PipeChat Digest #1933 - Wednesday, March 21, 2001
 
Re: Jacksonville Symphony Organ stoplist
  by "Gary Blevins" <gsblvns@camalott.com>
Re: Allen Organs
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
cheap rents for students/thoughts on brevity of life
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1931 - 03/21/01
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: organs and acoustics
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Allen Organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Allen Organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Ding Dong, The Hammond's Dead
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Allen Organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Allen Organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: San Francisco
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Why Little Interest in Learning Organ? one useless opinion
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: From Indiana
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Jacksonville Symphony Organ stoplist From: "Gary Blevins" <gsblvns@camalott.com> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:57:19 -0600   Hello Steve, There's a copy of the stoplist for the Jacksonville organ in the March = issue of The American Organist magazine, pg.75.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "S LaManna" <showstager@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2001 7:09 AM Subject: Re: Jacksonville Symphony Organ Premiere Review     > Is there anyway to get a spec on teh Jacksonville Organ? > > Thanks! > > > > Steve LaManna > AVI Creative Show Services > 7101 Presidents Drive Suite 105 > Orlando, FL 32809 > Toll Free: 888.251.9651 x3714 FAX:407.854.0969 > A national leader in full service production, staging, video, graphics = and > creative services for the meetings, incentive and convention industries. > http://www.aviinc.com/cs > > _________________________________________________________________ > Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organs From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 12:55:44 EST   In a message dated 3/21/01 10:53:35 AM Central Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << Check the model number (lift up the lid and it should be on a plate on = the back wall of the console) ... >>   Thanks for the info, Bob, Ron, and Bud. It's good to know how much to = pay/not pay for these instruments. I had a feeling this one was a good price, but wasn't sure.   It was a T-3, I've since discovered. Sold for 600.00. If you have any more =   opinions on the T-3, please let me know, as it sounds like a possibility = for me. If I knew I had the room for an instrument this size right now (I'd = have to put the speaker in a separate room!), I'd be depressed that I didn't = buy this one, hehe. But it did need a bit of work, and I don't as of yet have = the knowledge to maintain it myself, nor the money to pay to have it = maintained, so it was better off with someone else...sniff sniff...   Mandy  
(back) Subject: cheap rents for students/thoughts on brevity of life From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 13:40:34 EST     --part1_62.ce928a1.27ea4fa2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   If you're a music student and looking for cheap rents, I recommend = Montreal.   first of all: if you're a U.S. citizen, the rate of exchange will be in = your favour.   second: the rents in Montreal are remarkably low, compared to almost any major (or even mid-sized) U.S. city; and most certainly a lot cheaper than =   Toronto or Vancouver. And Montreal has some excellent music schools, at McGill University (English-language) and Universite' de Montre'al (French language). The city also abounds in great organs --- some of them dating from the 19th century and historic. L'Eglise de Tres Saint Nom de Jesus (Church of the Holy Name of Jesus); = St. Jean-Baptiste; Notre Dame Basilica; la Cathedrale de Marie la Reine du = Monde (Cathedral of Mary, Queen of the World); and, of course, l'Oratoire St. Joseph (the great Beckerath there dates from 1960). Also the Grande Seminaire. And there is an interesting modern tracker at Christ Church Cathedral (although the acoustics there are very dry).   I always stay at a place on Cote des Neiges, close by to the Oratory. But =   for a long-term stay, I'd recommend the "Plateau" --- to the east of Parc Mont Royal. It's very easy to get around Montreal, on the Metro. In the Plateau, though, you'll have to speak French. Or use sign language!   Naturally, the closer you are to downtown (Centre Ville), the higher the rents will get.   