PipeChat Digest #1895 - Thursday, March 15, 2001
 
Heaven (well almost)
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Improvisation vs. playing "by ear"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Childhood church in NY
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear"
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Practice Organ Options
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Creative Name Needed
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Paris on a Sunday
  by "Tim Rand" <tim@minn.net>
Re: Heaven (well almost)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Info. on Organ in MO
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Practice Organ Options
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
RE: Practice Organ Options
  by "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk>
RE: Practice Organ Options
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Fw: toward a theology of organ recitals
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear"
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Church Job (was Practice Organ)
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: Info. on Organ in MO
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Heaven (well almost) From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:33:47 -0800 (PST)   Hi-   Just wanted to let you all know that I got to play the church's organ again today! I don't know how I am going to wait a week until my next lesson.   Ahhhhhh!!!What bliss!! I thought about alot of your comments while I was playing...I tried to just enjoy listening and playing...but when you make a mistake on those things....it's loud!!!!   Counting the days until my next lesson..... --- ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > Since improvisation has come up: > > May I refer all to the (strictly unorthodox) > improvisation (my own) at > > http://mp3.com/arthurlamirande > > or > > http://www.mp3.com/arthurlamirande > > The website also includes my performance (on > November 20, 2000) of the entire > Chaconne by Franz Schmidt, recorded on the > magnificent organ (1900 > Karn-Warren, restored 1997 - 2000 by Casavant) of > the Holy Rosary Cathedral, > Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. A church with > excellent acoustics. > > The improvisation was inspired by the Psalm for the > 33rd Sunday of Ordinary > time (Nov. 19th in 2000): "You will show me the path > of life, the fullness of > joy in your presence, at your right hand happiness > forever." (Psalm 15 in > the Roman Catholic Psalter; Psalm 16 in the King > James and Oxford versions.) > > Thank you, Bruce, for your posting today. I glad > that at least some people > can read plain English! (I wonder how those who > can't make out with > Shakespeare and Milton? Or, say, William Faulkner?) > > I was practicing this afternoon, at a Catholic > church near my home where they > are kind enough to give me practice privileges > several days a week, asking > nothing in return from me. (Although I do give them > a contribution at > Christmas and Easter.) > The church has excellent acoustics --- several > seconds of reverberation --- > and a fine Casavant organ. But I won't divulge the > name. > > I was rehearsing pieces for upcoming recitals, and > it occurred to me how much > of the organ literature is completely ignored by > American organists. Nearly > all of the 20th-century German/Austrian repertory, > for instance. Aside from > Reger and Hindemith, how often do you hear such > repertory on American concert > programs? I venture to suggest: not often. I've > been introducing Franz > Schmidt to the country, but nobody seems terribly > interested in following my > lead. Such a pity. Of course, perhaps Schmidt is > too difficult for them! > > Today, I was practicing a major work by a pupil of > Schmidt: Walter Pach. He > was, for many years, organist of the great Gothic > church in Vienna, the > Votivkirche; and he also edited many of the organ > works of Franz Schmidt for > publication. (In fact, I received from him the > correct tempos for several of > the Schmidt scores --- not printed in the published > scores --- while he was > still alive, back in the early 1970s.) > > This particular work is entitled Praeambel und > Chaconne, and it is a > tremendously powerful composition. Mainly atonal > --- there is no key > signature --- but there are suggestions of tonality > and the work finally ends > on a triumphant G-Major chord. > If anyone is in the Washington DC area on September > 9th, I will perform this > work at the National (Episcopal) Cathedral that day > (5 p.m.), along with the > Franz Schmidt Chaconne. (I understand it is the > policy of the cathedral not > to allow any hooting or hissing!) > > Other composers I could list include Georg Trexler; > Karl Ho"ller; Siegfried > Reda; Johann Nepomuk David; Augustinus Franz > Kropfreiter; and numerous > others. Why do we almost never hear them on > American organ recitals? Is it > ignorance? Intellectual laziness? > > One hears, on recital programs, the same relatively > narrow repertory > repeated, over and over again, ad infinitum. > > Another piece on which I was working today was one > of the great masterpieces > of the 19th-century French repertory: Franck's > Grande Piece Symphonique. > That's another one which crops up rather > infrequently on American organ > recitals. Well, it certainly is a challenging work > to play --- and, sadly, > many organists (including some of the big names in > the field) don't seem to > like challenges. Furthermore, without the acoustics > of a French cathedral, > the work loses much of its effect. > > Raymond Daveluy played it last summer at l'Oratoire > St. Joseph, Montreal --- > where there is plenty of reverberation! To > overwhelming effect. My very > favorite performance is that recorded, many years > ago, by the late Jeanne > Demessieux on the great Cavaille'-Coll organ of La > Madeleine in Paris. A > tremendously exciting performance! > I try to base my own on hers. (I also have a > recording by Jean Langlais, > made on Franck's own organ at Ste. Clothilde. He > plays the finale at a > lugubrious tempo, and it falls flat.) > > Well, brethren, I am off to Toronto for the weekend. > > > Pax vobiscum. > > Arthur LaMirande >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 19:33:40 EST   Two very different things, two entirely different skills.  
