PipeChat Digest #1946 - Saturday, March 24, 2001
 
PROBLEM SOLVED
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Dust in Pipes
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
RE: gracecom locaion s.f.
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Bach Complete Organ Works
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
Re: PROBLEM SOLVED
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Jimmy Culp's CD
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
St. Jean Baptiste, NYC
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
Re: PROBLEM SOLVED
  by "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net>
RE: St. Jean Baptiste, NYC
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: St. Jean Baptiste, NYC
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
evolution
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: PROBLEM SOLVED
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Indiana et al
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Jimmy Culp's CD
  by "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com>
Re: evolution
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Re: Jimmy Culp's CD
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: San Francisco
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: PROBLEM SOLVED From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 07:45:50 -0600   Good morning Folks   As I suspected there was a bit of corruption that happened with the List Server sometime late on Thursday night or early Friday morning. After doing a bunch of maintenance on the server and running some utilities i discovered that there was a piece of corrupt mail that was locking up the server. And in some maybe other related corruption the server changed its date to October 4, 2000. I don't know if that was related to the corrupt mail or not.   But as of this morning things seem to be running as normal again. I know that once I got the date and time reset and found and removed the corrupt mail the server started spewing out mail like mad. When I started there were something like 165 messages in the outgoing mail queue and it is now down to 12 pieces waiting to be delivered.   Sorry about the problem and just a note, for those of you that receive the list as a Digest you might find that some of your digests have the date of 10/4/00 - that has to do with the corruption problems.   And now back to Happy PipeChatting!   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Dust in Pipes From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 21:59:15 +0800   Ron, even if it's in the middle of the swell box? Would you have a student with little knowledge into the organ to fiddle with pipes? Not me!! Cindy tell the organist. He'll fix it! Don't touch it yourself. Bob E.   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Cindy: > The pipe in question needs to be removed from it's rack board while > holding the key to clean out debris that may be above the pallet. > Blow short hard bursts with your mouth across the languid or > mouth opening to the pipe.    
(back) Subject: RE: gracecom locaion s.f. From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 04:36:46 -0800 (PST)   Actually, there is a park across from Grace Cathedral with the mansion behind it. The front doors of the mansion face California Street which runs along the side of Grace Cathedral.   --- Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> wrote: > At 10:10 AM 3/22/2001 -0800, you wrote: > >The Hopkins is a block or two away, but you can get > a damn good view of the > >Cathedral from the top of the Mark!<snip> > > ....best <hick!> damn Bombay Martinis in town! > <hick!> > > >Isn't it the Flood Mansion - the only surviving pre > 06 'quake residence - to > >survive on Nob Hill, that is directly across the > cross-street from the > >cathedral's front doors.<snip> > > Correctamundo. > > dB > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Bach Complete Organ Works From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 09:19:07 -0500   Dear List:   I am doing a bit of research into performances of the complete organ works of J.S. Bach. I'm curious to know if any on the list have given any = thought and formed an opinion as to the best way of performing the complete works = - how they should be grouped, how many recitals in the series and how they should be spaced, whether or not transcriptions should be included, etc. I would be interested to know if any have attended any performances that you would consider successful, or unsuccessful, and why. I am looking for personal opinions about HOW this can or should be done, not IF it should = be done. Also, please try to steer clear of lengthy historical or scholarly data about the complete works, unless there is new information to share.   Thanks a million!! Stephen Williams      
(back) Subject: Re: PROBLEM SOLVED From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 09:33:23 EST   It's all that newfangled technology. Had you just stuck with the electropnematic computer, you'd have been fine. SMG  
(back) Subject: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 09:44:17 EST   The 110-rank Casavant was fine.   It needed cleaning and releathering.   As with many such places, they never bothered to do their research or call =   the right people, simply because they didn't care, and were ignorant. = Were they given options? Were they told that the organ could be restored in stages, over time? That there were firms CURRENTLY involved in at least = two such projects on Casavants of the same vintage?   Isn't it interesting that groups of hobbiests can get together and save a theatre organ, but when a significant church/concert organ of such = integrity and magnitude in a city like Boston is threatened, nothing happens? Did = the local AGO chapter make it known to the National, so it could be reported = in the magazines, and something be done to save it? Isn't Boston the = founding ground of the Organ Historical Society?   This reminds me of an incident last year on ANOTHER organ-related = chatlist, in which an untouched E.M. Skinner of 32 ranks went to the landfill = because they claimed "nobody wanted it." Who the HECK did they call? What effort =   was made? What did all the local organists do? Did they only call the = local "organ techs" or the single "Skinner guru" who made the biggest name for themselves? NOBODY heard about this, and I personally know of several churches which would have paid admirably for it.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck Sickened in New York  
