PipeChat Digest #1929 - Tuesday, March 20, 2001
 
Re: organ music and copyright
  by "Joe Vitacco" <joe@pipeorgancds.com>
Re: Report from Ottumwa, IA (X-posted)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: unenclosed chamades Jardine 1880 Old St. Pat's NYC
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
From Indiana
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
travels, repertory, etc.
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Regional AGO etc. Convention?
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: organ music and copyright
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: From Indiana
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
organs and acoustics
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: organs and acoustics
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: organ music and copyright From: "Joe Vitacco" <joe@pipeorgancds.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 05:37:20 -0500   Typically, anything from the 19 century is in the public domain, unless someone has recently made an arrangement of the music. Coming out with an "edition" really doesn't count, unless the music has really been fully changed - not just corrections. Though, with the new Mendelssohn pieces that Bill Little discovered, the Mendelssohn family still owns them and should have gotten money. The copyright always starts from the first publication of a work.   Joe Vitacco JAV Recordings, Inc. JAV Recordings - http://www.pipeorgancds.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Report from Ottumwa, IA (X-posted) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 06:58:36 -0600   Congrats in a big way, Stephen!   Glenda Sutton   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" > > Honorable mention: Daniel Bayless, Nadia Papayani, Jason Roberts > Second Place: Kevin Walker > First Place: me.        
(back) Subject: Re: unenclosed chamades Jardine 1880 Old St. Pat's NYC From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 09:05:59 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3067923959_13403764_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   Down in Soho. (South of Houston St.) Below the village.   Very much in existence. Occupies a large track of tree-filled property.   Alan   From: ScottFop@aol.com Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2001 13:33:38 EST To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: unenclosed chamades Jardine 1880 Old St. Pat's NYC   Where WAS the "Old" St. Patrick's Cathedral and is the building still in exitnence?       --MS_Mac_OE_3067923959_13403764_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: unenclosed chamades Jardine 1880 Old St. Pat's NYC</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> Down in Soho. &nbsp;(South of Houston St.) &nbsp;Below the village.<BR> <BR> Very much in existence. &nbsp;Occupies a large track of tree-filled = propert=3D y.<BR> <BR> Alan<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <B>From: </B>ScottFop@aol.com<BR> <B>Reply-To: </B>&quot;PipeChat&quot; &lt;pipechat@pipechat.org&gt;<BR> <B>Date: </B>Mon, 19 Mar 2001 13:33:38 EST<BR> <B>To: </B>pipechat@pipechat.org<BR> <B>Subject: </B>Re: unenclosed chamades Jardine 1880 Old St. Pat's NYC<BR> <BR> <FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000A0"><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans = MS">Where WAS t=3D he &quot;Old&quot; St. Patrick's Cathedral and is the building still in = <BR> exitnence?</FONT></FONT></FONT> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3067923959_13403764_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: From Indiana From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 09:04:59 -0500 (EST)     Greetings, all--   I played my final doctoral recital last evening at the Indiana University School of Music in Bloomington. At this point in the process, and at my age (frankly!) I'm glad it's over...it went OK, it is OVER, and no wild parties for me last night, unless you consider two Rolling Rocks at home with my partner a wild party.   I will be returning twice, I think: to defend the dissertation in April, and to graduate in may, returning to church on Sunday May 6 with a huge poofy pink hood to wear to Mass...yes, I know it's just supposed to be for choral offices, but just once....! :) This brings to a grand total of SIX the number of academic hoods I'm entitled to wear...I should join DPA (Diploma Pigs Anonymous). :)   Bloomington is a marvelous town, and I will miss it. If you have never visited, rent "Breaking Away" as it is filmed here...the only difference between then and now is the arrival of sushi restaurants and two more gay bars, both signs of progress IHMO. (That, and the "town versus gown" is not anything like the way the movie makes it out. This isn't a snooty school.)   