PipeChat Digest #1930 - Tuesday, March 20, 2001
 
Re: From Indiana
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
CONGRATULATIONS
  by <CdyVanpool@aol.com>
Re: organ music and copyright
  by "Joshua Haberman" <joshua@haberman.com>
organs and audiences
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: organs and audiences
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Rachel Laurin
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: organs and audiences
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Organist/Accompanist Position in Rochester, NY
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Jacksonville Symphony Organ Premiere Review
  by "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@garnet.acns.fsu.edu>
Fw: Toronto
  by "Carl & Grace Snip" <cgscissors@aztec-net.com>
Re: From Indiana
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Regional AGO etc. Convention?
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Jacksonville Symphony Organ Premiere Review
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
ding, dong, the Hamond's DEAD (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Regional AGO etc. Region 2!
  by "Dave Clark" <wurly153@stny.rr.com>
Re: An Apology-Correction
  by "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com>
Why Little Interest in Learning Organ?
  by "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: From Indiana From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 09:48:45 -0800   At 09:04 AM 3/20/2001 -0500, you wrote: >returning to church on Sunday May 6 with a huge poofy pink hood to wear to= =20 >Mass...<snip>   How chic....<hurl>   >This brings to a grand total of SIX the number of academic hoods I'm=20 >entitled to wear...I should join DPA (Diploma Pigs Anonymous).<snip>   Beware the dangers of academia for academia's sake. 'Nuff said.   >If you are considering undergrad, grad, or any other kind of education in >music (certificate, diploma, private coaching), I can recommend Indiana as >a truly great learning environment.<snip>   By the way...what's Her Bishness up to these days? Does she have any=20 teaching duties there at all? I see she's airing new episodes of "The Joy= =20 Of Music And Airline Travel" once more, with a fine program on the Toulouse= =20 Cavaill=E9-Coll a couple of weeks ago aired on the Tyrannical Brainwasher's= =20 Network. I do wish she could strike a deal with PBS to move over there=20 with more emphasis on material other than recycled hymntunes. As for the=20 state of Indiana, I'll leave that to Jim Nabers (who only comes back once a= =20 year to sing at the Indy 500), Dan Quayle, Birch Bayh's kid and Her= Bishness.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: CONGRATULATIONS From: <CdyVanpool@aol.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 13:29:25 EST   CONGRATULATIONS STEPHEN !!!!! Sounds like a job well done!   Van Vanpool  
(back) Subject: Re: organ music and copyright From: "Joshua Haberman" <joshua@haberman.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 10:30:40 -0800   * Cremona502@cs.com (Cremona502@cs.com) wrote: > the director appears to have seven versions. Which is which?   Sorry, I should have clarified this. Those files are as follows:   If you simply want to print the score on letter paper, download Pfeminor-let.pdf.gz for Adobe Acrobat format or Pfeminor-let.ps.gz for postscript format. They're both compressed with gzip, WinZip should take care of this on PC, I don't know about Mac.   Pfeminor-a4.pdf.gz and Pfeminor-a4.ps.gz are corresponding versions for A4 size paper (which is bigger I think, but I've never used it).   Pfeminor-preview.png is an preview image of the score (png is a format designed to be the successor to gif, so it's just a simple image). It contains just the first line of the score so you can see what it looks like, similar to how collections of music will often put the first line of each piece in the table of contents.   Pfeminor.mid is a midi file of the score, also intended for previewing purposes. It's output verbatim from the score, and therefore is not musical at all since there's no human element to it, it's just useful for getting an idea of what it sounds like.   Pfeminor.ly is the source file which contains a note-for-note description of the score -- you then feed it to the typesetting program which outputs all the other files. If you don't have a programming background, I don't recommend looking at this file, it will probably intimidate you. :-)   Joshua   -- Joshua Haberman <joshua@haberman.com>, University of Puget Sound "Delaying decisions" is too often a euphemism for "avoiding thinking." -Bjarne Stroustrup  