(back) Subject: Re: Jimmy Culp's CD From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 10:12:13 EST   This is a must have CD... Anyone who has been to First Pres., Kilgore = knows that this is one of the finest instruments in the nation and would agree = that Jimmy is a great organist and a gem of a guy!   John  
(back) Subject: St. Jean Baptiste, NYC From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 10:26:52 -0500 (EST)     Sorry to keep sounding like a school marm, folks, but again there has been a sweeping, inaccurate statement about the NYC organ scene.   Mr. LaMirande wrote:   >Another large church, on the East Side of Manhattan, originated as a French church too: St. Jean-Baptiste --- which, for those of you who don't know French, means St. John the Baptist. Nowadays, New Yorkers pronounce it Saint Jeens! (I understand they've allowed the pipe organ to go to rot, and are using an electronic substitute.) =     --Well, actually.... St. Jean's new 100-plus Murray Harris/Wicks/Walker four manual, eight or nine (or ten or eleven!) division pipe organ with digital enhancements has been the talk of New York for months now. It was dedicated with great elan by Todd Wilson a few weeks ago. I have been lucky enough to have had some involvement in music at Saint Jean's, and I love the place, its musicians, clergy, and organ!   If you haven't heard a new Wicks lately, don't rely on "what you understand," but go listen to one! They have come a very long way.   Last September, there was indeed a digital organ in the apse. The glorious acoustics of the church made it sound more than acceptable, and Kyler Brown has done a smashing job building that music ministry into a real jewel in New York's crown. At St. Jean's liturgy is celebrated with dignity and excellence, on the altar and in the choir loft; and the arts are celebrated and welcomed and made part of the fabric of parish life. When I played the Faure Requiem and the Vaughn Williams 5 Mystical Songs there last fall, it was on the Rogers, but the effect was of a pipe organ! We fooled everyone! :-)   The new organ has a dual identity--as it were--being both a Grand Orgue and an orgue de choeur at once. The gallery is on two levels. The upper level stops, in English, comprise a huge four-manual organ. The lower level stops, in French, comprise a smaller four-manual organ; this one is used for choir accompaniment. The apse organ is all digital, and sounds magnificent in the room.   There are those, of course, who will feel the organ is tainted by the presence of digital voices. There are others who will disagree. At the dedication recital, Wilson used the Walker digital high-pressure reeds in the Meistersinger, and the Famous Organist sitting in front of me raised his eyebrows and mouthed to his companion, "..that's DIGITAL??"   This information has been widely, widely circulated in New York since before I arrived in September. All the music programs at Saint Jean's (and New Yorkers divide on the pronunciation!) are always heavily attended and very worthwhile.   Again, I am not trying to be smarter than thou or unpleasant, but it is incredible to me that this kind of misinformation is possible in the first place, especally in a New Yorker; and I have high regard for the people, clergy and staff of St. Jean's and don't need to read that they've let the organ "rot." They haven't. That church has undergone a magnificent restoration and rebuilding, and is one of the most beautiful rooms in the city. Their pastors have been among the brightest the clergy has ever known.       awaiting the inevitable ad hominem response, I remain   Yours,   Jonathan B. Hall, FAGO, et cetera    
(back) Subject: Re: PROBLEM SOLVED From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 09:19:57 -0600   Or the tubular pneumatic computer -- J. C. Penny used to have one here about 50 years ago -- it would take your money and whoosh it upstairs where the price and change were computed ;-)   Tom   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > It's all that newfangled technology. > Had you just stuck with the electropnematic computer, > you'd have been fine. > SMG > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: St. Jean Baptiste, NYC From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 09:37:29 -0600   J:   Bravo! When you take him on on the facts, where's he going to turn? If = he flames you privately, just forward the offending message to David Scribner and the matter will be very nicely -- and finally --taken care of.   I've spent some time with the Wicks renovation of the Kilgen/Moller at = Saint Louis Cathedral and agree with you that their work today is as good as anyone's. The electronic voices there are indistinguishable from the host pipes. As you point out, the "room acoustics" stop is a vital component = in this result.   Cheers,   Peter    
