PipeChat Digest #1907 - Friday, March 16, 2001
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #1904 - 03/16/01
  by <StatRussell@aol.com>
Re: Glass Armonica
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: Organ Voicing
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Practice Organ Options
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear"
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: playing by ear
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1904 - 03/16/01 From: <StatRussell@aol.com> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 13:11:07 EST     --part1_38.1365fcf3.27e3b13b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Glad to see people with experience on the Calvary organ ringing in with commentary. It's just terrible that these magnificent organs are allowed = to rot for the sake of "contemporary praise music". Way to go Scott with playing /singing Stanford (a real favorite of mine). I remember when I = was younger, hearing the opening of "Praise to the Lord" on the organ and = wanting to sing so bad when Mass started. That's one of the reasons I fell in = love with the organ to begin with. Now we have all this "Contemporary = Christian" music which brings out a great feeling of ambivalance.   The Jesse Helms reference was not all that misplaced. I've lived in North =   Carolina for a time when he was in his heyday down there and a lot of = those people think like he does. Do not underestimate that thought by any = stroke of the imagination. The reason he gets re-elected down there even though he's a national joke (I prefer detrement) is because he is more representative of his constituency than you could ever believe. And a = number of those are of the type that attend Calvary Church. I'm very sorry I had = to say that but I do have the experience of life there. I know there's = change going on there but it may be to late for some things to turn around in = time. Hopefully, somebody will come to their senses there.   Best to all,   Dennis   --part1_38.1365fcf3.27e3b13b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Glad to see people with = experience on the Calvary organ ringing in with <BR>commentary. &nbsp;It's just terrible that these magnificent organs are = allowed to <BR>rot for the sake of "contemporary praise music". &nbsp;Way to go Scott = with <BR>playing /singing Stanford (a real favorite of mine). &nbsp;I remember = when I was <BR>younger, hearing the opening of "Praise to the Lord" on the organ and = wanting <BR>to sing so bad when Mass started. &nbsp;That's one of the reasons I = fell in love <BR>with the organ to begin with. &nbsp;Now we have all this "Contemporary = Christian" <BR>music which brings out a great feeling of ambivalance. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>The Jesse Helms reference was not all that misplaced. &nbsp;I've lived = in North <BR>Carolina for a time when he was in his heyday down there and a lot of = those <BR>people think like he does. &nbsp;Do not underestimate that thought by = any stroke <BR>of the imagination. &nbsp;The reason he gets re-elected down there = even though <BR>he's a national joke (I prefer detrement) is because he is more <BR>representative of his constituency than you could ever believe. = &nbsp;And a number <BR>of those are of the type that attend Calvary Church. &nbsp;I'm very = sorry I had to <BR>say that but I do have the experience of life there. &nbsp;&nbsp;I = know there's change <BR>going on there but it may be to late for some things to turn around in = time. &nbsp; <BR>Hopefully, somebody will come to their senses there. <BR> <BR>Best to all, <BR> <BR>Dennis &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_38.1365fcf3.27e3b13b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Glass Armonica From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 13:19:45 EST   Ron Severin provides some speculations that by my 20 year experience in researching and playing glass armonicas do not yet bear the scrutiny of = fact and historical record:   > These were popular of course during Mozart's time, but those instruments > made then were of leaded glass.   The armonica was invented in 1761. My files indicate lead was introduced = to the glass-making process in circa 1788 by George Ravenscroft and only thereafter used in building armonicas. So, Mozart's time that included leaded glass instruments lasted about 3 years.   >This was the purist glass available.   Lead is an addition that actually lessens the "purity" of the melted sand. = I'm told it was added primarily to lower the melt temperature making the working of the glass easier and last longer. The optical qualities that = also resulted were considered a positive attribute as well. In glass music use =   the addition of lead enabled a different tone- thought to be brighter and, =   most importantly, longer ringing. It was Marianna Kirchgessner, a distant =   cousin of W. A. Mozart and reigning virtuosa of the late-armonica period, = who reputedly played the first "leaded" armonica. Research has revealed that = she was quite keen to keep the improvement a secret, persuading her builder = not to make the new bowls for others. The secret, however, was rapidly discovered and such other players as Franz Anton Mesmer became quite = famous for the similarly improved tonal qualities of their instruments.   > However, people who played them began to notice headaches, nausia > weight loss, weakness, and some died. Problem, you guessed it, > LEAD POISEN.   This hasn't been proven. There was, however, a presumptive association = made between playing armonicas and illness in the time. My favorite similar = logic application was used to the celebrated accounts of the death of one C. W. Frick: after an armonica performance Herr Frick died and his death was publicly attributed to his having played the armonica. One report of the time shows he was "seized by a severe cramping of the chest" before = expiring. These days this symptom may also readily be applied to the onset of a = heart attack. Carrying one may consider that there are many heart attack = victims who have never played an armonica in their lives. So where does that = leave us?   