It's funny--when I was here full time for three years, I was in such overdrive that I hardly really got to know the two recital instruments, even though I played on them countless times. Having been away and 'bonded' with my Aeolian-Skinner in NY, this visit proved a real eye-opener. We give degree recitals on the 1987 Dobson tracker (with classic Italian specifications, for the most part) and the 1965-et cetera Schantz (American Classic, for the most part). The Rosales in Auer Hall is actually nearing completion, though I won't get to play on it! But on this visit I feel I really got to know the two organs I've been using since 1997. Being away let me re-discover the place anew.   I look forward to my return in April. If I had a dollar to spare, I would bet it that all of you have at least heard of the fall foliage in Vermont...but not of the spring foliage in Indiana! The hills are covered with hundreds of thousands of dogwoods, intercut with redbud trees--long, willowy haikus of purple blossoms across the white. Set in the Limestone Country, it is absolutely gorgeous.   If you are considering undergrad, grad, or any other kind of education in music (certificate, diploma, private coaching), I can recommend Indiana as a truly great learning environment. The emphasis is equally upon performance and academics, which I appreciate very much. The school is huge--about 1700 students of all sorts and conditions--which makes for a bracing, democratic environment. I have enjoyed fantastic teaching opportunities here. No, it's not perfect--no place is--but Bloomington and the IU School of Music are cosmopolitan, world-class places to live and study.   As the largest organ department in the country (world?) we have more blessings and more challenges than other departments. Yes, at times it is a real test to try to get along...fifty organists, Catholic and Baptist, gay and straight, Episcopalian and Mennonite, late teens through early fifties, all together at a Big Ten university? It amazes me that things work out so well! My friends here are a wonderfully eclectic group of gifted musicians.   As I look back, I have few if any regrets, except that life isn't long enough to study longer, and I never went swimming in a quarry.   More anon,   Jonathan NYC and Bloomington    
(back) Subject: travels, repertory, etc. From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 09:43:18 EST     --part1_18.a68f77b.27e8c686_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Good morning. I am back in New York, after an exhausting train ride from Toronto. It should have taken 12 hours, but actually took nearly 14. The =   rather surly and belligerent U.S. customs inspectors held us up at the = border (Niagara Falls, New York) for 90 minutes, as they gave everyone a very un-warm welcome to the United States. Dogs sniffing around --- presumably =   for Cannabis. (I'm glad the dogs didn't object to the leftover Chinese = food I was sneaking across the border, nor to those subversive Canadian = tomatoes!) The Parliament in Ottawa is currently debating the legalization of marijuana; and if that goes through, I expect we can expect even longer border delays when entering the U.S. The Toronto Globe and Mail had an editorial on the subject.   Note to Darryl: Please give my regards to John Grew and Olivier Latry. I =   met Mr. Grew at the Oratory in 1999, at the recital of Barrie Cabena. = Grew's former pupil, Steven LaPlante, was also performing in that summer's = series: he was to perform the Franz Schmidt Fantasia and Fugue --- on which I gave =   him some valuable pointers regarding tempos. (I got these back in the 70s =   from Walter Pach, editor of the published score --- who had neglected to include these in the printed score.)   Alas, Mr. Grew didn't bother to come to MY recital!   I heard Olivier Latry perform that year, also, at St. Jean-Baptiste. He = has been nice enough to arrange for me to give a performance next January at Notre Dame in Paris (January 6th).   If you're in Montreal for 10 days, you simply MUST attend the High Mass on =   Sunday (11 a.m.) at l'Oratoire St. Joseph. It is almost like being transported to Heaven. I will be there myself this summer, although I = don't know now if my dates will coincide with yours.   Regarding comments by another subscriber on 20th-century German/Austrian repertory: There ARE some works which are out-of-print; but the = publishers are often willing to provide an "Archivexemplar" --- a photocopy --- if contacted directly. Lots of other works are still in print, however. As = for some of the music being of insufficient merit: one could say that of the literature of just about any country, time, and period! There is a great deal of music which DOES have merit, and which yet goes unperformed by organists in North America. Saying that the scores are hard to obtain is just an excuse for what is, in essence, intellectual complacency and/or laziness.   I have not heard of the organist Brian Franck. If he is performing Franz Schmidt, so much to the good. That does not negate the point I was making =   previously: that FEW North American organists have bothered to investigate =   --- let alone perform! --- this music. I know of another organist living = in Ohio, Karen Schneider, who plays Schmidt: she studied with Planyovsky in Vienna. Steven Laplante --- born in Quebec and raised in British = Columbia, but now living in Brooklyn --- has learned a couple of the scores. Can = you name any other names? (Other than, of course, those who participated in = the summer concert series at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal in 1999, when the =   theme of the series was Franz Schmidt.)   