PipeChat Digest #1896 - Thursday, March 15, 2001
 
Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear"
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Widor was Re: toward a theology of organ recitals
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Info. on Organ in MO
  by <DrCorgcomp@aol.com>
Re: Practice Organ Options
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Organ Voicing
  by <Orgnplayer@aol.com>
Re: playing by ear
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: playing by ear
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Organ Voicing
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Creative Name Needed
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Philip Moore Workshops & Evensong
  by <Cpmnhartus@aol.com>
Re: toward a theology of organ recitals
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: playing by ear
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Re: Creative Name Needed
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: playing by ear
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Creative Name Needed
  by "Louis Katz" <Louis.Katz@mail.tamucc.edu>
Help!! Archives?
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Re: Philip Moore Workshops & Evensong
  by "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: playing by ear
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: playing by ear
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Re: Widor was Re: toward a theology of organ recitals
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Re: Practice Organ Options
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Re: playing by ear
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Information on organ at Calvary Church?
  by "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com>
Glass armonica scheduled at Episcopal Service, San Diego - March 18
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear" From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:10:20 -0500   Hi Rick,   I'm good with the Improv definition, but the Playing by Ear goes way = beyond memorized recital. It involves the fun factor for the performer along with = his own amazement at being blessed with "the gift"--a gift which I have never had--much to my musical chagrin.   Cheers Mike Gettelman   VEAGUE wrote:   > Improvising is diddling around with a well-known tune in different = tempos, > rhythms, arrangements, keys, etc. > > Playing by ear is sitting down cold to an instrument and doing a recital > from the top of ones' head -sans sheet music. > > Right...........Wrong? > > Rick > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Widor was Re: toward a theology of organ recitals From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:11:45 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 9:39 PM Subject: Fw: toward a theology of organ recitals     > Good going, Bob. At least the guys at Indy's Paramount Music Palace (a > pizza joynt) kept Widor in proper tempo.   I heard a recording of Widor playing his own Toccata and it was ssssslllllloooooowwwwww. Granted, I've probably heard Anthony Newman play = it a few too many times, but I never would have thought from the "buoyancy" = of the music that Widor himself would have played it as such.   Mayhaps he was still being influenced by Schweitzer. ;-)   Anyone else heard this recording? Comments?    
(back) Subject: Re: Info. on Organ in MO From: <DrCorgcomp@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:14:58 EST   John is correct - AEolian was a first-class builder in every respect. Fine =   materials, excellent craftsmanship, all catering, at their prices, to the "Tiffany" class clientele. To compare the AEolian color reeds to = Skinner's, however, is, really, comparing apples to oranges. Thanks be to God, the = Duke Chapel Aeolian was not thrown out - though in the Flentrop installation, = they should not have dispensed with the ancillary echo/antiphonal divisions. C.Callahan  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Organ Options From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:16:56 EST     --part1_89.3c0773c.27e2dfa8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/15/2001 8:16:40 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > The integrity of a small unit > pipe organ for practice is really underrated, and people spend way too = much > money on little three-rank trackers, with three sets of gedeckts = clicking > away for the rest of their lives.   I have no argument with small unit practice organs, except that I'd be = bored silly after a matter of a few months. My goal is to maintain a crisp and = sure technique, and to enjoy the wonderful feel of the opening of the pallet. = When asked to design a small mechanical practice organ for a high school situation, we offered the idea of making the pallets somewhat larger than normal, to just slightly and beneficially increase the feeling of pluck. I =   never, ever, get tired of playing on even three stops on that kind of instrument. Everyone knows that if it clicks, it is not a Mander!!!!!   > > Remember that when building small pipe organs, the smaller they are, the =   > more > costly they are: I, as a builder, will have to build you a console, > blower, > reservoir, rectifier, building frame, and case   .. . . and you won't need that rectifier, so phone the fire company and = put it out.   Malcolm - a bit giddy!       --part1_89.3c0773c.27e2dfa8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/15/2001 8:16:40 PM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The integrity of a = small unit <BR>pipe organ for practice is really underrated, and people spend way too = much <BR>money on little three-rank trackers, with three sets of gedeckts = clicking <BR>away for the rest of their lives. </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I have no argument with small unit practice = organs, except that I'd be bored <BR>silly after a matter of a few months. My goal is to maintain a crisp = and sure <BR>technique, and to enjoy the wonderful feel of the opening of the = pallet. When <BR>asked to design a small mechanical practice organ for a high school <BR>situation, we offered the idea of making the pallets somewhat larger = than <BR>normal, to just slightly and beneficially increase the feeling of = pluck. I <BR>never, ever, get tired of playing on even three stops on that kind of <BR>instrument. Everyone knows that if it clicks, it is not a Mander!!!!! <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px"> <BR>Remember that when building small pipe organs, the smaller they are, = the <BR>more <BR>costly they are: &nbsp;I, as a builder, will have to build you a = console, <BR>blower, <BR>reservoir, rectifier, building frame, and case </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>. . . and you won't need that rectifier, so phone the fire company and = put it <BR>out. <BR> <BR>Malcolm - a bit giddy! <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_89.3c0773c.27e2dfa8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Organ Voicing From: <Orgnplayer@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:22:06 EST   Any suggestions on books/info on the art of organ tonal finishing and voicing? I know this is probably a vast, complicated subject...I'd like = to learn more about the proper balance between voices/ensembles etc. and what = to listen for when making adjustments.   Douglas  
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:42:21 EST   In a message dated 3/15/01 12:54:23 PM Central Standard Time, clavinova98@yahoo.com writes:   << This is a very interesting topic to me. I DON'T play by ear (well, I can a little if i don't look at my hands...if i look at my hands, I can't) >>   Ditto-I can sight read like the devil but when I try to play a melody I = know in service style, my knees turn to water. Over the past few months, my teacher has slowly but steadily increased the amount of harmony and ear training work I do on the organ. I can do the H/ET work on paper, but put = me in front of an instrument...It's getting better, and singing in a choir is = a HUGE help because you learn how the voice parts will usually interact in = the harmony, the fact that altos sing "g's" 98.9% of the time, etc.   Mandy <---bitter alto  
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:48:15 -0500   playing by ear has nothing to do with looking at your hands.   I know some people who can play great (by ear), but can't read a note of music. It simply means you're able to take a song that you know, figure = out the melody on the keyboard, and add the proper chords, almost like you can hear the way it should sound, and then play it. I can play many, many = songs, never having seen the actual sheet music, sometimes better than it was written. Even when I have a song in front of me, I always add more chords and 'do-dads' to make it sound better, like adding the introduction that everyone's used to hearing.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voicing From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:50:37 -0500   Hi Douglas,   William H. Barnes--The Contemporary American Organ--   Excellent place to start. I have not gotten to the chapters on voicing and = tonal issues yet, being currently absorbed in The Austin Universal Windchest = section, but the reading is Americanized and pleasant, and the visual aids are = prolific. I highly recommend this book for the emerging student of pipe organ science.   Cheers Mike Gettelman   Orgnplayer@aol.com wrote:   > Any suggestions on books/info on the art of organ tonal finishing and > voicing? I know this is probably a vast, complicated subject...I'd like = to > learn more about the proper balance between voices/ensembles etc. and = what to > listen for when making adjustments. > > Douglas > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Creative Name Needed From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:18:00 EST   In a message dated 3/15/01 10:15:12 AM Central Standard Time, clavinova98@yahoo.com writes:   << I am starting up an egroup for organists, students, teachers, etc. Does anyone have ideas for a name for our group? Thanks. >>   Organs-r-us  