Most glass scientists to whom I have spoken have great problems with the presumption that lead can both leech out of glass under the condition of being stroked with water-moistened fingers, and also that such lead, if indeed so acquired, can then enter the body in an amount to cause such deleterious effects as in the descriptions above. More suspect, however, = is the leaded paint often used to mark the insides of the rims to enable note =   identification by players. Contemporary thought is centered on potential transference of lead from this source as related to armonicas.   >When this was discovered the popularity waned.   This is an assumptive leap not bearing historical scrutiny - in fact, the illness notoriety actually increased popularity as related to attendance = at concerts and coverage in the media, much in the same manner as car crashes = in relation to automobile racing today.   >It is > possible now to make these without leaded glass.   It was also possible then, and quite regularly done via the substitution = to so-called "white crystal" wherein the lead is replaced by an increase of potash in the mix before melting. This alteration was found to retain the =   lower melt temperature, provide nearly the same optical properties, and, = most importantly here, retain the increase of specific density properties of = the resulting glass enabling the same acoustical results as the leaded glass bowls.   > They are beautiful > to listen to and quite haunting.   Indeed. Leopold Roellig, one of the instrument's admirers and leading performers, summed up the thoughts of many when he wrote in 1787: "The sensation the armonica produced after its first appearance and the unanimous applause of all who heard it make the instrument . . . the most satisfying =   and the most beautiful mankind has ever known."     Dennis James   Glass Music / Musica Curiosa 3707 5th Avenue, #412 San Diego, CA 92103 619-234-1396 / muscur@aol.com        
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voicing From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 13:26:41 EST     --part1_96.11777a2d.27e3b4e1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Mike and all....   The person making the decisions in most major American pipe organ shops is =   the "Tonal Director." This man creates the stop list, determines the wind =   pressures to be used, selects the scaling of the pipes and the materials = that the pipes will be constructed from, writes the directions for the voicers = in the voicing rooms, and then supervises the onsite tonal finishing.   He may preside over the entire finishing process, or he may dispatch on of =   the senior voicers from the shop to do the work with the TD visiting the = site from time to time to be sure that his wishes are being carried out.   I hope that this helps you understand how the process takes place.   Bill Hesterman   --part1_96.11777a2d.27e3b4e1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3>Hi Mike and all.... <BR> <BR>The person making the decisions in most major American pipe organ = shops is <BR>the "Tonal Director." &nbsp;This man creates the stop list, determines = the wind <BR>pressures to be used, selects the scaling of the pipes and the = materials that <BR>the pipes will be constructed from, writes the directions for the = voicers in <BR>the voicing rooms, and then supervises the onsite tonal finishing. <BR> <BR>He may preside over the entire finishing process, or he may dispatch = on of <BR>the senior voicers from the shop to do the work with the TD visiting = the site <BR>from time to time to be sure that his wishes are being carried out. <BR> <BR>I hope that this helps you understand how the process takes place. <BR> <BR>Bill Hesterman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_96.11777a2d.27e3b4e1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Organ Options From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 10:36:35 -0800     --------------159FD18F7AC9BD3DA2AFE24B Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Patty - contact Bill Visscher at   opus@got.net (e-mail)   http://www.concentric.net/~leboom/visscher/ (web page)   He's an organ-builder in your neck of the woods ... he can prolly help you find something suitable at Organ Clearing House,   http://www.organclearinghouse.com/   or locally.   Cheers,   Bud   "Patricia A. Blissenbach" wrote:   > I have been watching this thread with keen interest since I was given > an old Hammond to practice on at home. It has no operator's manual > and I don't know exactly how to make use of the slide bar settings. > I'm tolerating its sound less and less as time goes by. It's nice, as > some here have stated, to be able to work out pedaling at home, but I > would like a more musical sounding instrument. I am in the market for > a small pipe organ, but I don't know how to best find what I'm looking > for. I live in northern California. We have remodeled our living > room so it is now 30 by 33' and 15' ceiling. I already have two grand > pianos in there and would like to compromise with an organ that has > some pipes and the rest digital; full pedal board, of course. Some > woman prefer diamonds.BR,Patty B-bach > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Cremona502@cs.com > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Sent: Friday, March 16, 2001 7:36 AM > Subject: Re: Practice Organ Options > In a message dated 3/15/2001 8:16:40 PM Eastern Standard > Time, > TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > > > > > The integrity of a small unit pipe organ for practice is > > really underrated, > > and people spend way too much money on little three-rank > > trackers, with > > three sets of gedeckts clicking away for the rest of their > > lives. > > The sets of gedeckts is a poorly designed practice organ. > IMHO, it's not an > organ until it has an 8' Principal (at least from tenor > g). I would much > rather have a Diapason, Flute and String to practice on than > the same three > ranks unified to 25 stops, thus "necessitating" pistons > etc. A three-stop > practice instrument has no need for a "console", but only > keyboard(s), pedal > board, and drawknobs extending from the case. > > > > Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, > Bohawow!" > Visit Howling Acres at > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ >   --------------159FD18F7AC9BD3DA2AFE24B Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> Patty - contact Bill Visscher at <p>opus@got.net (e-mail) <p><A = HREF=3D"http://www.concentric.net/~leboom/visscher/">http://www.concentric.