PipeChat Digest #1921 - Sunday, March 18, 2001
 
Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure?  Two chamber enclosure?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure?  Two chamber enclosure?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Learning Pieces
  by "Roger Brown" <rbrown7@bigpond.net.au>
Re: Learning Pieces
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: ALL READ -- this is getting ridiculous!!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Florida Trip Results (Bethesda Austin)
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Re: Learning Pieces
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: Learning Pieces
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure? Two chamber enclosure? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:41:53 -0800     --------------9989319222EDB810F5C71292 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Well, for purposes of argument, I have TWO specs out for bids ... a completely straight scheme, INCLUDING the Pedal, and a mostly straight scheme with some of the soft stops and the reeds duplexed and unified.   The straight scheme is pretty austere, though I realize it depends on the voicing.   My point about Hinners was not the QUALITY (Moller and Wicks also KNEW how to build good organs ... it was just a toss-up whether they WOULD or not), but that they used the same marketing strategies as Ford, Sears, and Montgomery-Ward (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/17/01 11:19:19 PM !!!First Boot!!!, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > > >> although Hinners in their day was probably the Moller/Wicks of the >> time ... >> the Model T Ford, if you will. > > That may well be, but the Hinners we heard at a previous OHS > convention were > quite nice. The craftsmanship and quality of work were included in > all > organs they made, and it still shows. > > I still believe, and this is one of my main reasons for objecting the > unification, etc., is that once rules began to be broken, each > succeeding > rule is easier to break. > > Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --------------9989319222EDB810F5C71292 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Well, for purposes of argument, I have TWO specs out for bids ... a = completely straight scheme, INCLUDING the Pedal, and a mostly straight scheme with some of the soft stops and the reeds duplexed and unified. <p>The straight scheme is pretty austere, though I realize it depends on the voicing. <p>My point about Hinners was not the QUALITY (Moller and Wicks also KNEW how to build good organs ... it was just a toss-up whether they WOULD or not), but that they used the same marketing strategies as Ford, Sears, and Montgomery-Ward (grin). <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 3/17/01 11:19:19 PM !!!First Boot!!!,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>quilisma@socal.rr.com = writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>although Hinners in their day was probably the Moller/Wicks of the time = ...</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>the Model T Ford, if = you will.</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>That may = well be, but the Hinners we heard at a previous OHS convention = were</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>quite = nice.&nbsp;&nbsp; The craftsmanship and quality of work were included in = all</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>organs = they made, and it still shows.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>I still = believe, and this is one of my main reasons for objecting the</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>unification, etc., is that once rules began to be broken, each = succeeding</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>rule is = easier to break.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>Bruce&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ~&nbsp; Cremona502@cs.com</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>with the = Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!"</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Visit Howling Acres at&nbsp;&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/">http://members.tripod.com/Bru= con502/</A></font></font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------9989319222EDB810F5C71292--    
(back) Subject: Re: Small organs: One chamber enclosure? Two chamber enclosure? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 00:01:28 EST     --part1_22.135ff8c1.27e59b28_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   It's a shame that modern builders don't use the same marketing strategies = as builders of copies. Perhaps there would be fewer people who believe that pipe organs are no longer made.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_22.135ff8c1.27e59b28_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>It's a shame that = modern builders don't use the same marketing strategies as <BR>builders of copies. &nbsp;Perhaps there would be fewer people who = believe that <BR>pipe organs are no longer made. <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_22.135ff8c1.27e59b28_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning Pieces From: "Roger Brown" <rbrown7@bigpond.net.au> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 16:20:50 +1100   On Sat, 17 Mar 2001 19:33:58 -0800 (PST), you wrote:   >Hi- > >Another beginner question. When learning a new piece, >do those of you with a piano background learn it first >on the piano, organ or both.=20   Personally, a bit of both     >Is there anything "wrong" >with learning a piece on the piano with the intent >of learning to play it on the organ=20   The pros and cons are these.=20   - the organ is a quite different instrument to the piano in terms of its touch and the use of different manuals and pedals. Some of those aspects just can't be practiced on the piano obviously.   - with piano practice you can hear more clearly what you are doing so passages requiring neat passage work and synchronization of different voices can be done very usefully on piano. Some romantic stuff works surprisingly well.=20   Stuff like the fugue of that Bach D Minor you are considering work well on the piano and practicing that way will improve the cleanness of your manual work. Pedalling can be added when you transfer to organ.   You do need to understand the differences in touch. My touch when practicing organ music on the piano is quite different to what I use when practicing piano repertoire.   The years I did advanced exams were the years I did the most piano practice and it really helped.   >or am i going to >have to 'relearn' playing it on the organ?