PipeChat Digest #1894 - Thursday, March 15, 2001
 
Re: Improvisation/literature
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1893 - 03/15/01
  by <StatRussell@aol.com>
Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: CANADA/misconstrue/dish
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1893 - 03/15/01
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Review of bReWsE's review of review of review
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: playing by ear
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Hammond
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: toward a theology of organ recitals
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Improvisation/literature From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:09:07 EST     --part1_87.8365067.27e2a593_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Since improvisation has come up:   May I refer all to the (strictly unorthodox) improvisation (my own) at   http://mp3.com/arthurlamirande   or   http://www.mp3.com/arthurlamirande   The website also includes my performance (on November 20, 2000) of the = entire Chaconne by Franz Schmidt, recorded on the magnificent organ (1900 Karn-Warren, restored 1997 - 2000 by Casavant) of the Holy Rosary = Cathedral, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. A church with excellent acoustics.   The improvisation was inspired by the Psalm for the 33rd Sunday of = Ordinary time (Nov. 19th in 2000): "You will show me the path of life, the fullness = of joy in your presence, at your right hand happiness forever." (Psalm 15 in =   the Roman Catholic Psalter; Psalm 16 in the King James and Oxford = versions.)   Thank you, Bruce, for your posting today. I glad that at least some = people can read plain English! (I wonder how those who can't make out with Shakespeare and Milton? Or, say, William Faulkner?)   I was practicing this afternoon, at a Catholic church near my home where = they are kind enough to give me practice privileges several days a week, asking =   nothing in return from me. (Although I do give them a contribution at Christmas and Easter.) The church has excellent acoustics --- several seconds of reverberation = --- and a fine Casavant organ. But I won't divulge the name.   I was rehearsing pieces for upcoming recitals, and it occurred to me how = much of the organ literature is completely ignored by American organists. = Nearly all of the 20th-century German/Austrian repertory, for instance. Aside = from Reger and Hindemith, how often do you hear such repertory on American = concert programs? I venture to suggest: not often. I've been introducing Franz Schmidt to the country, but nobody seems terribly interested in following = my lead. Such a pity. Of course, perhaps Schmidt is too difficult for them!   Today, I was practicing a major work by a pupil of Schmidt: Walter Pach. = He was, for many years, organist of the great Gothic church in Vienna, the Votivkirche; and he also edited many of the organ works of Franz Schmidt = for publication. (In fact, I received from him the correct tempos for several = of the Schmidt scores --- not printed in the published scores --- while he = was still alive, back in the early 1970s.)   This particular work is entitled Praeambel und Chaconne, and it is a tremendously powerful composition. Mainly atonal --- there is no key signature --- but there are suggestions of tonality and the work finally = ends on a triumphant G-Major chord. If anyone is in the Washington DC area on September 9th, I will perform = this work at the National (Episcopal) Cathedral that day (5 p.m.), along with = the Franz Schmidt Chaconne. (I understand it is the policy of the cathedral = not to allow any hooting or hissing!)   Other composers I could list include Georg Trexler; Karl Ho"ller; = Siegfried Reda; Johann Nepomuk David; Augustinus Franz Kropfreiter; and numerous others. Why do we almost never hear them on American organ recitals? Is = it ignorance? Intellectual laziness?   One hears, on recital programs, the same relatively narrow repertory repeated, over and over again, ad infinitum.   Another piece on which I was working today was one of the great = masterpieces of the 19th-century French repertory: Franck's Grande Piece Symphonique. That's another one which crops up rather infrequently on American organ recitals. Well, it certainly is a challenging work to play --- and, = sadly, many organists (including some of the big names in the field) don't seem = to like challenges. Furthermore, without the acoustics of a French = cathedral, the work loses much of its effect.   