PipeChat Digest #1915 - Saturday, March 17, 2001
 
Re: Expression Pedal Order
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: Russian Organ music
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Small organs: One chamber enclosure?  Two chamber enclosure?
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: armonica
  by "Patricia A. Blissenbach" <pab@inreach.com>
Re: Organ Voicing
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Expression Pedal Order
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Russian Organ music - article in TAO
  by "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure?  Two chamber enclosure?
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Organ Gala--Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra
  by <CdyVanpool@aol.com>
Expressive Divisions (Here we go...)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure?  Two chamber enclosure?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Expression Pedal Order From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 11:32:18 -0000   Gentlemen, If you wish to continue this discussion re the enclosing of Great Organ divisions, please would you do so very quietly? There is a tendency for aspects of American influence to cross the ditch, and one thinks immediately of the baseball cap, drive-through McDonalds, WalMart, 'Friends', so on and so forth. We would not therefore, wish this topic also to be overheard here.   Whilst one imagines that the likes of Mander, Harrison & Harrison, Walker, the (re-born) Willis, and so on will be immune to this wholly nasty idea, there are some modern organ builders around the UK who may not possess the same integrity.   So be warned! You send us enclosed Greats........... we send you Norwich e/orgs. (trust me, as threats go, this is well into the *serious* end of the spectrum).   And we'll take back Copeman Hart........ so there!!   Chris Baker (There's a lump on the side of my face. I think my tongue's got jammed in there. Oww!)    
(back) Subject: Re: Russian Organ music From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:02:48 +0800 (CST)       On Sat, 17 Mar 2001 AMADPoet@aol.com wrote:   > Forgive my extreme ignorance... > > Is there any Russian organ music out there? I think the closest I've = come is > Scriabin piano music transcribed for the organ. Also what are some of = the > better organs in Russia (if any??) and who built them?   Toccata, by Georgi Mushel --- in a small collection of modern organ music put out by Oxford University Press, I believe.... I don't have it readily at hand... I'm sure someone else can assist you with the exact citation of the title of the collection...   By the way, I heard this piece first on the Mormon Tabernacle Organ...   I don't know if Stephen Roberts is on this list... if so, I believe he can assist you... He is on at least one of the organ lists.... look in the index of the past few years of the AGO Magazine and The Diapason ... you should find some articles re: organ music...     Best wishes,       Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member...     > > For some reason I've never associated the organ with Russia, though that =   > could be because I don't know anything at all about the Greek Orthodox > Church, and usually associate organs in general with church music. > > Any thoughts? > > Thanks, > Mandy >  
(back) Subject: Small organs: One chamber enclosure? Two chamber enclosure? From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:18:11 +0800 (CST)       On Sat, 17 Mar 2001, Chris Baker wrote:   > Gentlemen, > If you wish to continue this discussion re the enclosing of Great > Organ divisions, please would you do so very quietly?   As I am keying in this e-mail, in the background on my computer I'm listening to a MP3 file of Pietro Yon's Gesu Bambino... played very quietly but yet very sweetly...     A question I'd like others to comment on.   With a small organ, how many ranks should one have before it is divided into two divisions (division no. l =3D enclosed and division no. 2 = either completely unenclosed or partially unenclosed)?   I have played on small organs up to about 10 ranks which were all placed in one chamber... Surely some individuals on the list can come up with some specs of small organs that could be divided into two divisions...   I have played on an organ with an enclosed Swell and a completely unenclosed Great... I often wished that, for flexibility, all the ranks except for the Diapason 8 and Octave 4 had been enclosed...   Partially enclosed Great Organs do not seem to be in vogue any more... Any reason why? What are the disadvantages to partially enclosed Great Organs? To me the advantage of a partially enclosed Great Organ is more flexibility...   I'm looking forward to the varied opinions on the questions I have raised above....   Best wishes to all..     Morton Belcher fellow Pipechat list member...       > > Chris Baker > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics  