Re: Christopher Putnam in San Francisco: I met him briefly, last Nov. = 11th. I had no idea he was ill. (Maybe he didn't know it, either, back then?) = It was only then that I learned John Fenstermaker had retired, and been = replaced by Mr. Putnam.   Well, one never knows. Back a few years ago, when I was working in the Godbox in New York, I'd resort (for some liquid relief from all the office =   aggravation!) to the West End Cafe (popular with Columbia University students). They had a friendly bartender who hailed from Mississippi, = whom I taught to make a "shipwreck". (That's a specialty of the Hyatt Hotel in Vancouver: a martini in which Scotch is substituted for vermouth.) He looked perfectly healthy to me. A few months later, when I hadn't seen = him around for a while, I made inquiries, and was told that he was "sick". = Not long afterwards, I was told he was dead. The Big A, it seemed.   Same thing happened to a former co-worker at the Professional Examination Service (that's the company in the GodBox for which I worked). Saw him in = a barber shop some time after he left the company: seemed quite healthy to = me. A year later, I was told he had died. Same cause of death.   I'm older now than my father was, when he died (of a brain tumor). Hope = I've inherited my mother's genes. (She's nearly 98, and still mentally alert, = if physically feeble.)   Considering how short life is, I wonder why it is that people treat each other so uncharitably? Why, there are some who are known to have carried = a grudge for 25 years and more! (Won't name any names, but some of them are =   located in the aforementioned GodBox!) It does all seem rather silly, and = in the cosmic scope of things, utterly pointless.   That's one thing about the Catholics: they admit they are sinners, in = need of repentance and forgiveness. No claims to being either "elect" or = "saved".   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_62.ce928a1.27ea4fa2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>If you're a music = student and looking for cheap rents, I recommend Montreal. <BR> <BR>first of all: if you're a U.S. citizen, the rate of exchange will be = in your <BR>favour. <BR> <BR>second: the rents in Montreal are remarkably low, compared to almost = any <BR>major (or even mid-sized) U.S. city; and most certainly a lot cheaper = than <BR>Toronto or Vancouver. &nbsp;And Montreal has some excellent music = schools, at <BR>McGill University (English-language) and Universite' de Montre'al (French <BR>language). &nbsp;The city also abounds in great organs --- some of = them dating <BR>from the 19th century and historic. <BR>L'Eglise de Tres Saint Nom de Jesus (Church of the Holy Name of = Jesus); St. <BR>Jean-Baptiste; Notre Dame Basilica; la Cathedrale de Marie la Reine du = Monde <BR>(Cathedral of Mary, Queen of the World); and, of course, l'Oratoire = St. <BR>Joseph (the great Beckerath there dates from 1960). &nbsp;Also the = Grande <BR>Seminaire. &nbsp;And there is an interesting modern tracker at Christ = Church <BR>Cathedral (although the acoustics there are very dry). <BR> <BR>I always stay at a place on Cote des Neiges, close by to the Oratory. = &nbsp;But <BR>for a long-term stay, I'd recommend the "Plateau" --- to the east of = Parc <BR>Mont Royal. &nbsp;It's very easy to get around Montreal, on the Metro. = &nbsp;In the <BR>Plateau, though, you'll have to speak French. &nbsp;Or use sign = language! <BR> <BR>Naturally, the closer you are to downtown (Centre Ville), the higher = the <BR>rents will get. <BR> <BR>Re: Christopher Putnam in San Francisco: I met him briefly, last Nov. = 11th. &nbsp; <BR>I had no idea he was ill. &nbsp;(Maybe he didn't know it, either, back = then?) &nbsp;It <BR>was only then that I learned John Fenstermaker had retired, and been = replaced <BR>by Mr. Putnam. <BR> <BR>Well, one never knows. &nbsp;Back a few years ago, when I was working = in the <BR>Godbox in New York, I'd resort (for some liquid relief from all the = office <BR>aggravation!) to the West End Cafe (popular with Columbia University <BR>students). &nbsp;They had a friendly bartender who hailed from = Mississippi, whom I <BR>taught to make a "shipwreck". &nbsp;(That's a specialty of the Hyatt = Hotel in <BR>Vancouver: &nbsp;a martini in which Scotch is substituted for = vermouth.) &nbsp;He <BR>looked perfectly healthy to me. &nbsp;A few months later, when I = hadn't seen him <BR>around for a while, I made inquiries, and was told that he was "sick". = &nbsp;Not <BR>long afterwards, I was told he was dead. &nbsp;The Big A, it seemed. = &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Same