( and should >i not learn it first on the piano? )   Yes to an extent, but done the right way I think piano practice can help a great deal - especially if you need to practice organ in a building which has reverberant acoustics which make it more difficult to hear EXACTLY what you are doing=20     Roger     Roger Brown rbrown7@bigpond.net.au http://rogerbrown.tripod.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning Pieces From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 14:10:51 +0800 (CST)       On Sat, 17 Mar 2001, Cindy Adams wrote:   > Is there anything "wrong" > with learning a piece on the piano with the intent > of learning to play it on the organ or am i going to > have to 'relearn' playing it on the organ?( and should > i not learn it first on the piano? ) >     Cindy,     Last summer I subbed at a Christian Science church that was a good distance from my home (I would guess 10-15 miles). I would start to learn the accompaniment for the Sunday solos on my piano... and leave out the bottom notes (which I would play on the pedals on their church organ)...   But I could write in the necessary fingering and pedalling...   Yes, the piano touch and organ touch are a bit different... But I'm accustomed to the touch of my piano...   This method worked out fine for me ... when I went down to this church for my practice, everything fell into shape pretty well...   I also used the same method re: the hymns... they only told me the hymns on Fridays... I think hymns should be planned more in advance.... but the person in charge was afraid that he/she would receive a last minute inspiration... hence they did not let me know the hymns too much in advance... That practice is OK if you know the majority of hymns in a given denomination's hymnal...   Best wishes...       Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member      
(back) Subject: Re: ALL READ -- this is getting ridiculous!! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 01:37:48 EST   Hey Stan:   Hinners built Tracker Theatre organs. If you got your latest Tracker you can read it for your self. An eye opener!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Florida Trip Results (Bethesda Austin) From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 01:51:09 EST   Hey All! Wish I was tan, but I had plenty of other fun, and I did lots of swimming in Florida! The drive was fun, I had company, so we kept each = other occudpied and listened to lots of music aside from buying lots of = fireworks! But back to the grindstone! At any rate...CHEERS to Kim Austin, David Broome, Thom Thomas, and Hal =   Pysher on a WONDERFUL instrument at Bethesda-by-the-Sea! I stayed in Palm Beach and am rather close to Bethesda, and Hal was very generous with the organ and gave me a grand tour of it. What a great installation. It is = truly one of the greatest organs I've played to date. Its choruses are very warm =   and full while not being overbearing. There is an abundance of 8' line = from full Diapasons, both 1sts and 2nds in almost ever division. The organ has plenty of chorus reeds, as well as many warm color reeds with enough bite = for the full ensemble. The mixtures are tame, but they give a wonderful = feeling for Bach. The Tutti is devastating and full all over the room and crowned = by two wonderfully contrasting solo reeds. There is a nice harmonic Chamade = in the back, and a large Tuba in the front. The blend between the two organs = is wonderful. It really handles the room well and has a great presence. The "piece de resistance" is truly the strings are flutes. The strings are = full, lush, and remind me of Wanamakers thin and grainy strings. The strings are =   soloed out by many wonderful flutes. Two favorite flutes being the 8' = Bourdon on the Great, and the 8' Harmonic Flute on the Solo, not to forget the WONDERFUL French and English Horns. If any of you are able to stop by the church or hear the organ, DO IT! =   Every gizmo and console assist ever needed is there. Hal is a wonderful = guy and a great player. Great work Austin!   -Pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning Pieces From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 02:18:41 EST   Cindy,   I'm not as experienced in these matters as other members of this list, but = I can offer you a piece of advice: experiment with a few pieces and go with what you feel comfortable with. I started out practicing my organ music on =   the piano simply because I only had about two hours a week to practice on = an organ. Now it drives me batty to play organ music on the piano: for = instance, the Rinck prelude I'm playing has a series of suspensions built on dotted half notes that CAN NOT be sustained on the piano for their full value. I learned the piece on the piano, had some of the sustained notes wrong, and =   when I sat down at the organ I had some NASTY dissonances! Of course, if = you aren't half blind like I am, you'll probably be fine. heehee   Mandy  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning Pieces From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 09:21:20 -0000   Bruce says: > You will get advice on both sides of the fence, but I have never had any luck > beginning a piece on the piano. If I'm going to play it on the organ, I > learn it on the organ [snip] > By the same token, when I'm going to play a piece of music on the piano, I > learn it on the piano. The same goes for anthems. I almost have to learn > each one twice, since I don't play them the same way on the organ as on the > piano. > > But, it's really a personal preference of what works best for you.   Wise words as always Beaglemeister.   I would however offer two circumstances where the piano reigns supreme in preparing pieces to be played on the organ. The first is for the minute examination of contrapuntal work. So often on modern organs, and particularly (sadly) with Bach's music, players get carried away on a tide of expression pedals, pistons, programmed pre-sets, and stop changes that would have utterly mystified the Master. It can be very helpful to sit down quietly and remind oneself of just what the score is actually saying. And the piano's ability to allow highlighting of individual parts on the same stave, is a most excellent tool for doing this.   The second major area of the piano's pre-eminence is in the preparation of choral music. I am referring particularly to the English cathedral tradition here, where almost invariably, the music program is rehearsed entirely from the piano. Occasionally, there may be a final rehearsal with the organ, but this usually seems to be for the benefit of the accompanist, rather than the choir. How this is viewed within the Americas, no doubt we will shortly discover :-)   Cheers Chris Baker