Among the composers whose music is rarely heard on this continent --- but should be! --- are these names: Georg Trexler; Karl Ho"ller; Walter Pach; =   Johann Nepomuk David; Siegfried Reda; Wolfgang Fortner; Heinrich Kaminski; =   Cesar Bresgen; Milos Sokola; Josef Klicka; Ernst Pfiffner; Armin Knab; = Josef Ahrens; Augustinus Franz Kropfreiter; Anton Heiller; Karl Schiske; Conrad Beck; Paul Angerer; Friedrich Metzler; and of course Franz Schmidt. Among =   others.   In addition to all of that: there is quite a body of Scandinavian organ = music which has not been explored at all by North American organists (and I have = to include myself in that category).   Finally, how many U.S. organists are aware of the flourishing school of organ composition in Quebec? Going back to composers like Conrad Letendre and Bernard Piche', and continuing today with such figures as Raymond Daveluy = and Rachel Laurin. Further to the west, Australian-born Barrie Cabena has written a large body of music for organ (much of it still in manuscript, however). If anyone is in Montreal, I suggest they drop by the main music =   store, Archambault, where they will find a representative selection of the =   printed scores of these composers.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_18.a68f77b.27e8c686_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Good morning. &nbsp;I = am back in New York, after an exhausting train ride from <BR>Toronto. &nbsp;It should have taken 12 hours, but actually took nearly = 14. &nbsp;The <BR>rather surly and belligerent U.S. customs inspectors held us up at the = border <BR>(Niagara Falls, New York) for 90 minutes, as they gave everyone a very =   <BR>un-warm welcome to the United States. &nbsp;Dogs sniffing around --- = presumably <BR>for Cannabis. &nbsp;(I'm glad the dogs didn't object to the leftover = Chinese food <BR>I was sneaking across the border, nor to those subversive Canadian = tomatoes!) <BR>&nbsp;The Parliament in Ottawa is currently debating the legalization = of <BR>marijuana; and if that goes through, I expect we can expect even = longer <BR>border delays when entering the U.S. &nbsp;The Toronto Globe and Mail = had an <BR>editorial on the subject. <BR> <BR>Note to Darryl: &nbsp;Please give my regards to John Grew and Olivier = Latry. &nbsp;I <BR>met Mr. Grew at the Oratory in 1999, at the recital of Barrie Cabena. = &nbsp;Grew's <BR>former pupil, Steven LaPlante, was also performing in that summer's = series: <BR>he was to perform the Franz Schmidt Fantasia and Fugue --- on which I = gave <BR>him some valuable pointers regarding tempos. &nbsp;(I got these back = in the 70s <BR>from Walter Pach, editor of the published score --- who had neglected = to <BR>include these in the printed score.) <BR> <BR>Alas, Mr. Grew didn't bother to come to MY recital! <BR> <BR>I heard Olivier Latry perform that year, also, at St. Jean-Baptiste. = &nbsp;&nbsp;He has <BR>been nice enough to arrange for me to give a performance next January = at <BR>Notre Dame in Paris (January 6th). <BR> <BR>If you're in Montreal for 10 days, you simply MUST attend the High = Mass on <BR>Sunday (11 a.m.) at l'Oratoire St. Joseph. &nbsp;It is almost like = being <BR>transported to Heaven. &nbsp;I will be there myself this summer, = although I don't <BR>know now if my dates will coincide with yours. <BR> <BR>Regarding comments by another subscriber on 20th-century = German/Austrian <BR>repertory: &nbsp;&nbsp;There ARE some works which are out-of-print; = but the publishers <BR>are often willing to provide an "Archivexemplar" &nbsp;--- a photocopy = --- if <BR>contacted directly. &nbsp;Lots of other works are still in print, = however. &nbsp;As for <BR>some of the music being of insufficient merit: one could say that of = the <BR>literature of just about any country, time, and period! &nbsp;There is = a great <BR>deal of music which DOES have merit, and which yet goes unperformed by =   <BR>organists in North America. &nbsp;Saying that the scores are hard to = obtain is <BR>just an excuse for what is, in essence, intellectual complacency = and/or <BR>laziness. <BR> <BR>I have not heard of the organist Brian Franck. &nbsp;If he is = performing Franz <BR>Schmidt, so much to the good. &nbsp;That does not negate the point I = was making <BR>previously: that FEW North American organists have bothered to = investigate <BR>--- let alone perform! --- this music. &nbsp;I know of another = organist living in <BR>Ohio, Karen Schneider, who plays Schmidt: she studied with Planyovsky = in <BR>Vienna. &nbsp;Steven Laplante --- born in Quebec and raised in British = Columbia, <BR>but now living in Brooklyn --- has learned a couple of the scores. = &nbsp;Can you <BR>name any other names? &nbsp;(Other than, of course, those who participated in = the <BR>summer concert series at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal in 1999, when = the <BR>theme of the series was Franz Schmidt.) <BR> <BR>Among the composers whose music is rarely heard on this continent --- = but <BR>should be! --- are these names: &nbsp;Georg Trexler; Karl Ho"ller; = Walter Pach; <BR>Johann Nepomuk David; Siegfried Reda; Wolfgang Fortner; Heinrich = Kaminski; <BR>Cesar Bresgen; Milos Sokola; Josef Klicka; Ernst Pfiffner; Armin Knab; = Josef <BR>Ahrens; Augustinus Franz Kropfreiter; Anton Heiller; Karl Schiske; = Conrad <BR>Beck; Paul Angerer; Friedrich Metzler; and of course Franz Schmidt. = &nbsp;Among <BR>others. <BR> <BR>In addition to all of that: there is quite a body of Scandinavian = organ music <BR>which has not been explored at all by North American organists (and I = have to <BR>include myself in that category). <BR> <BR>Finally, how many U.S. organists are aware of the flourishing school = of organ <BR>composition in Quebec? &nbsp;Going back to composers like Conrad = Letendre and <BR>Bernard Piche', and continuing today with such figures as Raymond = Daveluy and <BR>Rachel Laurin. &nbsp;Further to the west, Australian-born Barrie = Cabena has <BR>written a large body of music for organ (much of it still in = manuscript, <BR>however). &nbsp;If anyone is in Montreal, I suggest they drop by the = main music <BR>store, Archambault, where they will find a representative selection of = the <BR>printed scores of these composers. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18.a68f77b.27e8c686_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Regional AGO etc. Convention? From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 10:53:03 -0500   Hi,   Could someone inform me as to what organ related conventions are scheduled in the Northeast for the coming year?   Thanks!   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: organ music and copyright From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 11:05:19 EST     --part1_3c.906386d.27e8d9bf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/20/01 6:47:48 AM !!!First Boot!!!, = joshua@haberman.com writes:     > ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/. > >   Jushua, the director appears to have seven versions. Which is which? 03/17/2001 06:34PM 164,622 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -a4.pdf.gz">Pfeminor-a4.pdf.gz</A> 03/17/2001 06:34PM 116,055 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -a4.ps.gz">Pfeminor-a4.ps.gz</A> 03/17/2001 06:36PM 165,122 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -let.pdf.gz">Pfeminor-let.pdf.gz</A> 03/17/2001 06:35PM 116,011 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -let.ps.gz">Pfeminor-let.ps.gz</A> 03/17/2001 06:33PM 7,833 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -preview.png">Pfeminor-preview.png</A> 03/17/2001 06:33PM 22,159 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= .ly">Pfeminor.ly</A> 03/17/2001 06:33PM 22,479 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= .mid">Pfeminor.mid</A>   Thanky!     Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_3c.906386d.27e8d9bf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/20/01 6:47:48 AM !!!First Boot!!!, joshua@haberman.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/. <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Jushua, <BR>the director appears to have seven versions. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Which = is which? <BR>03/17/2001 06:34PM &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;164,622 = <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -a4.pdf.gz">Pfeminor-a4.pdf.gz</A> <BR>03/17/2001 06:34PM &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;116,055 = <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -a4.ps.gz">Pfeminor-a4.ps.gz</A> <BR>03/17/2001 06:36PM &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;165,122 = <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -let.pdf.gz">Pfeminor-let.pdf.gz</A> <BR>03/17/2001 06:35PM &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;116,011 = <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -let.ps.gz">Pfeminor-let.ps.gz</A> <BR>03/17/2001 06:33PM = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;7,833 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= -preview.png">Pfeminor-preview.png</A> <BR>03/17/2001 06:33PM = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;22,159 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= .ly">Pfeminor.ly</A> <BR>03/17/2001 06:33PM = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;22,479 <A = HREF=3D"ftp://sca.uwaterloo.ca/pub/Mutopia/BruhnsN/BWV847/Pfeminor/Pfeminor= .mid">Pfeminor.mid</A> <BR> <BR>Thanky! <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_3c.906386d.27e8d9bf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: From Indiana From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 11:30:36 EST     --part1_66.d217987.27e8dfac_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Jonathan, Thanks for your wonderful letter. It sounds as though you are resigning from the student world and moving on the the ho-hum world of adults. It = has its own rewards!   But it's still not too late for a skinny dip in the quarry!! ;-)   Congratz, Doc!   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_66.d217987.27e8dfac_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Jonathan, <BR>Thanks for your wonderful letter. &nbsp;&nbsp;It sounds as though you = are resigning <BR>from the student world and moving on the the ho-hum world of adults. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It has <BR>its own rewards! <BR> <BR>But it's still not too late for a skinny dip in the quarry!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Congratz, Doc! <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_66.d217987.27e8dfac_boundary--  