(back) Subject: Childhood church in NY From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:37:55 -0800 (PST)   Hi-   I am wondering if anyone knows about the organ in a small Presbyterian Church in Flushing, NY (Long Island) I went there as a child as well as Memorial Pres. in MO (someone knew about this particular organ)   Anyway, just curious. I think the church was on Murray or Murrey street. As far as I know, the church is still there.     --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE CITY OF NEW > YORK > presents > > Johann Sebastian Bach's final choral masterpiece, > the > > MASS in b minor > > Sunday afternoon, 18 March, 2001 at Four O'Clock > > Ellen Goff Entriken, soprano > Cheryl Zilinyi, mezzo-soprano > Johnny Maldonado, countertenor > Michael Smallwood, tenor > Andrew Martens, bass > > Walter Hilse, organ > > The Choir of The First Presbyterian Church > The First Church Orchestra > William F. Entriken, DMA, Organist and > Choirmaster, conducting > > As with all large-scale choral works presented at > First Presbyterian, this > Mass will be considered a service of worship. Those > of you who have joined > us before know that such concerts are usually > overflow, turning people away, > so please arrive in time to assure yourself a good > seat. A fellowship > reception will follow the event. > Please say hello if you attend. > > The First Presbyterian Church is located on Fifth > Avenue, > from Eleventh to Twelfth Streets. > 4,5,6,N,R,and L subways to Union Square > 1,2,3, and 9 subways to Fourteenth Street and > Seventh Avenue > > See you there-- > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear" From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 16:44:24 -0800 (PST)   Please elaborate on this comment. Isn't is necessary to play by ear in order to improvise? Showing my ignorance here but....I don't care I want to learn!   --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Two very different things, two entirely different > skills. >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Practice Organ Options From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:03:35 EST   Dear Cindy:   Residential practice pipe organs, both newly commissioned and rebuilt = older ones, are quite common these days.   One option is to find a small two, three, or four rank instrument and "respecify" it; that is, have your builder releather the instrument, = clean it, do some revoicing, and reduce the number of stops, eliminating = mutations taken off of unison ranks, unnecessary duplications, and putting together = a sensible and Spartan stoplist which avoids the use of the same rank at adjacent pitches on the same manual.   Find a trusted organ builder and ask them if they can help you. Do not go = to a local hobbyist who will assemble parts from their junkheap. You want a musical instrument, not a practice machine. The integrity of a small unit =   pipe organ for practice is really underrated, and people spend way too = much money on little three-rank trackers, with three sets of gedeckts clicking away for the rest of their lives. Creatively designed compact all-pipe organs have been the mainstay of conservatory practice rooms for = generations, and have a valid place in the lives of organists.   Remember that when building small pipe organs, the smaller they are, the = more costly they are: I, as a builder, will have to build you a console, = blower, reservoir, rectifier, building frame, and case for two ranks or for five = -- it is a fixed infrastructure cost. There is also an action chassis and = wind supply fixed cost for any small mechanical action organ.   But if a home pipe organ is your dream, then do what one of my clients = did, which was to set aside ten percent of his paycheck, every payday, toward = his "pipe organ fund." He never missed the money, he somehow stretched the = other 90%, and he sure loved the pipe organ, a 25-year-old four rank instrument, =   completely refurbished and reconfigured to a tight and sensible stoplist.   Good luck with it. Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Creative Name Needed From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:04:56 EST     --part1_d9.11973cf5.27e2c0b8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/15/01 7:56:13 PM !!!First Boot!!!, jovanderlee@vassar.edu writes:     > How about PipeChiffChat? > That's cute, but I'd shorten it to ChiffChat! A cute play on words. Good, Jon.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_d9.11973cf5.27e2c0b8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/15/01 7:56:13 PM !!!First Boot!!!, <BR>jovanderlee@vassar.