(back) Subject: organs and audiences From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 14:11:19 EST     --part1_62.ce06997.27e90557_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In Europe (i.e., the Continent), the principal organ is usually situated = in an organ loft, in which room for any audience is distinctly circumscribed. = Most of the audience would sit on the floor of the church/cathedral. Only = a privileged few --- usually invited, I presume --- would get to sit = anywhere near the console itself.   Closer to home: this sort of layout can be seen at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal (a church which I have occasionally mentioned before!). The = organ loft there does have room for an audience of about 50 people. During the annual summer organ concert series, the privileged few get to sit up = there, for a premium price! (Actually, I think most of those seats are taken up = by regular subscribers --- who would, inevitably, be people living in = Montreal itself or environs.) Most of the audience sits on the floor of the nave. = And, in fact, the sound of the organ is much better and more cohesive when =   heard from the floor. The only one in the loft who actually gets to hear = the organ realistically is, oddly, the performer him/herself, seated at the console. And even there, a drawback exists, for the performer cannot hear =   the Ruckpositiv as it sounds on the floor. Therefore, for any = performance, it is virtually de rigueur to rehearse with an amanuensis on the floor, to =   shout up reactions as to the balance of the sound. When I played there in =   1999, Monsieur Jean-Francois Downing --- nephew of the composer Bernard Piche' --- was kind enough to assist me in this regard. His assistance was =   invaluable in establishing effective tonal balances. (I attended a performance by another participant that year who clearly had not gone = through this essential procedure; and sure enough, his balances were frequently = way off the mark.)   Just don't sit under the immense dome! Or the sound really will become jumbled, as it bounces around for at least 12 seconds! Sit in the nave. = The tickets for the nave are cheaper than those for the tribune (organ loft). =   CAN$12, as I recall.   to the list of various central/eastern European composers long neglected = in North America, I might add the name of Felix Nowowiejski (1877 - 1946), Polish composer, who composed no fewer than nine symphonies for organ, and =   other works for the instrument.   We might also mention Carl Nielsen (1865 - 1931), mainstream Danish = composer, whose very last composition was a massive organ work: Commotio (1931).   Two massive --- and nearly unplayable! --- symphonies for the organ were composed by eccentric Anglo-Indian composer Kaikhosru Sorabji (1892 - = 1988). I'm prepared to forgive anyone who does not attempt these! (In fact, I = know of only one organist who has --- I think the name is Kevin Boyers, of England.)   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_62.ce06997.27e90557_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In Europe (i.e., the = Continent), the principal organ is usually situated in <BR>an organ loft, in which room for any audience is distinctly = circumscribed. &nbsp; <BR>Most of the audience would sit on the floor of the church/cathedral. = &nbsp;Only a <BR>privileged few --- usually invited, I presume --- would get to sit = anywhere <BR>near the console itself. <BR> <BR>Closer to home: this sort of layout can be seen at l'Oratoire St. = Joseph, <BR>Montreal (a church which I have occasionally mentioned before!). = &nbsp;The organ <BR>loft there does have room for an audience of about 50 people. = &nbsp;During the <BR>annual summer organ concert series, the privileged few get to sit up = there, <BR>for a premium price! &nbsp;(Actually, I think most of those seats are = taken up by <BR>regular subscribers --- who would, inevitably, be people living in = Montreal <BR>itself or environs.) &nbsp;&nbsp;Most of the audience sits on the = floor of the nave. &nbsp; <BR>And, in fact, the sound of the organ is much better and more cohesive when <BR>heard from the floor. &nbsp;The only one in the loft who actually gets = to hear the <BR>organ realistically is, oddly, the performer him/herself, seated at = the <BR>console. &nbsp;And even there, a drawback exists, for the performer = cannot hear <BR>the Ruckpositiv as it sounds on the floor. &nbsp;Therefore, for any = performance, <BR>it is virtually de rigueur to rehearse with an amanuensis on the = floor, to <BR>shout up reactions as to the balance of the sound. &nbsp;When I played = there in <BR>1999, Monsieur Jean-Francois Downing --- nephew of the composer = Bernard <BR>Piche' --- was kind enough to assist me in this regard. His assistance = was <BR>invaluable in establishing effective tonal balances. (I attended a <BR>performance by another participant that year who clearly had not gone = through <BR>this essential procedure; and sure enough, his balances were = frequently way <BR>off the mark.) <BR> <BR>Just don't sit under the immense dome! &nbsp;Or the sound really will = become <BR>jumbled, as it bounces around for at least 12 seconds! &nbsp;Sit in = the nave. &nbsp;The <BR>tickets for the nave are cheaper than those for the tribune (organ = loft). &nbsp; <BR>CAN$12, as I recall. <BR> <BR>to the list of various central/eastern European composers long = neglected in <BR>North America, I might add the name of Felix Nowowiejski (1877 - = 1946), <BR>Polish composer, who composed no fewer than nine symphonies for organ, = and <BR>other works for the instrument. <BR> <BR>We might also mention Carl Nielsen (1865 - 1931), mainstream Danish = composer, <BR>whose very last composition was a massive organ work: Commotio (1931). <BR> <BR>Two massive --- and nearly unplayable! --- symphonies for the organ = were <BR>composed by eccentric Anglo-Indian composer Kaikhosru Sorabji (1892 - = 1988). &nbsp; <BR>I'm prepared to forgive anyone who does not attempt these! &nbsp;(In = fact, I know <BR>of only one organist who has --- I think the name is Kevin Boyers, of <BR>England.) <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_62.ce06997.27e90557_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: organs and audiences From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 14:14:27 -0500   Gee Arthur....you sure like talking about the oratory!   