thing happened to a former co-worker at the Professional = Examination <BR>Service (that's the company in the GodBox for which I worked). = &nbsp;Saw him in a <BR>barber shop some time after he left the company: seemed quite healthy = to me. &nbsp; <BR>A year later, I was told he had died. &nbsp;Same cause of death. <BR> <BR>I'm older now than my father was, when he died (of a brain tumor). = &nbsp;Hope I've <BR>inherited my mother's genes. &nbsp;(She's nearly 98, and still = mentally alert, if <BR>physically feeble.) <BR> <BR>Considering how short life is, I wonder why it is that people treat = each <BR>other so uncharitably? &nbsp;Why, there are some who are known to have = carried a <BR>grudge for 25 years and more! &nbsp;(Won't name any names, but some of = them are <BR>located in the aforementioned GodBox!) &nbsp;It does all seem rather = silly, and in <BR>the cosmic scope of things, utterly pointless. <BR> <BR>That's one thing about the Catholics: &nbsp;they admit they are = sinners, in need <BR>of repentance and forgiveness. &nbsp;No claims to being either "elect" = or "saved". <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_62.ce928a1.27ea4fa2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1931 - 03/21/01 From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 10:56:22 -0800   At 10:01 AM 3/21/2001 -0500, you wrote: >We'd hold the place while you and a hand picked >design team did your duty for the glory of Disney. <snip>   No, you can hold THEM at bay, too!!   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: organs and acoustics From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:13:22 -0800   At 09:17 AM 3/21/2001 -0800, you wrote:   >One of my teachers, Janette Fishell, stressed a technique she called >"over-legato," where you slithered across the keyboard and pedals letting =   >notes >barely overlap whereever it worked musically, and especially for romantic =   >works or the melody in a chorale prelude.<snip>   That's an old Virgil Fox technique that he'd overdo constantly.   >This compensates quite well in a dry room.<snip>   Well, in a DRY room, you can get away with it. In a live room, the effect =   is that the organist sound drunk or the action is failing!   >I DO HOWEVER, BELIEVE THAT ACOUSTICS ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT STOP IN ANY >ORGAN!<snip>   True enough. Unfortunately, architects in the US are still woefully uneducated and unaware of the value of good acoustics in musical presentation, preferring instead to still render anechoic chambers with vast PA systems for the delivery of the weekly "sales pitch".   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:08:44 -0800   At 08:56 AM 3/21/2001 -0800, you wrote: >I don't remember whether a TC-3 has standard overhanging manuals or not=20 >...<snip>   Yes, with wood keys.   >the smaller organs didn't ... they had "waterfall" keyboards like an old=20 >Hammond.<snip>   Back in the '50s, yes. In the '60s, no. Even the TC-1 had overhanging,=20 tilted manuals per AGO spec, as new injection molding techniques introduced= =20 in the late '50s make single casting of the plastic keys possible. The OLD= =20 S- and T- series with tubes had the "piano" keys, =E1 la Hammond, BaWLd-One,= =20 Lowrey and others.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:16:32 -0800   At 12:17 PM 3/21/2001 -0500, you wrote: >I gave mine to a church that had an AOB three years >younger that bit the dust after only 10 years of service. I played the = AOB >when it was first installed in 1981, and when I opened the console the >roll top, you guessed it unraveled in my hand. I knew then it was = trouble. >Cost of the AOB $30,000. Cost of the Allen $14,000. I guess cost doesn't >always mean quality.<snip>   AOB went the Bob Saville route on tone generation, and tended to skimp in other areas of quality. They'd sound good, but consoles would simply fall =   apart. Also, they suffered, like everyone else, from the foam surround disease, and their speaker systems would disintigrate. That's really not = a reflection on the organ proper, as many non-technical people make the mistake of doing. However, AOB did have some quality issues indeed.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Ding Dong, The Hammond's Dead From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:18:46 -0800   At 12:26 PM 3/21/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Richard Biggs used to tell a story of how the Water motor would >fail<snip>   Richard Keyes Biggs, who held sway for decades over the Casavant at = Blessed Sacrament in Hollywood?   