(back) Subject: Re: armonica From: "Patricia A. Blissenbach" <pab@inreach.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 05:54:09 -0800   I needed to do some research on the origin of the glass (h)armonica a = couple years ago and found a great site at: http://finkenbeiner.bcn.net/ It really put things in perspective for me to realize that Ben Franklin and Mozart were alive at the same time. IIRC, Beethoven also wrote something for it, also. Patty B-bach     ----- Original Message ----- From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 16, 2001 5:04 PM Subject: Re: armonica     > > Hi Dennis: > > Hi Ron > > > > I didn't just make that up! Discovery Channel did a documentry > > And we are to believe everything we read in the newspaper and see on TV? ;-) > > > Seriously, though, I have seen, and thoroughly examined the written > transcription of, the Alan Alda-hosted "documentary." This general-interest > program rapidly became a misinformation-filled promotional "puff" piece for > one modern day manufacturer of his new quartz-glass invention unfortunately > represented in other such sales promotions to be a replica (but at the same > time an improvement covered by various patents) of the Franklin = armonica. > > > And I've seen it in print about Harmonicas(Glass). > > Let's get nomenclature straight first: > > GLASS HARMONICA: a misspelling (apparently of German origin) of = armonica, the   >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voicing From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 09:00:50 EST   In a message dated 3/16/01 1:48:24 AM EST, mike3247@earthlink.net writes:   > teaching a student who doesn't know all the basics of organ building, so = I > return to my copy of--The Contemporary American Organ--and study, = study, > study---for I too want to be a voicer one day. > > Mike Gettelman If you really want ot be a voicer, the BEST way is (as others have said) = to learn from someone who has achieved the skills (and artistic ear) needed = to do the job. There are companies that occasionally look for potential apprentices. One danger (IMHO) is that a lot of people go into = organbuilding with preconceived notions of just exact;ly what constitutes the 'ideal' = style of organbuilding. be OPEN to learn and willing to moderate your already developed ideas and you have a much greater chance of succeeding. Voicing = is hard work, dealing with minute details constantly and subject to constant criticism from one's peers (as are almost all aspects of organ building = and organ playing).   Best wishes, and persue your dream!!   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Expression Pedal Order From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 09:20:27 EST   In a message dated 3/16/01 6:47:48 PM EST, organist@total.net writes:   >=20 > I've played mostly Casavants, Ruffattis, Beckeraths, Guilbeault-Th=E9rien= s, > Fran=E7ois Carons.... > =20 > Carlo What a deprived existence not to have been able to play a fully-enclosed=20 romatic-era organ. there is no other sound like full organ boxed up like a=20 hurricane fighting to get out of the box...then to kick open (via the=20 all-swells-to-swell) the shades to release the beast. WHAT A RUSH!!!   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Russian Organ music - article in TAO From: "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 09:11:33 -0500   Dear Mandy, Morton, and Pipechatters,   > What are some of the > better organs in Russia and who built them?   Thanks to Morton Belcher for mentioning Stephen Roberts, a marvelous player and teacher in CT, who is a frequent contributor to the PIPORG-L(ist.) Within the past two years, I think, Steve wrote a fine article for TAO (The American Organist), the monthly magazine of the AGO (American Guild of Organists.) about his recital tour of Russia. You are a member of the AGO, Mandy, I trust! If not, the dues reduction is good until the end of this month!   Pat Maimone who has a wedding to play today in the still wintry Hudson Valley of New York, although we did see some bright sun yesterday ...   Post Chapel, West Point, NY III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller/Gress-Miles District Convener, Upstate New York AGO chapters ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure? Two chamber enclosure? From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 09:32:49 EST   In a message dated 3/17/01 8:05:15 AM EST, flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw = writes:   > Partially enclosed Great Organs do not seem to be in vogue any more... > Any reason why? Yes, because those educators and organ builders and organists who have = bought into the notion the the great MUST be enenclosed have influenced the organbuilding practice in the US. HOWEVER there ore those of us who = believe that a two-division pipeorgan under seperate controls (i.e. an expressive Great and an expressive Swell in seperate chambers) offers MUCH more flexibility in use. If I could build my own ideal instrument, it would ALL = be under expression. The idea that you can't have bright, clear registrations =   from an enclosed division is so much fluff. if you don't wat an expressive =   division, FINE, just leave the expression pedal(s) open. but DON'T limit someone else's flexibility just 'cause you don't want it there. (rant concluded)   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Gala--Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra From: <CdyVanpool@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 10:11:07 EST     Thank you, Bruce, for a wonderful review! I almost "felt" I was there. I felt like that when they had the opening for the Fisk at the Myerson. I have NEVER heard an organ like that....(and still haven't since!)   I agree, we have good announcements of concerts, but it would also be nice = to have a review of them as well.   Van Vanpool, organist FUMC Bowie, Texas  