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Rachel Laurin From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 15:17:27 -0500   all this recent talk about Montreal organists...........   Rachel is a member of Organ Chat, and a dear friend of mine. If anyone = would like to write to her directly, I have her e-mail address.........write to = me privately, and I'll give it to anyone who wants it.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: organs and audiences From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 17:27:08 EST     --part1_45.3e37410.27e9333c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/20/01 7:12:20 PM !!!First Boot!!!, ALamirande@aol.com =   writes:     > We might also mention Carl Nielsen (1865 - 1931), mainstream Danish > composer, > whose very last composition was a massive organ work: Commotio (1931). > > I have a wonderful recording of Commotio and now have the score just for laughs. I like the way Nielsen thinks musically and wish that his music = was more accessible. Modern music is not interesting to learn for me, = although much is interesting to hear.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_45.3e37410.27e9333c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/20/01 7:12:20 PM !!!First Boot!!!, ALamirande@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">We might also = mention Carl Nielsen (1865 - 1931), mainstream Danish <BR>composer, <BR>whose very last composition was a massive organ work: Commotio (1931). =   <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I have a wonderful recording of Commotio and now = have the score just for <BR>laughs. &nbsp;&nbsp;I like the way Nielsen thinks musically and wish = that his music was <BR>more accessible. &nbsp;Modern music is not interesting to learn for = me, although <BR>much is interesting to hear. <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_45.3e37410.27e9333c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Organist/Accompanist Position in Rochester, NY From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 19:50:20 -0500   John Knox Presbyterian Church, 3233 West Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14626 wishes to hire an Organist/Accompanist to start on Sunday, July 1. Organ = is a Rodgers-Glasgow 740 (2-manuals, full pedals, 52 ranks, 2 levels of = memory, a transposer, 2 octaves of chimes)   Sunday services at 10 A.M.; Chancel Choir practice Wednesday evenings 7:30 P.M. - 9 P.M. and 1/2 hour before Sunday worship service.   July and August Sunday Worship services only - no choir practice - $150 (less payroll taxes) paid every two weeks.   September - June Sunday Worship services and Chancel Choir practices (approx. 8 hours work per 2 weeks- $195 (less payroll taxes) paid every = two weeks.   Please phone Barbara at (716) 225-0812 for more information.   Regards, Ken Evans    
(back) Subject: Jacksonville Symphony Organ Premiere Review From: "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@garnet.acns.fsu.edu> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 20:16:54 -0500     Dear list,   On Sunday I attended the opening concert on the Jacksonville Symphony's new vintage 1912 Casavant pipe organ. I had a very good seat on the front row of the loge section of the lower balcony directly centered and level with the organ. This was my first visit to Jacoby Symphony Hall and I must =   say the I was very impressed by it. Designed in the shoebox style similar to Symphony Hall in Boston, the acoustics were excellent and one can hear everything clearly from most any spot in the hall.   I had been waiting for this concert since I first hear about the symphony's efforts to get a pipe organ back in 1996. The large crowd was charged with anticipation of the start of the much awaited concert. Before =   the musical part began, there was a short recognition of some of the = donors to the organ project and then a presentation of a silver organ pipe to the =   chair of the Jacksonville City Council to recognize the city's role in bringing the organ to Jacksonville and to acknowledge that the organ is owned by the City of Jacksonville, thus making it a modern day "Municipal Organ".   After the presentation, the audience numbering close to 1,600 gave a warm =   welcome to conductor, Fabio Mechetti, and guest recitalist, Matt Curlee. Thusly, the orchestra began the Saint-Saens Symphony # 3 in C minor. I waited patiently through the first 15 minutes of the piece until the organ =   finally sounded for the first time. The whole audience strained to hear as =   the first dulcet tones as they floated softly over the orchestra. The = piece continued and I awaited the big moment when the organ would burst forth. = My heart rate quickened as the moment approached and then the big theme was stated on a fairly full organ sound. This was the first time we heard it. The audience gave them a well deserved round of applause.   