(back) Subject: Philip Moore Workshops & Evensong From: <Cpmnhartus@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:24:04 EST   15 March 2001   Fellow Listers, your opinion, please.   Last weekend, Philip Moore, Organist and Master of the Music at York = Minster, led two workshops and a service of Choral Evensong at my church, St. = Peter's Episcopal Church in Lewes, Delaware. The Friday evening workshop for organists and choir directors and the all day Saturday choir workshop was followed by a service of Choral Evensong on Sunday. It was an = extraordinary event and Philip Moore was an inspiration for all the musicians.   One of the choir workshop participants, a soprano, commented that the = music for Evensong was "masculine". Somehow, I never thought of most church = music as being gender specific, certainly not the music we sang. Here it is. = Your thoughtful comments are welcome.   Sunday afternoon, 11th March at 4.00 o'clock. Philip Moore, Conductor of the Workshop Choir of 50 voices George Bayley, Organist and Accompanist   Voluntary "Carillon" Leo Sowerby (played by George Bayley) Hymn "How Firm a Foundation" Tune by J. M. Haydn Hymn "O Gracious Light" Tallis' Canon Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in D Minor T. A. Walmisley He That Is Down Needs Fear No Fall Philip Moore Like As the Hart Desireth the Waterbrooks Herbert Howells Organ Selection "Piece Heroique" Cesar Franck (played by Philip Moore) Hymn "The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, Is Ended" Tune St. Clement   All responses, the Apostle's Creed and the Lord's Prayer sung.   Do any of you call this music masculine? Is it gender specific? I think = the singer's comment is sexist rubbish. I'm interested in your thoughts.   George   George W. Bayley                
(back) Subject: Re: toward a theology of organ recitals From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:25:16 EST   Here's a quick version of my idea of organ recitals......   Most of them bore me to death ... period. And I'm an organist... Organ recitals/concerts should contain music which appeals to all (organists = and non musical types alike)... Especially if done in a church! Make sure = that all facets of the organ are explored and that different musical tastes are =   honoured.... God forbid rock or rap.... but you get my drift I hope.... = As long as it is a tasteful, diverse, and well prepared programme how can one = go wrong?   John  
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:34:16 -0800 (PST)     --- Carlo Pietroniro <organist@total.net> wrote: > playing by ear has nothing to do with looking at > your hands.   Yes, I know but for me it does. For some strange reason, if I look at my hands while playing I cannot play by ear. But if i close my eyes or look over the top of the piano...I can play by ear. I must be strange! :-)       But my question was...what is the difference between playing by ear and improvisation? I thought you needed to play by ear in order to improvise. Right?   > music. It simply means you're able to take a song > that you know, figure out > the melody on the keyboard, and add the proper > chords, almost like you can > hear the way it should sound, and then play it. I > can play many, many songs, > never having seen the actual sheet music, sometimes > better than it was > written. Even when I have a song in front of me, I > always add more chords >   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Creative Name Needed From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:34:23 EST   Organblowers?  
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:36:56 -0500   improvising means you're making it up as you go along............   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Creative Name Needed From: "Louis Katz" <Louis.Katz@mail.tamucc.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 22:52:23 -0600   Organ Depot   Organ Nation   Organophilia   Piperzine   Louis    
(back) Subject: Help!! Archives? From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:38:58 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Help! I am getting so much great mail on pipe organs from this list!! Is there anyway to read the archives for this group? Please let me know soon! Thanks,         =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Philip Moore Workshops & Evensong From: "mike" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:45:03 -0500   I'm glad you cross-posted this so I could reply. They won't let me at = PIPORG-L. I guess I would like to see a program of music the below mentioned soprano = selected as "feminine" literature. Could she mean that literature which more = frequently features the soprano voice? Could there be other issues that render = musical scores gender specific? And here I thought I had plenty to think about = already.   