(back) Subject: Expressive Divisions (Here we go...) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 10:26:30 EST     --part1_18.a4691e9.27e4dc26_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/17/01 6:27:53 AM Eastern Standard Time, chorale@clara.co.uk writes:   > If you wish to continue this discussion re the enclosing of Great > Organ divisions, please would you do so very quietly?   Absolutely NOT. I wish to speak of the instrument I play daily as an example, but let me remind you, sir, and everyone else that the Kilgen = here at the Shrine is an instrument designed and voiced by Henry Vincent Willis =   and is extremely English in its tone and effect.     > here is a tendency for aspects of American influence to cross the > ditch, and one thinks immediately of the baseball cap, drive-through > McDonalds, WalMart, 'Friends', so on and so forth. We would not > therefore, wish this topic also to be overheard here.   Well that's just too bad. When I took up the post of principal organist = and director of music here three years ago the expression shades on the main Great had been removed for 30 years and the pneumatics in the Antiphonal Great were blown to the point that they would not operate. One of the = very first things we did was to reinstall the Main great shades and, when the = time came when the Antiphonal divisions were playing again, put new expression motors on those divisions. Lastly, please remember that those enclosed = Great divisions are voiced so that, though under expression, they do not suffer = or become "muffled" in the least. If one sat down and played the organ and = did not know there were shades in both Great divisions, they would not notice = a dull or quiet tone emitting from those chambers. I believe, as do many others, that a completely expressive instrument is wonderful and certainly =   increases the flexibility.     > Whilst one imagines that the likes of Mander, Harrison & Harrison, > Walker, the (re-born) Willis, and so on will be immune to this wholly > nasty idea, there are some modern organ builders around the UK who may > not possess the same integrity.   INTEGRITY??? Please! This instrument was designed for A) Divine Liturgy = and B) playing of the repertoire. There is NOTHING that can't be played on = this organ and believe me when I tell you that it truly is an English Cathedral =   Organ in every sense of the word. If Mander, Walker, Willis and Harrison = and Harrison do not or have not experimented with a totally or partially = enclosed Great, then I would think that they have not fully explored the full tonal =   and symphonic possibilities and options that a grand organ can posses.     > So be warned! You send us enclosed Greats........... we send you > Norwich e/orgs. (trust me, as threats go, this is well into the > *serious* end of the spectrum). > >   Well, we have Allens and Rodgers and Galantis and other digital organs = here, but when there is not space nor funding for pipes, they are wonderful alternatives.   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy The National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, Opus 5180, 1933. "Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens: fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar."     --part1_18.a4691e9.27e4dc26_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/17/01 6:27:53 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>chorale@clara.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">If you wish to = continue this discussion re the enclosing of Great <BR>Organ divisions, please would you do so very quietly?</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Absolutely NOT. &nbsp;I wish to speak of the instrument I play daily = as an <BR>example, but let me remind you, sir, and everyone else that the Kilgen = here <BR>at the Shrine is an instrument designed and voiced by Henry Vincent Willis <BR>and is extremely English in its tone and effect. &nbsp; <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">T<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">here is a tendency for aspects of American influence to cross the <BR>ditch, and one thinks immediately of the baseball cap, drive-through <BR>McDonalds, WalMart, 'Friends', so on and so forth. We would not <BR>therefore, wish this topic also to be overheard here.</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Well that's just too bad. &nbsp;When I took up the post of principal = organist and <BR>director of music here three years ago the expression shades on the = main <BR>Great had been removed for 30 years and the pneumatics in the = Antiphonal <BR>Great were blown to the point that they would not operate. &nbsp;One = of the very <BR>first things we did was to reinstall the Main great shades and, when = the time <BR>came when the Antiphonal divisions were playing again, put new = expression <BR>motors on those divisions. &nbsp;Lastly, please remember that those = enclosed Great <BR>divisions are voiced so that, though under expression, they do not = suffer or <BR>become "muffled" in the least. &nbsp;If one sat down and played the = organ and did <BR>not know there were shades in both Great divisions, they would not = notice a <BR>dull or quiet tone emitting from those chambers. &nbsp;I believe, as = do many <BR>others, that a completely expressive instrument is wonderful and = certainly <BR>increases the flexibility. <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">Whilst one imagines that the likes of Mander, Harrison &amp; = Harrison, <BR>Walker, the (re-born) Willis, and so on will be immune to this wholly <BR>nasty idea, there are some modern organ builders around the UK who may <BR>not possess the same integrity.