Raymond Daveluy played it last summer at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal = --- where there is plenty of reverberation! To overwhelming effect. My very favorite performance is that recorded, many years ago, by the late Jeanne Demessieux on the great Cavaille'-Coll organ of La Madeleine in Paris. A tremendously exciting performance! I try to base my own on hers. (I also have a recording by Jean Langlais, made on Franck's own organ at Ste. Clothilde. He plays the finale at a lugubrious tempo, and it falls flat.)   Well, brethren, I am off to Toronto for the weekend.   Pax vobiscum.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_87.8365067.27e2a593_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Since improvisation has = come up: <BR> <BR>May I refer all to the (strictly unorthodox) improvisation (my own) at <BR> <BR>http://mp3.com/arthurlamirande <BR> <BR>or <BR> <BR>http://www.mp3.com/arthurlamirande <BR> <BR>The website also includes my performance (on November 20, 2000) of the = entire <BR>Chaconne by Franz Schmidt, recorded on the magnificent organ (1900 <BR>Karn-Warren, restored 1997 - 2000 &nbsp;by Casavant) of the Holy = Rosary Cathedral, <BR>Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. &nbsp;A church with excellent = acoustics. <BR> <BR>The improvisation was inspired by the Psalm for the 33rd Sunday of = Ordinary <BR>time (Nov. 19th in 2000): "You will show me the path of life, the = fullness of <BR>joy in your presence, at your right hand happiness forever." = &nbsp;(Psalm 15 in <BR>the Roman Catholic Psalter; Psalm 16 in the King James and Oxford = versions.) <BR> <BR>Thank you, Bruce, for your posting today. &nbsp;I glad that at least = some people <BR>can read plain English! &nbsp;(I wonder how those who can't make out = with <BR>Shakespeare and Milton? &nbsp;Or, say, William Faulkner?) <BR> <BR>I was practicing this afternoon, at a Catholic church near my home = where they <BR>are kind enough to give me practice privileges several days a week, = asking <BR>nothing in return from me. &nbsp;(Although I do give them a = contribution at <BR>Christmas and Easter.) <BR>The church has excellent acoustics --- several seconds of = reverberation --- <BR>and a fine Casavant organ. &nbsp;But I won't divulge the name. <BR> <BR>I was rehearsing pieces for upcoming recitals, and it occurred to me = how much <BR>of the organ literature is completely ignored by American organists. = &nbsp;Nearly <BR>all of the 20th-century German/Austrian repertory, for instance. = &nbsp;Aside from <BR>Reger and Hindemith, how often do you hear such repertory on American = concert <BR>programs? &nbsp;I venture to suggest: not often. &nbsp;I've been = introducing Franz <BR>Schmidt to the country, but nobody seems terribly interested in = following my <BR>lead. &nbsp;Such a pity. &nbsp;Of course, perhaps Schmidt is too = difficult for them! <BR> <BR>Today, I was practicing a major work by a pupil of Schmidt: Walter = Pach. &nbsp;He <BR>was, for many years, organist of the great Gothic church in Vienna, = the <BR>Votivkirche; and he also edited many of the organ works of Franz = Schmidt for <BR>publication. &nbsp;(In fact, I received from him the correct tempos = for several of <BR>the Schmidt scores --- not printed in the published scores --- while = he was <BR>still alive, back in the early 1970s.) <BR> <BR>This particular work is entitled Praeambel und Chaconne, and it is a <BR>tremendously powerful composition. &nbsp;Mainly atonal --- there is no = key <BR>signature --- but there are suggestions of tonality and the work = finally ends <BR>on a triumphant G-Major chord. <BR>If anyone is in the Washington DC area on September 9th, I will = perform this <BR>work at the National (Episcopal) Cathedral that day (5 p.m.), along = with the <BR>Franz Schmidt Chaconne. &nbsp;(I understand it is the policy of the = cathedral not <BR>to allow any hooting or hissing!) <BR> <BR>Other composers I could list include Georg Trexler; Karl Ho"ller; = Siegfried <BR>Reda; Johann Nepomuk David; Augustinus Franz Kropfreiter; and numerous =   <BR>others. &nbsp;Why do we almost never hear them on American organ = recitals? &nbsp;Is it <BR>ignorance? &nbsp;Intellectual laziness? <BR> <BR>One hears, on recital programs, the same relatively narrow repertory <BR>repeated, over and over again, ad infinitum. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Another piece on which I was working today was one of the great = masterpieces <BR>of the 19th-century French repertory: Franck's Grande Piece = Symphonique. &nbsp; <BR>That's another one which crops up rather infrequently on American = organ <BR>recitals. &nbsp;Well, it certainly is a challenging work to play --- = and, sadly, <BR>many organists (including some of the big names in the field) don't = seem to <BR>like challenges. &nbsp;Furthermore, without the acoustics of a French = cathedral, <BR>the work loses much of its effect. <BR> <BR>Raymond Daveluy played it last summer at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, = Montreal --- <BR>where there is plenty of reverberation! &nbsp;To overwhelming effect. = &nbsp;My very <BR>favorite performance is that recorded, many years ago, by the late = Jeanne <BR>Demessieux on the great Cavaille'-Coll organ of La Madeleine in Paris. = &nbsp;A <BR>tremendously exciting performance! <BR>I try to base my own on hers. &nbsp;(I also have a recording by Jean = Langlais, <BR>made on Franck's own organ at Ste. Clothilde. &nbsp;He plays the = finale at a <BR>lugubrious tempo, and it falls flat.) <BR> <BR>Well, brethren, I am off to Toronto for the weekend. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Pax vobiscum. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_87.8365067.27e2a593_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:08:54 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_002B_01C0AD7A.FF267660 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Can somebody tell me what the last note in the left and right hands are? = =3D I've got a doubled third (B in both hands), and I'm wondering if it's =3D correct....   Thanks,   Rebekah   ------=3D_NextPart_000_002B_01C0AD7A.FF267660 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Can somebody tell me what the last note in the left = =3D and right=3D20 hands are? I've got a doubled third (B in both hands), and I'm wondering = =3D if it's=3D20 correct....</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Thanks,</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Rebekah</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_002B_01C0AD7A.FF267660--    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1893 - 03/15/01 From: <StatRussell@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:24:18 EST     --part1_ea.12c0c510.27e2a922_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Go for it Arthur!!! I'm with you Buddy!!   Dennis   --part1_ea.12c0c510.27e2a922_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Go for it Arthur!!! = &nbsp;I'm with you Buddy!! <BR> <BR>Dennis</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ea.12c0c510.27e2a922_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:35:21 -0500   Ya gotta hit a C# with the big toe on yer left foot on the Choir manual. = Or, is that the right foot -I fergit.   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Rebekah Ingram <rringram@syr.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 6:08 PM Subject: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"     Can somebody tell me what the last note in the left and right hands are? I've got a doubled third (B in both hands), and I'm wondering if it's correct....   Thanks,   Rebekah      
(back) Subject: Re: CANADA/misconstrue/dish From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 15:53:32 -0800 (PST)   I didn't take any umbrage to Arthur's letter. In fact, I'm glad that he has shown up for organ recitals and supported his colleagues. We should all do the same. Sorry if I misinterpreted some of his remarks. Anyway, we should all go to each other's recitals!   --- ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > Thanks to that gentleman in Ontario for reminding us > Yanks that letters > mailed to Canada from the U.S. should include CANADA > on the address label. > Very true. > > Similarly, letters sent to China should say > "People's Republic of China"! > And it's probably a good idea to put "U.K." in any > letters addressed to > Scotland or Northern Ireland! > > I do think that I write reasonably lucid English > prose; so it always amazes > me how easily some individuals miscontrue my words. > When I referred to Mr. > van Oosten's having given a performance remarkably > free of note errors, I > most certainly did not mean to say, or imply, that a > note-perfect > performance, ipso facto, makes for an artistic > performance. Indeed, if one > just read the following paragraph, one would observe > that I made it a point > to say, and I quote: "his approach to the > music...showed genuine insight, and > his registrations were imaginative and INVARIABLY > APPROPRIATE TO THE MUSIC AT > HAND." My point having been, and I hope this time > it becomes clear: it was > amazing to encounter an artist with such remarkable > ability as to play with > insight and imagination and still be able to avoid > any wrong notes! > According to one poster who wrote today: even > Horowitz couldn't do this!!! > > Actually, my review of van Oosten's recital was > highly laudatory. I am truly > astounded that anyone could take exception to it. > The only things of which I > was critical were choice of program, title of > program, and the acoustics of > the room. Everything I said about the artist's > performance per se conveyed > high praise for a job well done! > > Oh, evidently, some people took umbrage because I > was previously unfamiliar > with this performer's