(back) Subject: Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 10:16:33 -0600   Yes, it is sad, Many people, years ago took pride in building the organ, others took pride in paying the bill. They had a grand opening. etc. I suspect that in a bunch of years, people will look back and wonder what in the world was wrong with those in charge to allow this destruction to happen.!! Just an idea, why not the OHS or AGO try to inventory the organs that are still with us, rate them as to historical or other such designation of value. Then issue a plaque to the place that it is installed at, and a recognition in a publication etc. etc. (or something) I don't know, but I think that people will be less likely to get rid of something when the members know that it is recognized nationally, as something of value and not "just old junk". Luther   -----Original Message----- From: TubaMagna@aol.com <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Saturday, March 24, 2001 8:45 AM Subject: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant     >The 110-rank Casavant was fine. > >It needed cleaning and releathering. > >As with many such places, they never bothered to do their research or = call >the right people, simply because they didn't care, and were ignorant. = Were >they given options? Were they told that the organ could be restored in >stages, over time? That there were firms CURRENTLY involved in at least two >such projects on Casavants of the same vintage? > >Isn't it interesting that groups of hobbiests can get together and save a >theatre organ, but when a significant church/concert organ of such integrity >and magnitude in a city like Boston is threatened, nothing happens? Did the >local AGO chapter make it known to the National, so it could be reported = in >the magazines, and something be done to save it? Isn't Boston the = founding >ground of the Organ Historical Society? > >This reminds me of an incident last year on ANOTHER organ-related = chatlist, >in which an untouched E.M. Skinner of 32 ranks went to the landfill = because >they claimed "nobody wanted it." Who the HECK did they call? > >Sebastian Matthaus Gluck >Sickened in New York > >    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Jean Baptiste, NYC From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 08:29:13 -0800 (PST)     --- "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> wrote: > > Sorry to keep sounding like a school marm, folks, but again there has = been > a sweeping, inaccurate statement about the NYC organ scene. <snip>   We all make mistakes, and should appreciate a correction from someone *in = the know!* > This information has been widely, widely circulated in New York since > before I arrived in September. All the music programs at Saint Jean's > (and New Yorkers divide on the pronunciation!) are always heavily = attended > and very worthwhile.   That's GREAT news - giving those with doubts and fear hope! > Again, I am not trying to be smarter than thou or unpleasant, but it is > incredible to me that this kind of misinformation is possible in the = first > place, especally in a New Yorker; and I have high regard for the people, > clergy and staff of St. Jean's and don't need to read that they've let = the > organ "rot." They haven't.   Thanks for setting the record straight regarding the organ and music = program there!! I for one am certainly glad to hear this as I am only aware of the = more visable programs in NYC.   > That church has undergone a magnificent restoration and rebuilding, and = is one > of the most beautiful rooms in the city. Their pastors have been = among the > brightest the clergy has ever known.   Thanks, Jonathan! I am glad to hear the interesting story of the organ. = There are always going to be detractors where large companies that are willing = to do creative things are concerned - I've played many Wicks organs in my time, = and I hated the ones from the 60's and 70's, but by the 80's things seemed to be going better there tonally and mechanically, and the recent ones are more = than acceptable!     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: evolution From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 11:41:30 EST     --part1_a6.11caca4d.27ee283a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I presume that a discussion of evolution is to be considered off-topic for =   this forum. It is astounding to me that it needs to be discussed at all. The = geological and anthropological evidence in support of evolution is so overwhelming, = and so universally accepted by science, that those who persist in denying it simply make themselves look foolish. I suppose they are the same ones who =   think the earth is only 5000 years old, and that the universe is confined = to the solar system! (It's a wonder that they don't claim the sun revolves around the earth!)   When one considers the unimaginable size and scope and age of the = universe, one must stand in awe. If God really created all this, then the majesty = of God expands exponentially. The ultimate significance of the human = species, on the other hand, is diminished. Man --- pardon me, humankind --- is not =   the center of the universe. Just a Johnny-come-lately species on a minor planet in a minor solar system in a minor galaxy. Considering all this, = one would think that humans would be more humble! (Fat chance!)   Humans would not exist at all, had it not been for a chance collision of earth with an asteroid, some 65 million years ago, which wiped out all the =   dominant species of that time. Had it not been for that collision, = dinosaurs would still be roaming the earth, crushing under foot any minor mammalian species they might chance upon. Astronomers believe that such catastrophic collisions occur just about = once every 65 million years. So perhaps we are soon due for another.   As they say: repent, brother! (and sister!) Not that repentance is = going to deflect any determined asteroid!   It says in the Bible: one never knows when the End will come. (Gospel for November 19, 2000.) So be prepared!   I suspect, though, that the Earth itself will continue on, for a few more hundreds of millions of years, doing very nicely without the human species = to mess up its forests, oceans, and atmosphere! Incidentally, the Catholic = --- i.e., universal --- Church is very supportive, nowadays, of science and scientific research. The old fears of the unknown are long in the past.   