= net/~leboom/visscher/</A> (web page) <p>He's an organ-builder in your neck of the woods ... he can prolly help you find something suitable at Organ Clearing House, <p><A = HREF=3D"http://www.organclearinghouse.com/">http://www.organclearinghouse.c= om/</A> <p>or locally. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>"Patricia A. Blissenbach" wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><style></style> <font face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>I have been watching this thread with keen interest since I was given an old Hammond to practice on at home.&nbsp; It has no operator's manual and I don't know exactly how to make use of the slide bar settings.&nbsp; I'm tolerating its sound less and less as time goes by.&nbsp; It's nice, as some here have stated, to be able to work out pedaling at home,&nbsp; but I would like a more musical sounding instrument.</font></font>&nbsp;<font = face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>I am in the market for a small pipe organ, but I don't know how to best find what I'm looking for.&nbsp; I live in northern California.&nbsp; We have remodeled our living room so it is now 30 by 33' and 15' ceiling.&nbsp; I already have two grand pianos in there and would like to compromise with an organ that has some pipes and the rest digital; full pedal board, of course.&nbsp; Some woman prefer diamonds.</font></font><font = face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>BR,</font></font><font face=3D"Arial"><font = size=3D-1>Patty B-bach</font></font> <blockquote style=3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <div style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----</div>   <div style=3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: = black"><b>From:</b> <a href=3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com" = title=3D"Cremona502@cs.com">Cremona502@cs.com</a></div>   <div style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><b>To:</b> <a = href=3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org" = title=3D"pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</a></div>   <div style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><b>Sent:</b> Friday, March 16, 2001 7:36 AM</div>   <div style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><b>Subject:</b> Re: Practice Organ = Options</div> &nbsp;<font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In a message dated = 3/15/2001 8:16:40 PM Eastern Standard Time,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1><a = href=3D"mailto:TubaMagna@aol.com">TubaMagna@aol.com</a> writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px" TYPE=3D"CITE"><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>The integrity of a small unit pipe organ for practice is really = underrated,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>and people spend way = too much money on little three-rank trackers, with</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>three sets of gedeckts = clicking away for the rest of their lives.</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>The sets = of gedeckts is a poorly designed practice organ.&nbsp; IMHO, it's not = an</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>organ = until it has an 8' Principal (at least from tenor g).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I would much</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>rather = have a Diapason, Flute and String to practice on than the same = three</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>ranks = unified to 25 stops, thus "necessitating" pistons etc.&nbsp;&nbsp; A = three-stop</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>practice = instrument has no need for a "console", but only keyboard(s), = pedal</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>board, = and drawknobs extending from the case.</font></font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>Bruce&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ~&nbsp; Cremona502@cs.com</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>with the = Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!"</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Visit = Howling Acres at&nbsp;&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/">http://members.tripod.com/Bru= con502/</A></font></font></font></blockquote> </blockquote>   </body> </html>   --------------159FD18F7AC9BD3DA2AFE24B--    
(back) Subject: Re: Improvisation vs. playing "by ear" From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 13:36:31 -0500   actually.........with the right amount of ear-training, and the PROPER ear-training, one can most certainly acquire perfect pitch....but one = cannot be 'taught' perfect pitch    
(back) Subject: Re: playing by ear From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 12:42:31 EST     --part1_9a.117a6dd6.27e3aa87_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/16/2001 11:22:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes:     > This other system you mention sounds like a shorthand > version or a way to avoid learning to read real music. (Just my = opinion).   I believe that is quite correct. It is thought of as a short cut for the amateur.   Cheers,   Malcolm   --part1_9a.117a6dd6.27e3aa87_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 3/16/2001 11:22:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">This other system = you mention sounds like a shorthand <BR>version or a way to avoid learning to read real music. &nbsp;(Just my = opinion). </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I believe that is quite correct. It is thought of as a short cut for = the <BR>amateur. <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9a.117a6dd6.27e3aa87_boundary--