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">How about = PipeChiffChat? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">That's cute, but I'd shorten it to ChiffChat! = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A cute play on words. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>Good, Jon. <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d9.11973cf5.27e2c0b8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Paris on a Sunday From: "Tim Rand" <tim@minn.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 19:09:10 -0600   Hello, chatters--I will be going to Paris in a week and am trying to = figure out the most efficient method of spending my Sunday (the 25th). My goal = is to take in as many masses, organ recitals, etc., as humanly possible. On = my list is St. Sulpice (where Daniel Roth allegedly invites anyone to organ loft for demos after mass), St. Eustache (where Jean Gillou is said to = have a 5:30 organ recital every Sunday), Notre-Dame, St. Severin, St. Etienne = du Mont, and St. Roch. These are all fairly close on map. I can't find St. Clothilde (Franck's church) on map. Is it also in Paris? Do any of you have leads or suggestions for an efficient Sunday experience? I'm very excited as I've only heard these wonderful instruments on recording and there all so CLOSE to each other by Metro or even foot! Looks like organ pilgrim's dream!!! Thanks. Tim Rand Minneapolis  
(back) Subject: Re: Heaven (well almost) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:17:47 EST     --part1_6a.c270773.27e2c3bb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/16/01 12:39:18 AM !!!First Boot!!!, clavinova98@yahoo.com writes:     > Just wanted to let you all know that I got to play > the church's organ again today! I don't know how I > am going to wait a week until my next lesson. > Cindy, Something that is alot of fun and very helpful is to play unaccompanied melodies on one stop at a time. Start in the middles register and then = work your way up and then back down into the lower register. Play slowly so = that you get to hear the notes sounding and resonating. This is helpful in = two ways: you get to learn what each stop sounds like individually, and you = get a start at improvisation.   After a while you can play counter melodies using contrasting stops on separate manuals. Later, even include a pedal stop. It's great fun.     Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_6a.c270773.27e2c3bb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/16/01 12:39:18 AM !!!First Boot!!!, <BR>clavinova98@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Just wanted to let = you all know that I got to play <BR>the church's organ again today! I don't know how I <BR>am going to wait a week until my next lesson. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Cindy, <BR>Something that is alot of fun and very helpful is to play = unaccompanied <BR>melodies on one stop at a time. &nbsp;&nbsp;Start in the middles = register and then work <BR>your way up and then back down into the lower register. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Play slowly so that <BR>you get to hear the notes sounding and resonating. &nbsp;&nbsp;This is = helpful in two <BR>ways: &nbsp;you get to learn what each stop sounds like individually, = and you get <BR>a start at improvisation. <BR> <BR>After a while you can play counter melodies using contrasting stops on =   <BR>separate manuals. &nbsp;&nbsp;Later, even include a pedal stop. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It's great fun. <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6a.c270773.27e2c3bb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Info. on Organ in MO From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 19:25:31 -0600   I work for Quimby Pipe Organs who have been servicing this organ for = around twenty years. The instrument is a three-manual Aeolian, dating from 1931, and is probably -- in company with the Duke University and Longwood = Gardens instruments -- one of the three finest Aeolians in existence. The church, alas, has not had a great deal of money to spend on restoring it, and as = the leather reaches the end of its life it is a matter of trying to patch it = up and keep it going. The instrument has the later form of Aeolian pitman chests, rather than the earlier "disaster-area" type of balanced side-arm ventil chests, and so would be comparatively easily restorable, given adequate funds. The instrument is a living proof of the fact that when A. H. Marks, the President of the Skinner Organ Company, acquired Aeolian in 1932, he was acquiring a firm at this point every bit as good as Skinner. In the matter of reeds, strings, and mechanism, probably superior to Skinner. The Memorial Presbyterian Aeolian in its approximately 40 ranks contains a surprisingly high proportion of reed stops. These include English and French Horns far superior to anything Skinner ever made, and a stunning 16' Swell Contra Posaune. There are also some unusual features = to this organ -- TWO 16' Open Woods on the Pedal, a 2' Swell to Pedal = coupler, and a General Cancel that includes the Crescendo Pedal. The latter has a cancel pneumatic that gives quite a whack, so you might get a surprise if your foot happens to be on it when you press the GC piston!   