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>INTEGRITY??? Please! &nbsp;This instrument was designed for A) Divine = Liturgy and <BR>B) playing of the repertoire. &nbsp;There is NOTHING that can't be = played on this <BR>organ and believe me when I tell you that it truly is an English = Cathedral <BR>Organ in every sense of the word. &nbsp;If Mander, Walker, Willis and = Harrison and <BR>Harrison do not or have not experimented with a totally or partially = enclosed <BR>Great, then I would think that they have not fully explored the full = tonal <BR>and symphonic possibilities and options that a grand organ can posses. <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">So be warned! You send us enclosed Greats........... we send you <BR>Norwich e/orgs. (trust me, as threats go, this is well into the <BR>*serious* end of the spectrum). <BR> <BR>And we'll take back Copeman Hart........ so there!!</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Well, we have Allens and Rodgers and Galantis and other digital organs = here, <BR>but when there is not space nor funding for pipes, they are wonderful <BR>alternatives. &nbsp; <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = Liturgy <BR>The National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, Opus 5180, 1933. <BR><I>"Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens: <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar."</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_18.a4691e9.27e4dc26_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure? Two chamber enclosure? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 11:08:37 EST     --part1_2f.1269da3c.27e4e605_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In response to Morton.... truth be told, if you have two ranks you can = have two enclosed divisions and the organ will become more versatile. My preference is to always have rank number one (!), the Open Diapason, in = the facade, or as close to it as it can get. There is no more beautiful sound = to me than Diapason-in-your-face!!   With a small organ, since divisional separation is rather a moot point, a theatre organ approach might work well, placing the string(s) in one box = and the flute(s) in another. Thus with the unenclosed Diapason to which I = would also add a whisper Dulciana (why put it in the box when you can barely = hear it anyway??), your versatility is increased.   If space is a problem, then consider a swell within a swell, possibly = placing the string section in the back box, since it would more than likely be = the accompanimental stop to the flute, which would in turn accompany the Diapason. The Dulciana, in all its genteelity (!), could accompany = either the flute and/or string, giving the melodic line the opportunity of expression.   For larger two-manual organs, I think an enclosed Great is very helpful in =   playing literature, especially that intended for a three manual = instrument. The 3/16 Wicks at University UMC - Gainesville, was extremely versatile since the two-manual design had been expanded to three manuals simply by adding a keyboard! The Great is simply the Principal chorus (8 4 2-2/3 = 2) and the Choir is the rest of the Great enclosed (Viola, Harmonic Flute, Gemshorn, Dolcan, Celeste). Harmonic Flute and Gemshorn are duplexed to = the Great at 8 and 4. While I was there, the Choir shutters were removed to =   facilitate stable tuning and access into the chamber. The Choir stops = are so mild, and since there is no reed in it, the shutters were not missed = much, and the added clarity was appreciated.   If it can be done without too much expense, I would prefer to have the = Great split in this way, for instance: Great: Principal 8 . 4 . 2-2/3 . 2 Choir: Viola, Flute, Gemshorn (Cel) 8, Flutes 4 . 2-2/3 . 2 . 1-3/5, reed =   Swell: Principal, St. Flute, String (Cel) 8, Flute 4 . 2, reeds Pedal: Subbass 16, Principal or Open Flute 8, Choral bass, reeds   In a recent post, I had an idea of using the low 12 stopped pipes as a = common bass to two 16 stops, one being, of course, a Bourdon, and the other with Principal pipes from 13 up. I've never seen it done, and was wondering what other's reaction to it might be. In places where the organ had no open 16, I have left off the 16 Bourdon and played the 8' Principal in the =   pedal an octave lower, being pleased with the results. I realize that = there would be an obvious colour change, but this would not be terribly annoying =   beneath the noise of the manuals???   But I digress...   Although I prefer the sound of unhindered pipes, I think the effect is = most pronounced on the unison and octave principals. Those two ranks should always be unenclosed and as close to the facade as possible. Dividing = the rest of the organ into various swell boxes can easily increase = versatility. In a small organ, room permitting, it would also be helpful to have the = reeds in yet another enclosure, so that you would have: Great: Principal 8 4 Great (encl): Flute 8 4, Principal 2 Swell: String 8 4, Flute 8 4 2 swell II: reeds Pedal: unenclosed 16   If the organ does not have an independent Great, then the enclosed stops could be duplexed evenly, essentially have two identical manuals, with floating principals.   If the organ is larger, reversed stops could be enclosed in separate = boxes. Swell I: Bourdon 8, Gemshorn 4, Principal 2 Swell II: Salicional 8, Flute 4 If the swell boxes are located close to each other the flutes could be = easily used together. If you added mutations, consider the possibilities of = having the nazard in one swell and the tierce in the other; this would give some interesting colour change possibilities.   