(back) Subject: organs and acoustics From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 12:23:13 EST     --part1_54.119b03a6.27e8ec01_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Someone opined that a master performer can make an organ sound good, even = in a room with dead acoustics.   That may be true. Nevertheless, there is something about the intrinsic nature of the organ which simply demands reverberation, for the instrument = to resonate to full effect. An organ in a dead room is just less successful than an organ in a reverberant room. Many of the great organ composers = took this into account in composing their scores: there are great climaxes followed by rests --- during which the composers clearly expected the climaxes to reverberate throughout the room. Franck's Grande Piece Symphonique is one very good example.   Exactly why it is that the organ demands reverberation is a question I = will leave to the physicists and acousticians. Then, even a symphony orchestra =   sounds to best effect when performing in a reverberant hall. The organ, though, seems to like even more reverberation. The problem then becomes = one of maintaining clarity. If one is playing, say, some of the big pieces of =   Reger, this problem becomes virtually insurmountable!   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_54.119b03a6.27e8ec01_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Someone opined that a = master performer can make an organ sound good, even in <BR>a room with dead acoustics. <BR> <BR>That may be true. &nbsp;Nevertheless, there is something about the = intrinsic <BR>nature of the organ which simply demands reverberation, for the = instrument to <BR>resonate to full effect. &nbsp;An organ in a dead room is just less = successful <BR>than an organ in a reverberant room. &nbsp;Many of the great organ = composers took <BR>this into account in composing their scores: there are great climaxes <BR>followed by rests --- during which the composers clearly expected the <BR>climaxes to reverberate throughout the room. <BR>Franck's Grande Piece Symphonique is one very good example. <BR> <BR>Exactly why it is that the organ demands reverberation is a question I = will <BR>leave to the physicists and acousticians. &nbsp;Then, even a symphony = orchestra <BR>sounds to best effect when performing in a reverberant hall. &nbsp;The = organ, <BR>though, seems to like even more reverberation. &nbsp;The problem then = becomes one <BR>of maintaining clarity. &nbsp;If one is playing, say, some of the big = pieces of <BR>Reger, this problem becomes virtually insurmountable! <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_54.119b03a6.27e8ec01_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: organs and acoustics From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 12:33:07 EST     --part1_104.7f004a.27e8ee53_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/20/01 5:23:54 PM !!!First Boot!!!, ALamirande@aol.com =   writes:     > The problem then becomes one > of maintaining clarity. If one is playing, say, some of the big pieces = of > Reger, this problem becomes virtually insurmountable! > >   Perhaps composers who wrote with reverberant acoustics in mind, also were writing with small audiences in mind. Could it be possible that organ recitals have "always" been attended by smaller groups of people who could =   sit close to the organ so to enjoy clarity, and then also reverberation = which followed.   I find this an excellent way to enjoy a recital in a very reverberant = room. In a dry room I always attach myself to the wall farthest from the organ.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_104.7f004a.27e8ee53_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/20/01 5:23:54 PM !!!First Boot!!!, ALamirande@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The problem then = becomes one <BR>of maintaining clarity. &nbsp;If one is playing, say, some of the big = pieces of <BR>Reger, this problem becomes virtually insurmountable! <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Perhaps composers who wrote with reverberant acoustics in mind, also = were <BR>writing with small audiences in mind. &nbsp;Could it be possible that = organ <BR>recitals have "always" been attended by smaller groups of people who = could <BR>sit close to the organ so to enjoy clarity, and then also = reverberation which <BR>followed. <BR> <BR>I find this an excellent way to enjoy a recital in a very reverberant = room. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>In a dry room I always attach myself to the wall farthest from the = organ. <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_104.7f004a.27e8ee53_boundary--