Cheers Mike Gettelman   Cpmnhartus@aol.com wrote:   > 15 March 2001 > > Fellow Listers, your opinion, please. > > Last weekend, Philip Moore, Organist and Master of the Music at York = Minster, > led two workshops and a service of Choral Evensong at my church, St. = Peter's > Episcopal Church in Lewes, Delaware. The Friday evening workshop for > organists and choir directors and the all day Saturday choir workshop = was > followed by a service of Choral Evensong on Sunday. It was an = extraordinary > event and Philip Moore was an inspiration for all the musicians. > > One of the choir workshop participants, a soprano, commented that the = music > for Evensong was "masculine". Somehow, I never thought of most church = music > as being gender specific, certainly not the music we sang. Here it is. = Your > thoughtful comments are welcome. > > Sunday afternoon, 11th March at 4.00 o'clock. > Philip Moore, Conductor of the Workshop Choir of 50 voices > George Bayley, Organist and Accompanist > > Voluntary "Carillon" Leo Sowerby > (played by George Bayley) > Hymn "How Firm a Foundation" Tune by J. M. Haydn > Hymn "O Gracious Light" Tallis' Canon > Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in D Minor T. A. Walmisley > He That Is Down Needs Fear No Fall Philip Moore > Like As the Hart Desireth the Waterbrooks Herbert Howells > Organ Selection "Piece Heroique" Cesar Franck > (played by Philip Moore) > Hymn "The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, Is Ended" Tune St. Clement > > All responses, the Apostle's Creed and the Lord's Prayer sung. > > Do any of you call this music masculine? Is it gender specific? I think = the > singer's comment is sexist rubbish. I'm interested in your thoughts. > > George > > George W. Bayley > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:44:41 -0500   Cindy.........I close my eyes whenever I play anything by heart, that's really tricky. I find it easier to play stuff like "tu es petra" by Mulet, with my eyes closed. It's also a way of blocking everything out.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:47:04 -0800 (PST)   Mandy,   I think something that has helped me with my ear training is playing piano for a choir. I did this for about a year and I noticed it helped me with sight reading! Strange...I wasn't expecting that as one of the benefits of playing for the choir. The choir director said it was great (playing for choir) for the ear.   Something about hearing the voices and...lots of practice! --- AMADPoet@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 3/15/01 12:54:23 PM Central > Standard Time, > clavinova98@yahoo.com writes: > > << This is a very interesting topic to me. I DON'T > play > by ear (well, I can a little if i don't look at my > hands...if i look at my hands, I can't)   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Widor was Re: toward a theology of organ recitals From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:56:29 -0500   Rebekah,   Widor was 88 years of age when he recorded his Toccata at Saint-Sulpice. = It is interesting to hear what registrations he used at Saint-Sulpice and = what the Cavaille-Coll sounded like in 1932.   BBD   Bonnie Beth Derby, B.Mus., M.Mus. Producer & Host ``Orgelwerke'' & ``Choral Traditions'' WCNY-FM, 91.3; Syracuse; WUNY-FM, 89.5, Utica; WJNY-FM, 90.9, Watertown Organist & Director of Music, St. James Roman Catholic Church, Syracuse [1988 Odell/Kerner & Merchant 33-rank tracker organ] orge@dreamscape.com ----- Original Message ----- From: Rebekah Ingram <rringram@syr.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 10:11 PM Subject: Widor was Re: toward a theology of organ recitals     > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 9:39 PM > Subject: Fw: toward a theology of organ recitals > > > > Good going, Bob. At least the guys at Indy's Paramount Music Palace = (a > > pizza joynt) kept Widor in proper tempo. > > I heard a recording of Widor playing his own Toccata and it was > ssssslllllloooooowwwwww. Granted, I've probably heard Anthony Newman = play it > a few too many times, but I never would have thought from the "buoyancy" of > the music that Widor himself would have played it as such. > > Mayhaps he was still being influenced by Schweitzer. ;-) > > Anyone else heard this recording? Comments? > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Organ Options From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 20:52:20 -0800 (PST)   Malcom=3D   You BUILD pipe organs?? Oh how exciting! How did you get started in this field?       =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:54:49 EST     --part1_b7.c43715a.27e2f699_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Accompanying a choir is one of the best training opportunities. Not only does one learn to sightread (because one must), but you also begin to hear =   things from a director's point of view. And, it's much like playing = chamber music for the instrumentalist (I'm referring to the ensemble aspect).   It's also a great way to build repertoire.   