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2001 11:22 PM Subject: Info. on Organ in MO     > Hi- > > Does anyone know anything about an organ in Memorial > Presbyterian Church in Clayton, MO, a suburb of St. > Louis? > > I attended that church as a child and would like to > know more about the organ at Memorial Pres.      
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Organ Options From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 17:23:45 -0800   At 08:03 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Residential practice pipe organs, both newly commissioned and rebuilt = older >ones, are quite common these days.<snip>   ....among the very rich and/or hopeless purists, perhaps. As for the new student, just get and old Conn 700-series for $100, find some retired = e-org cobbler to get it working well enough, and bang away at it. Do all your fingering and footing workouts on the old bugger, then take the results every few days to a church where you have a practice arrangement (hard to get sometimes nowadays, with all the paranoid incumbents protecting their turf so much) and work out your registration and other interpretive work Home pipe organ...indeed!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: RE: Practice Organ Options From: "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 02:18:44 -0000   Here in Edinburgh we are very privileged to have an organ open 'to the public' for free for practice. In the St. Stephen's Centre, a former = church (closed about 6 yrs ago) which is now being used as a community centre/concert venue, there is a completely unaltered 1880 Father Willis 3-man 32-stop tracker, that any organist can practice on - the only cost being the telephone call to book it!   This is a most wonderful organ - the 16' Double Diapason on the great is amazingly prompt right down to the bass, and the chorus has a gorgeous warmth and bloom to it. As might be expected from Willis, the flutes and strings are exquisite, while the 121-yr old brassy reeds are hair-parting! As I say, it has had no alterations whatsoever - original console, the = lot.   Unfortunately, there is the cloud that comes with the silver lining. While appreciative of the quality of the organ, the church authorities who still own and 'run' the building, insist on keeping the former sanctuary at = baking heat 24-hrs a day. Harrison & Harrison did restoration work about 20 yrs ago, but due to the heat, the deterioration in the organ's condition has been striking over the last couple of years. Only today I discovered yet another stop that has had to be disconnected. The church are warned, = warned, warned and warned again that they are destroying the organ (I don't know = why they heat the place so much - it's empty half the week!) but to no avail. = It is very sad to see. There are moves afoot to relocate the under-used organ to another church, but being in a huge case and obviously not a candidate for re-actioning, plans are difficult to progress anywhere.   Meanwhile, we do our best to keep the humidifier on emergency setting, = turn off all radiators, and enjoy the wonderful sound that this instrument = sings with.   Any similar experiences?   Regards     Andrew Caskie      
(back) Subject: RE: Practice Organ Options From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:33:34 -0800   At 02:18 AM 3/16/2001 +0000, you wrote: >there is a completely unaltered 1880 Father Willis >3-man 32-stop tracker, that any organist can practice on - the only cost >being the telephone call to book it!<snip>   Now, that's ONE tracker I wouldn't MIND wrestling with!   >insist on keeping the former sanctuary at baking >heat 24-hrs a day.<snip>   Of course, everything's relative. In "Merrie Olde" and environs, it seems= =20 anything about 10=B0C is "baking hot"!   >Meanwhile, we do our best to keep the humidifier on emergency setting, turn >off all radiators<snip>   Steam heat?? That should HELP, if the radiators have relief cocks that=20 bleed off some steam into the room. This is usually seen on single-pipe=20 systems, so YMMV.   Meanwhile, all this does is validate my theorem that trackers are NO more=20 reliable than other actions. Case closed!   dB    