A short intermission preceded the organ's solo debut. The lights dimmed = so that only the organ's facade and console were illuminated. Mr. Curlee pl ayed the Prelude and Fugue on the name of Alain by Durufle. Some very lovely flute and reed stops were used. The piece crescendoed to a big finale.   Then came the moment I had been waiting for as the organ and orchestra played one of my all time favorite pieces, Jongen's Symphonie Concertante. =   Unlike the Saint-Saens where the organ serves in a more supporting role, the Jongen treats the organ like a second orchestra. Both orchestra and organ exchange solo lines and phrases and complement each other. I had wondered during the entire concert where the Echo organ had been = installed, and at the end of the sleepy and super sweet third movement I found out. The Echo strings sounded out the last chordal section and allowed me to realize that I was sitting right under the Echo. I had waited the whole concert to hear the fourth movement of the Jongen, and I was not disappointed. It was during this movement that Mr. Curlee let the organ = out fully climaxing with the big Tuba Mirabilis 16, 8, 4 unit and full organ = on the final chord. The mood of the room at the end of that piece was incredible. The entire audience literally leaped to their feet with joy = and gave the musicians a standing ovation. The audience was delighted when = Matt Curlee sat back down at the console to play the encore. It was a delightful piece that showed off some more solo colors and the Tuba again at the end. The audience gave him another standing ovation and would have loved for him to play another encore but that did not happen. Reluctant to =   leave everyone milled around for a moment before exiting back into the rainy and stormy evening.   It has been a long wait for that moment and now that it is past I can report that Jacksonville has an organ that equals any other symphony organ =   in the United States. I look forward to attending many more concerts and recitals on this historic organ.   Sincerely,   Will Scarboro    
(back) Subject: Fw: Toronto From: "Carl & Grace Snip" <cgscissors@aztec-net.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 21:40:06 -0500   > I cannot remember for certain, since the last time I was in Toronto was > 1974, but I think the Toronto Transit was still running spotlessly clean > PCC cars, a North American staple through the 1930's. I'm sure they've > been replaced by now. To affix blame as to where electric trollies in = the > US went, one only has to blame General Motors, as was proved in lawsuit > after lawsuit, all to no avail. GM never got enough political muscle in > Canada to do the same, although I'm sure they tried. > > DeserTboB   This one may be getting a wee bit off topic (grin), but a bit o' fun won't hurt...   The TTC does indeed run both a subway system and what Torontonians call streetcars; but the interurban electric railway (called the "radial") was, to my knowledge, indeed a Canadian victim of the rapacious business expansion practices of GM. A museum dedicated to the radial railways actually uses a portion of the original Toronto by Guelph right-of-way = (off the Guelph Line, north of Highway 401).    
(back) Subject: Re: From Indiana From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 21:54:26 -0500   Jonathan-   Hope you return to Bloomtown in October for IUPUI Homecoming = festivities. I'll be playing IUPUI's steam calliope again this year in their parade. ps -I'm the little skinny guy at the 32-note keyboard with a faceful of wet steam.   Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Regional AGO etc. Convention? From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 22:04:51 -0500 (EST)   > Could someone inform me as to what organ related conventions are = scheduled > in the Northeast for the coming year?   Behtlehem PA AGO Region III regional convention with a real fine line-up of artists, etc. Actual convention begins Sunday 24 June wtih a 4 p.m. John Weaver recital; it closes Wednesday night 27 June. Pre and post-convention items as well. Felix Hell is one of the artists, too.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Jacksonville Symphony Organ Premiere Review From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 22:05:11 EST     --part1_18.a78148d.27e97467_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Will, Thanks so much for your review. I see you had the same experience during = the Saint-Saens that I did. I wonder how often people get to really = experience this piece in this way. Unfortunately, our seats were in the center of = the lower balcony, but just beneath the upper balcony, so we did not get to experience the Echo as you did. I guess the best place to sit in the = hall for programs with organ is in the center of the lower level to get the = right perspective.   There was no "pipe presentation" at the Friday concert. That was a = really great gesture and City Council certainly does like shiney awards! ;-)   I'm really glad that Matt Curlee changed his encore piece. I wonder what = it was that he used on Sunday.   