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:29:38 -0800   At 12:55 PM 3/21/2001 -0500, you wrote: >It was a T-3, I've since discovered.<snip>   No such model, as far as I remember. TC-3, yes, the first Allen solid=20 state model in the regulation updated Allen "big" two manual console that=20 made its debut in 1945. Germanium transistors, 3=BD ranks of unified=20 oscillators, comfy console with wood keys and real AGO pedals. $600 is=20 pretty fair for these, although I would have haggled...a bit.   Early TCs were all germanium based and used their Gyrophonic projectors to= =20 provide "ensemble", and yes, the Gyros were huge and heavy. Allen made=20 several "home" models of the Gyro, too, most of these being seen on home=20 models, such as the old Carousel. In 1965, Allen updated and improved=20 circuitry, going to silicon transistors and eliminating the old disk Gyros= =20 with "Electronic Whind", a patented filtered white noise generator=20 superimposed on the organ's Vcc supply. It worked pretty well! Later TCs= =20 are more desirable, IMHO, although the early TCs were every bit as reliable.   Would I have taken the TC-3 for a practice organ at $500? You betcha.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 11:53:44 -0800   Well, whadda ya want (grin)! I BOUGHT my TC-1 in the '50s (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 08:56 AM 3/21/2001 -0800, you wrote: > >I don't remember whether a TC-3 has standard overhanging manuals or no= t > >...<snip> > > Yes, with wood keys. > > >the smaller organs didn't ... they had "waterfall" keyboards like an o= ld > >Hammond.<snip> > > Back in the '50s, yes. In the '60s, no. Even the TC-1 had overhanging= , > tilted manuals per AGO spec, as new injection molding techniques introd= uced > in the late '50s make single casting of the plastic keys possible. The= OLD > S- and T- series with tubes had the "piano" keys, =E1 la Hammond, BaWLd= -One, > Lowrey and others. > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: San Francisco From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 15:21:56 -0600   At 10:47 AM 3/21/01 -0500, you wrote: >If you want to attend Mass in San Francisco, I recommend St. Mary's >Cathedral, located near the consulate of the People's Republic of China = and >close to Japantown. Strange directions to locate a church.....If it is the church I'm thinking =   of...isn't that located at the corner of Grant Ave (main street in chinatown) and California Street (which has one of the cable car lines) ??   jch    
(back) Subject: Re: Why Little Interest in Learning Organ? one useless opinion From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 17:10:02 EST   In a message dated 3/21/01 0:00:25 AM EST, piperheaven@yahoo.com writes:   > > up organ? I realize the difficulty of having an > instrument available for practice but what are some > other reasons? Just my useless and not-very-highly-regarded opinion here... Parents are not taking the initiative to have their childern learn to play = a musical instrument, or even to participate in musical activities (like f'rinstance - childern's choir, school band programs, etc.). It is as much = a reluctance on the part of parents to make a commitment as it may be a lack = of interest on the part of the kids. Most parents now-a-days are products of = the 1970's do-your-own-thing attitude, they having decided years ago that = "I'll never force my kids to do the things my parents made me do" - susch as = music lessons, etc..   ALSO< let's face it...the value placed on an organist's time and talent = (not to mention YEARS of lesons and endless hours spent in the solitude of practice is so minimal, most people do not want to make the investment for =   such meager returns as a part-timers stipend at the local church. The competition for the few "good" jobs out there as full-time church = musicians is still pretty stiff, and it seems like only those with a gold-plated pedigree (such as a DMA) are even considered.   Lest you think me a full-blown pessimist, I should note that I do have an Organist-Choirmaster job, and I also operate a PIpe Organ servicing = business, so I am involved in trying to be a part of the solution, not just an = observer of the problem.   FWIW   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: From Indiana From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 17:22:40 -0500   > From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> > Subject: Re: From Indiana > > The one-l lama, he's a priest. > The two-l llama, he's a beast. > And I would bet a silk pajama > There isn't any three-l lllama. > Well, wouldn't it be just an unintended conflagration in a major building?   Alan