I could go on and on (hmmm. seems I have!!) ;-)   Neat topic. THanks, Morton.     Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_2f.1269da3c.27e4e605_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In response to = Morton.... &nbsp;truth be told, if you have two ranks you can have <BR>two enclosed divisions and the organ will become more versatile. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;My <BR>preference is to always have rank number one (!), the Open Diapason, = in the <BR>facade, or as close to it as it can get. &nbsp;There is no more = beautiful sound to <BR>me than Diapason-in-your-face!! &nbsp; <BR> <BR>With a small organ, since divisional separation is rather a moot = point, a <BR>theatre organ approach might work well, placing the string(s) in one = box and <BR>the flute(s) in another. &nbsp;Thus with the unenclosed Diapason to = which I would <BR>also add a whisper Dulciana (why put it in the box when you can barely = hear <BR>it anyway??), your versatility is increased. <BR> <BR>If space is a problem, then consider a swell within a swell, possibly = placing <BR>the string &nbsp;section in the back box, since it would more than = likely be the <BR>accompanimental stop to the flute, which would in turn accompany the <BR>Diapason. &nbsp;&nbsp;The Dulciana, in all its genteelity (!), could = accompany either <BR>the flute and/or string, giving the melodic line the opportunity of <BR>expression. <BR> <BR>For larger two-manual organs, I think an enclosed Great is very = helpful in <BR>playing literature, especially that intended for a three manual = instrument. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>&nbsp;The 3/16 Wicks at University UMC - Gainesville, was extremely = versatile <BR>since the two-manual design had been expanded to three manuals simply = by <BR>adding a keyboard! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The Great is simply the Principal = chorus (8 4 2-2/3 2) <BR>and the Choir is the rest of the Great enclosed (Viola, Harmonic = Flute, <BR>Gemshorn, Dolcan, Celeste). &nbsp;&nbsp;Harmonic Flute and Gemshorn = are duplexed to the <BR>Great at 8 and 4. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;While I was there, the Choir = shutters were removed to <BR>facilitate stable tuning and access into the chamber. &nbsp;&nbsp;The = Choir stops are <BR>so mild, and since there is no reed in it, the shutters were not = missed much, <BR>and the added clarity was appreciated. <BR> <BR>If it can be done without too much expense, I would prefer to have the = Great <BR>split in this way, for instance: <BR>Great: &nbsp;Principal 8 . 4 . 2-2/3 . 2 <BR>Choir: &nbsp;Viola, Flute, Gemshorn (Cel) 8, Flutes 4 . 2-2/3 . 2 . = 1-3/5, reed <BR>Swell: &nbsp;Principal, St. Flute, String (Cel) 8, Flute 4 . 2, = &nbsp;reeds <BR>Pedal: &nbsp;&nbsp;Subbass 16, Principal or Open Flute 8, Choral bass, = reeds <BR> <BR>In a recent post, I had an idea of using the low 12 stopped pipes as a = common <BR>bass to two 16 stops, one being, of course, a Bourdon, and the other = with <BR>Principal pipes from 13 up. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I've never seen it done, = and was wondering <BR>what other's reaction to it might be. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;In places = where the organ had no <BR>open 16, I have left off the 16 Bourdon and played the 8' Principal in = the <BR>pedal an octave lower, being pleased with the results. &nbsp;&nbsp;I = realize that there <BR>would be an obvious colour change, but this would not be terribly = annoying <BR>beneath the noise of the manuals??? <BR> <BR>But I digress... <BR> <BR>Although I prefer the sound of unhindered pipes, I think the effect is = most <BR>pronounced on the unison and octave principals. &nbsp;&nbsp;Those two = ranks should <BR>always be unenclosed and as close to the facade as possible. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Dividing the <BR>rest of the organ into various swell boxes can easily increase versatility. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>In a small organ, room permitting, it would also be helpful to have = the reeds <BR>in yet another enclosure, so that you would have: <BR>Great: &nbsp;Principal 8 4 <BR>Great (encl): &nbsp;Flute 8 4, Principal 2 <BR>Swell: String 8 4, Flute 8 4 2 <BR>swell II: &nbsp;reeds <BR>Pedal: &nbsp;unenclosed 16 <BR> <BR>If the organ does not have an independent Great, then the enclosed = stops <BR>could be duplexed evenly, essentially have two identical manuals, with =   <BR>floating principals. <BR> <BR>If the organ is larger, reversed stops could be enclosed in separate = boxes. <BR>Swell I: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Bourdon 8, Gemshorn 4, Principal 2 <BR>Swell II: &nbsp;&nbsp;Salicional 8, Flute 4 &nbsp; <BR>If the swell boxes are located close to each other the flutes could be = easily <BR>used together. &nbsp;&nbsp;If you added mutations, consider the = possibilities of having <BR>the nazard in one swell and the tierce in the other; this would give = some <BR>interesting colour change possibilities. <BR> <BR>I could go on and on (hmmm. &nbsp;&nbsp;seems I have!!) = &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Neat topic. &nbsp;THanks, Morton. <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_2f.1269da3c.27e4e605_boundary--