berkeley, KCBX in= =20 San Luis Obispo, and WMUH in Allentown, PA. =20   For additional production information and future performances, contact:=20   Silent Film Concerts 3707 5th Avenue, #412 San Diego, CA 92103 619-234-1396 / muscur@aol.com   ------ *Copyright =A9 1997, 1998 Hyde Flippo=20    
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 16:54:41 EST     --part1_6d.10bbb9d8.27e142a1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/14/01 2:49:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, Pologaptommy@aol.com writes:     > The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. It has > sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that = destroyed > the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. It = even > survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the = organ. >   Perhaps not replace this poor little thing..... I think that an instrument =   commensurate with the rest of the church would be appropriate, NEXT to the =   relic!   Vicki Ceruti   --part1_6d.10bbb9d8.27e142a1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated = 3/14/01 2:49:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>Pologaptommy@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The church has = stated that it would not replace the organ. &nbsp;It has <BR>sentimental value because it has survived a massive tornado that = destroyed <BR>the whole church, and killed a few ladies- including the organist. = &nbsp;It even <BR>survived a fire, which also destroyed the entire church, but not the = organ. <BR>Any input would be appreciated</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Perhaps not replace this poor little thing..... I think that an = instrument <BR>commensurate with the rest of the church would be appropriate, NEXT to = the <BR>relic! <BR> <BR>Vicki Ceruti</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6d.10bbb9d8.27e142a1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Ben van Oosten: review of review From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 16:55:28 -0500 (EST)       Arthur LaMirande wrote, in part:   >I don't attend many organ recitals in New York City --- usually pretty dull affairs! --- but last night, intrigued by some FREE publicity given to the event by the august New York Times, I attended one. Given by an organist from Holland, Ben van Oosten, and performed on the van den Heuvel organ (which I had not previously heard) at the Episcopal Church of the Holy Apostles in the Chelsea area of Manhattan.   I'm glad I went. Mr. van Oosten turned out to be a bona fide virtuoso on the organ. Any organist who can play an entire program without a wrong note in sight (or should I say, hearing) has something going for him. =   <snip>       I am hoping that the above review is meant to be tongue-in-cheek; or simply contains an unfortunate choice of words. The celebrated Ben van Oosten is just "..an organist from Holland..." who "...turned out to be a bona fide virtuoso" in the opinion of Mr. LaMirande?   Is it possible that the reviewer has not previously heard of Ben van Oosten, widely considered the one of the world's leading authorities on Widor and Vierne, and a deeply respected scholar, author, and performer? I for one consider his monograph on Widor a landmark of organ studies, and his recordings of the Vierne symphonies are cornerstones of my CD collection, and should be of everyone's!   I'm so gratified that Arthur feels that Mr. van Oosten "has something going for him." One or two of us in the field happen to agree. Is he also of the opinion that the Pope is a devout Roman Catholic?   I must say, given the humorous (?) tone of the opening, I find it hard to take seriously the comments in the review that took issue with repertoire, registration, voicing of the organ, acoustics, and tempi...and Mr. van Oosten's alleged 'ignorance' of one of Arthur's favorite von Beckerath organs!   Finally, as someone who was born and raised in New York and recently returned to take a position there, I do not at all agree that most recitals in NYC are "dull affairs"--except when "an organist from Holland" happens to wander through. I have been to a number of excellent programs since the fall, and am very honored and delighted to be in town!   I was unexpectedly detained from attending Mr. van Oosten's recital due to a pressing (and difficult) family situation which arose yesterday; and I feel the loss keenly. If any other listmembers were there, I would deeply appreciate reading a serious review of what I am sure was a spectacularly well chosen, registered, and executed program.     Best wishes,   Jonathan B. Hall, FAGO      
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 17:06:20 EST   In a message dated 3/14/01 2:49:28 PM EST, Pologaptommy@aol.com writes:   > So here is my question... Is it possible to get a good, vibrant sound = out > of this thing, that will at all enhance this church's dynamic music program, > > that doesn't sound too "hammondy"? If so, does anyone know the proper > registrations that would make traditional hymn sound triumphant, and = grand? > The church has stated that it would not replace the organ. (with tongue FIRMLY in cheek)... That's why they are replacing the ORGANIST (suprise!).   If you can play good jazz-style, you should feel at home on a C-3 which is = a B-3 in 'church' clothing. It will not sound like a pipe organ NO MATTER = WHAT you do...   BUT if you are willing to blend into the Praise-band thing they have = going, you may be happy.   Best wishes.   Rick M Staunton VA