And again, I'm really sorry that being sick prevented me from coming back = for the Sunday performance. I'm glad you were also impressed with the new "digs". Another very, VERY interesting feature is the large displays of cough drops at the first level entrances. They are FREE, and are wrapped = in "noise-proof" paper. Now THAT'S class!!   Of course, your symphony visit is not complete until you dined at = Juilette's in the Omni. Yummy! Yummy! Yummy!   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_18.a78148d.27e97467_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Will, <BR>Thanks so much for your review. &nbsp;I see you had the same = experience during the <BR>Saint-Saens that I did. &nbsp;&nbsp;I wonder how often people get to = really experience <BR>this piece in this way. &nbsp;&nbsp;Unfortunately, our seats were in = the center of the <BR>lower balcony, but just beneath the upper balcony, so we did not get = to <BR>experience the Echo as you did. &nbsp;&nbsp;I guess the best place to = sit in the hall <BR>for programs with organ is in the center of the lower level to get the = right <BR>perspective. <BR> <BR>There was no "pipe presentation" at the Friday concert. = &nbsp;&nbsp;That was a really <BR>great gesture and City Council certainly does like shiney awards! = &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I'm really glad that Matt Curlee changed his encore piece. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I wonder what it <BR>was that he used on Sunday. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>And again, I'm really sorry that being sick prevented me from coming = back for <BR>the Sunday performance. &nbsp;&nbsp;I'm glad you were also impressed = with the new <BR>"digs". &nbsp;&nbsp;Another very, VERY interesting feature is the = large displays of <BR>cough drops at the first level entrances. &nbsp;&nbsp;They are FREE, = and are wrapped in <BR>"noise-proof" paper. &nbsp;Now THAT'S class!! <BR> <BR>Of course, your symphony visit is not complete until you dined at = Juilette's <BR>in the Omni. &nbsp;&nbsp;Yummy! &nbsp;Yummy! &nbsp;Yummy! <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18.a78148d.27e97467_boundary--  
(back) Subject: ding, dong, the Hamond's DEAD (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 20:15:22 -0800   Nothing but static tonight when I turned it on to play Evensong ... and the donor was THERE (grin). I told the Rector after church I'm done with it ... I've called everybody I know ... there are no parts ... it can't be fixed ... end of story.   It happened the little Kawai spinet organ was in the back of the church, so I played it ... as I went to start the Office Hymn, *IT* died (grin). The ONLY reliable organ in the PLACE is the old Hammond spinet in the choir room (grin), but I'm not playing THAT for Easter.   Should be INteresting ...   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Regional AGO etc. Region 2! From: "Dave Clark" <wurly153@stny.rr.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 23:22:56 -0500   John and others; The Binghamton NY chapter of the AGO will be hosting the Region 2 (NY/NJ) convention from June 24 through June 28. We have started a web page with some of the details. You can check it out at htte://www.ago2001region2.org. There are not a lot of us working on it so the web pages have some "blanks". I am the registrar and will mail you a real live brochure if you send me your name and address. The convention is open to everyone We will have a little of everything. 24 workshops, performers include Olivier Latry, Thomas Murray, Katie Pardee, NYS Baroque Orchestra, Searle Wright, David Peckham, Andy Kotylo, Jonathan Biggers, Syracuse Childrens Choir plus others. Many commissioned works, theatre organ concert, optional Organ/Crawl and Winery tour through the Finger Lakes. You might even get to hear my Wurlitzer 153 band organ!   Dave Clark     John Vanderlee wrote:   > Hi, > > Could someone inform me as to what organ related conventions are = scheduled > in the Northeast for the coming year? > > Thanks! > > John V > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: An Apology-Correction From: "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 18:34:05 -0800 (PST)   I meant to say "for posting long quotes" with messages and filling up everyone's mailbox. :-)   --- Cindy Adams <piperheaven@yahoo.com> wrote: > Dear PipeChat List, > > I am very sorry for posting quotes with my messages. > This was not intentional. I will certainly be > careful > about this in the future. I hope everyone still > loves > me! :-) > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. > http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Why Little Interest in Learning Organ? From: "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 18:48:28 -0800 (PST)   Hi-   I have been wondering for a while why so few folks take up organ? I realize the difficulty of having an instrument available for practice but what are some other reasons?   Also, do any of you try to create interest and appreciation in children and young people for the organ?   Cindy   Who had her second organ lesson today!! YEAH!!     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/