name. Well, as I said, I > rarely attend organ recitals. > Much prefer a piano recital, symphony concert, or > the opera. Particularly > as most North American churches seem to have very > poor acoustics for organ > sound. > > As for my mention of the Beckerath in Montreal: > again, the objector missed my > point entirely. (I wouldn't have thought that such > clearly expressed points > could prove so elusive!) I quoted Mr. van Oosten > himself as saying that he > particularly enjoyed playing on Beckerath organs. > And that I asked the > artist himself, after his recital, if he had yet had > the opportunity to > hear/play the Beckerath magnum opus (which happens > to be the one in > l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal). And when he > replied that he hadn't, I > urged him to go there and do so; and he replied to > me that he would, indeed, > like to do so at his earliest opportunity. > > That's all there was to it! Big deal, eh? > > Finally, I have to observe that there are some > people who can dish it out, > but they certainly can't take it! I wouldn't be so > imprudent, of course, as > to name names! > > But there's one organ recitalist whose programs I'll > be avoiding like the > plague, from now on. I won't mention the bloke's > name; but I will reveal > that he took me to task on this forum, within the > past 24 hours, for my > "unfair" review of Ben van Oosten! > > He really should read how they write music reviews > in The New York Times. > Thjere, he would learn what unfairness is all about. > (He needn't worry, > though: they hardly ever go to organ concerts.) > > Arthur LaMirande >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1893 - 03/15/01 From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:55:55 -0500     --------------752A63225DCE4F548FA3C60A Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   If I may suggest to you, Mr. Russell, that there are those of us who do not receive posts from this list in Digest form, but as individual emails with relevant subject titles. Your practice of responding to posts under the subject of the Digest number leaves many of us guessing as to the purpose or true subject of your reply. The below quoted post from you is a prime example of why your posts to PIPECHAT need to be more accurately referenced. We most certainly welcome your input, but ask your consideration for those who do not have time to make each of your posts a reference research project.   Thank you kindly Mike Gettelman   StatRussell@aol.com wrote:   > Go for it Arthur!!! I'm with you Buddy!! > > Dennis   --------------752A63225DCE4F548FA3C60A Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> If I may suggest to you, Mr. Russell, that there are those of us who do not receive posts from this list in Digest form, but as individual emails with relevant subject titles. Your practice of responding to posts under the subject of the Digest number leaves many of us guessing as to the = purpose or true subject of your reply. <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The below quoted post from you is a prime example of why your posts to PIPECHAT need to be more&nbsp; accurately referenced. We most certainly welcome your input, but ask your consideration for those who do not have time to make each of your posts a reference research = project. <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Thank you kindly <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mike Gettelman <p>StatRussell@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Go = for it Arthur!!!&nbsp; I'm with you Buddy!!</font></font> <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D-1>Dennis</font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------752A63225DCE4F548FA3C60A--    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:17:06 -0800   At 06:35 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Ya gotta hit a C# with the big toe on yer left foot on the Choir manual. = Or, >is that the right foot -I fergit.<snip>   Uh...just WHAT Buxtehude are YOU playing these days???   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:17:03 -0800   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_105802=3D= =3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   At 06:08 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Can somebody tell me what the last note in the left and right hands are? >I've got a doubled third (B in both hands), and I'm wondering if it's >correct....<snip>   It's incorrect, at least in the Peters Edition by Keller. LH: G-D, RH: = B-G.   DeserTBoB --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_105802=3D= =3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> At 06:08 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote:<br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><font size=3D2>Can somebody tell = me what the last note in the left and right hands are? I've got a doubled third (B in both hands), and I'm wondering if it's correct....&lt;snip&gt;</font></blockquote><br> It's incorrect, at least in the Peters Edition by Keller.&nbsp; LH:&nbsp; G-D, RH: B-G.<br> <br> DeserTBoB</html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_105802=3D= =3D_.ALT--    