Neil B   --part1_b7.c43715a.27e2f699_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Accompanying a choir is = one of the best training opportunities. &nbsp;Not only <BR>does one learn to sightread (because one must), but you also begin to = hear <BR>things from a director's point of view. &nbsp;And, it's much like = playing chamber <BR>music for the instrumentalist (I'm referring to the ensemble aspect). <BR> <BR>It's also a great way to build repertoire. <BR> <BR>Neil B</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b7.c43715a.27e2f699_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Information on organ at Calvary Church? From: "Cindy Adams" <clavinova98@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 21:00:23 -0800 (PST)   Hi-   Maybe the person who told me about the organ at Memorial Pres. can tell me what kind of organ there is in Calvary Church in Charlotte, NC? There is supposed to be a recital there soon with 4 organs being played. No other details on the recital.   this is the church where they had Dale Earnheart's memorial service. Did anyone see it? the pianist was great! but i dont recall any organ music. Pretty sure they have an organ though. Have not been there in a long time... Charlotte is my hometown. I miss it...such a pretty place in the spring!! Sorry to ramble...   Not to brag but my dad was pastor of Calvary Church in the olden days before it got so huge!! He laid a good foundation!!:-) --- ManderUSA@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 3/15/2001 8:43:55 PM Eastern > Standard Time, > jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: > > > > The latter has a > > cancel pneumatic that gives quite a whack, so you > might get a surprise if > > your foot happens to be on it when you press the > GC piston! > > > > I seem to remember reading something about such a > device once found at > Wanamakers almost thrusting the not enormous Mary > Vogt over the balcony > railing - almost! > > Am I imagining that? > > Cheers, > > Malcolm >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Cindy   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Glass armonica scheduled at Episcopal Service, San Diego - March 18 From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 23:59:57 EST   Sorry about the late notice, but I thought some of you might like to know there is an all-Mozart Sunday morning service which will include the = ethereal sounds of the glass armonica this weekend. The morning service generally = is of about 1 1/4 hours in length, and all the music throughout the service, selected by organist/choir director Bob Thompson, will be by W. A. Mozart. = Featured as the prelude and recessional will be the works he composed in = 1791 especially for the armonica, the unusual glass musical instrument invented = by Benjamin Franklin.   WHERE: All Soul's Episcopal Church 1475 Catalina Boulevard (at Chatsworth) San Diego, CA 92107 WHEN: Sunday, March 18, 2001, 10:00 a.m. prelude WHAT: All Mozart service including glass armonica with string quartet, = organ and choir. MORE INFORMATION: www all-souls.com   Adagio & Rondo in C, K. 617   It was not until 1791, during the last year of his life, that Mozart was inspired to compose for this enchanting instrument. He was commissioned = by blind armonica virtuoso Marianna Kirchgassner to create what was to become =   his last chamber ensemble composition. Alfred Einstein wrote of the piece being, "one of his heavenly works, an instrumental counterpart to the Ave Verum with an unearthly beauty in the Introduction."   Adagio in C Major, K. 617a (K. 356)   This brief Adagio is the "other" piece Mozart wrote for glass armonicist Marianna Kirchgassner. The originally assigned Koechel number would = suggest that this music was written in Salzburg about 1779, but it was actually composed in Vienna in the Spring of 1791; the revised Kochel catalog = assigns it the number K. 617a. The ethereal sound of unaccompanied armonica is = given a simple melody and its accompaniment that alternates with contrasting episodes in a rondo form. Mozart writes the parts for both hands in = treble clef, keeping the armonica in its most telling range and exploiting its = most characteristic sound. The harmonies are delicately colored by = chromaticism and inflected with brief ornaments that provide the ineffable grace of the =   Mozartean style.   ------   Dennis James (Armonica) is a graduate of Indiana University (USA) with = both bachelors and masters degrees in organ performance. He has maintained an active international career in music since 1967 and developed his = compelling interest in glass music upon hearing recordings by the late German glass = harp virtuoso Bruno Hoffmann. James organized the First International Glass = Music Festival in 1983, bringing performers and enthusiasts of glass music from around the world together for the first time. He asserts that he began performing with glass in an attempt to confirm the 18th century belief = that playing the unusual musical instruments would cause a person to become insane. Not yet showing evident signs of the mysterious illness, Dennis James travels throughout the world playing his modern recreation of = Benjamin Franklin's celebrated invention, the glass armonica.