(back) Subject: Fw: toward a theology of organ recitals From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 21:39:08 -0500   Good going, Bob. At least the guys at Indy's Paramount Music Palace (a pizza joynt) kept Widor in proper tempo. I felt sorry for the patrons in = the balcony that sat below the Austin enchamade party horns.   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 7:16 PM Subject: Re: toward a theology of organ recitals     > At 11:43 AM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote: > >They are not only too loud but way too fast!<snip> > > The next time I hear some punky kid bashing Widor's Toccata from the 5th > along at 230 bpm, I think I shall bash the recitalist...with a = Louisville > Slugger! > > Appreciating the value of proper tempi, > > DeserTBoB > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear" From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 21:54:12 -0500   Improvising is diddling around with a well-known tune in different = tempos, rhythms, arrangements, keys, etc.   Playing by ear is sitting down cold to an instrument and doing a recital from the top of ones' head -sans sheet music.   Right...........Wrong?   Rick    
(back) Subject: Fw: Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 21:55:22 -0500   Sorry -I was feeling frisky. <G>   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 7:17 PM Subject: Re: Fw: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen"     > At 06:35 PM 3/15/2001 -0500, you wrote: > >Ya gotta hit a C# with the big toe on yer left foot on the Choir = manual. Or, > >is that the right foot -I fergit.<snip> > > Uh...just WHAT Buxtehude are YOU playing these days??? > > DeserTBoB > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Church Job (was Practice Organ) From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:04:19 EST   In a message dated 3/15/01 12:27:58 PM Central Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << (1) be able to sight-read anything (2) be able to transpose anything you sight-read to any key (3) be able to make beautiful music on a broken-down organ, pipe or electronic (4) have the people skills of Mother Teresa, and the hide of an armadillo (5) be able to live on $5200 a year (if you're LUCKY), prayers, good = wishes, and the leftovers from parish suppers (6) be prepared to play until you die ... retirement isn't an option financially >>   Hmmm...maybe it isn't too late to take that job with the traveling = circus... << All that being said, my best and most succinct piece of advice: MARRY = MONEY (grin). >>   haha, my dad told me to do that a long time ago ;>)   I get your picture, Bud, thanks for the advice. And let me know if you = have any rich, handsome relatives. heehee   Mandy  
(back) Subject: Re: Info. on Organ in MO From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:05:57 EST     --part1_54.11676782.27e2dd15_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/15/2001 8:43:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes:     > The latter has a > cancel pneumatic that gives quite a whack, so you might get a surprise = if > your foot happens to be on it when you press the GC piston! >   I seem to remember reading something about such a device once found at Wanamakers almost thrusting the not enormous Mary Vogt over the balcony railing - almost!   Am I imagining that?   Cheers,   Malcolm   --part1_54.11676782.27e2dd15_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/15/2001 8:43:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The latter has a <BR>cancel pneumatic that gives quite a whack, so you might get a surprise = if <BR>your foot happens to be on it when you press the GC piston! <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I seem to remember reading something about such a device once found at =   <BR>Wanamakers almost thrusting the not enormous Mary Vogt over the = balcony <BR>railing - almost! <BR> <BR>Am I imagining that? <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm</FONT></HTML>   --part1_54.11676782.27e2dd15_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:06:13 -0500   >----- Original Message ----- >From: Bob Scarborough >To: PipeChat >Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 7:17 PM >Subject: Re: Buxtehude Chorale Prelude "Wie Schoen" > >It's incorrect, at least in the Peters Edition by Keller. LH: G-D, RH: B-G.   Thanks, as I suspected.   -Rebekah