(back) Subject: Review of bReWsE's review of review of review From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:16:53 -0800   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_106338=3D= =3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   At 02:21 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, BaWLd-OnE bReWsE wrote: >I really don't see how Arthur's review was offensive or uninformed. He >was objective about the quality of playing, the organ and deficiencies of = the >room. His opinion about the choice of literature for that particular = organ >and acoustic. These types of comments are useful to all organists who = plan >recital programs. There was nothing unkind in his comments that I saw. ><snip>   I concur. In addition, I thought it was well written. While it did state =   opinions on various subjects, it was free of the hyperbole I see in many such "reviews".   DeserTBoB --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_106338=3D= =3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> At 02:21 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, BaWLd-OnE bReWsE wrote:<br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><font face=3D"Arial, = Helvetica">I really don't see how Arthur's review was offensive or uninformed.&nbsp; He was objective about the quality of playing, the organ and deficiencies of the <br> room.&nbsp;&nbsp; His opinion about the choice of literature for that particular organ <br> and acoustic.&nbsp;&nbsp; These types of comments are useful to all organists who plan <br> recital programs.&nbsp;&nbsp; There was nothing unkind in his comments that I saw. &lt;snip&gt;</font></blockquote><br> I concur.&nbsp; In addition, I thought it was well written.&nbsp; While it did state opinions on various subjects, it was free of the hyperbole I see in many such &quot;reviews&quot;.<br> <br> DeserTBoB</html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_106338=3D= =3D_.ALT--    
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:16:52 -0800   At 10:39 AM 3/15/2001 -0800, BuuD-by-the-Beach wrote: >I have a confession to make: I played by ear too <snip>   Me too, but it's OK...it's legal now.   Seriously, "ear" playing is a talent that many teachers would try to "drum =   out" of students in the old days! "Read, don't listen..." was some bad advice I got from one teacher, who I promptly dumped. It's amazing how many concert grade musicians can't "pick up" a tune, no matter how many times they hear it, and have to always rely on a score.   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:16:48 -0800   At 10:44 AM 3/15/2001 -0600, you wrote: >There certainly is nothing like a Hammond. Built like a tank, and very >nice sounding as well,<snip>   ....and becoming more troublesome day by day. These things are way past their prime, and new problems are surfacing all the time. The latest: Leaky paraffin-potted power transformers in the preamps and lots of "wax glob" capacitors that are drifting ever faster towards uselessness. This issue has recently been in the news over in HamTech to an ever greater degree. Example: I have a very nice living room '65 B-3 = I want to turn over (meaning get rid of), but can't, because the power transformer has become unacceptably leaky. I decided to do some research, =   and my findings weren't surprising. The paraffin wax, over time, has adsorbed enough atmospheric moisture to become conductive, thus giving the =   player a nice little tingle every time the unit is plugged in and the player is grounded in any way. There also appears to be a long-term chemical reaction between the wire varnish and the paraffin, exacerbating the problem.   Five years ago, I never saw a Hammond with this problem; I've run into = five this year that have. Thus, I'm out of the Hammond business permanently, = as it's no longer a "high profit, slather 'em up with Liquid Gold 'n sell = 'em" business.   Nothing lasts forever...even Hammonds!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: toward a theology of organ recitals From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:16:46 -0800   At 11:43 AM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote: >They are not only too loud but way too fast!<snip>   The next time I hear some punky kid bashing Widor's Toccata from the 5th along at 230 bpm, I think I shall bash the recitalist...with a Louisville Slugger!   Appreciating the value of proper tempi,   DeserTBoB