Sorry to digress from organs. Just that these evolution-denyers really irritate me. Well, to put it on topic: the metals from which organ pipes are made originated in stars, billion of years ago, which exploded (supernovae) and =   from the detritus of which were formed the sun and its planets, including earth. Sort of puts things in perspective, I think.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_a6.11caca4d.27ee283a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I presume that a = discussion of evolution is to be considered off-topic for <BR>this forum. <BR>It is astounding to me that it needs to be discussed at all. &nbsp;The = geological <BR>and anthropological evidence in support of evolution is so = overwhelming, and <BR>so universally accepted by science, that those who persist in denying = it <BR>simply make themselves look foolish. &nbsp;I suppose they are the same = ones who <BR>think the earth is only 5000 years old, and that the universe is = confined to <BR>the solar system! &nbsp;(It's a wonder that they don't claim the sun = revolves <BR>around the earth!) <BR> <BR>When one considers the unimaginable size and scope and age of the = universe, <BR>one must stand in awe. &nbsp;If God really created all this, then the = majesty of <BR>God expands exponentially. &nbsp;The ultimate significance of the = human species, <BR>on the other hand, is diminished. &nbsp;Man --- pardon me, humankind = --- is not <BR>the center of the universe. &nbsp;Just a Johnny-come-lately species on = a minor <BR>planet in a minor solar system in a minor galaxy. &nbsp;Considering = all this, one <BR>would think that humans would be more humble! &nbsp;(Fat chance!) <BR> <BR>Humans would not exist at all, had it not been for a chance collision = of <BR>earth with an asteroid, some 65 million years ago, which wiped out all = the <BR>dominant species of that time. &nbsp;Had it not been for that = collision, dinosaurs <BR>would still be roaming the earth, crushing under foot any minor = mammalian <BR>species they might chance upon. <BR>Astronomers believe that such catastrophic collisions occur just about = once <BR>every 65 million years. &nbsp;So perhaps we are soon due for another. = &nbsp; <BR> <BR>As they say: &nbsp;repent, brother! &nbsp;(and sister!) &nbsp;Not that = repentance is going <BR>to deflect any determined asteroid! <BR> <BR>It says in the Bible: one never knows when the End will come. (Gospel = for <BR>November 19, 2000.) &nbsp;So be prepared! <BR> <BR>I suspect, though, that the Earth itself will continue on, for a few = more <BR>hundreds of millions of years, doing very nicely without the human = species to <BR>mess up its forests, oceans, and atmosphere! &nbsp;Incidentally, the = Catholic --- <BR>i.e., universal --- Church is very supportive, nowadays, of science = and <BR>scientific research. &nbsp;The old fears of the unknown are long in = the past. <BR> <BR>Sorry to digress from organs. &nbsp;Just that these evolution-denyers = really <BR>irritate me. <BR>Well, to put it on topic: the metals from which organ pipes are made <BR>originated in stars, billion of years ago, which exploded (supernovae) = and <BR>from the detritus of which were formed the sun and its planets, = including <BR>earth. &nbsp;Sort of puts things in perspective, I think. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a6.11caca4d.27ee283a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PROBLEM SOLVED From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 11:59:24 EST   To SMG and list:   I'm sure someone would prefer a Sinclaire with tracker linkages. I'm thinking of our emminent Floridian with all the puppies! :)   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 11:04:29 -0600   At 10:16 AM -0600 3/24/01, Luther Melby wrote: >Just an idea, why not the OHS or AGO try to inventory the >organs that are still with us, rate them as to historical or >other such designation of value. >Then issue a plaque to the place that it is installed at, > and a recognition in a publication etc. etc. (or something) >I don't know, but I think that people will be less likely to get >rid of something when the members know that it is recognized >nationally, as something of value and not "just old junk".   Luther   Actually there is a database of many historic organs maintained by the OHS and there is also a historic Organ designation (plaque) that the OHS gives to instruments. Normally, during an OHS Convention several of these presented to churches where convention concerts take place. And there are usually articles about these in "The Tracker", the publication of the OHS.   Unfortunately, at the current time this database of historic instruments is not on-line and the OHS web site - http://www.organsociety.org - doesn't have much mention about this activity but it is a part of the activities of the organization. To help support this work why don't you join the OHS instead of just making suggestions for an organization to so something of this nature? The more members the organization has the more they can do in this important field. Membership information and an on-line membership form on available on the web site listed above.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Indiana et al From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 24 Mar 2001 09:21:35 -0800   On Fri, 23 March 2001, "VEAGUE" wrote:     > If Generals and other officers stayed behind lines, why, oh why did I > have to accompany my C.O. in the field while I was carrying the company > radio? We would have been the first to go! Geezz!! <g>   Because when you're a senior officer, you're told you're too valuable to = lose. When you're a Second Lieutenant, you're told you can't move a = string by pushing it. Both probably true. If I remember correctly, = junior officers have very high casualty rates.   Whether it's leading charges or showing up for Friday Evensong, the young = 'uns got to pay them dues.   Dick      
(back) Subject: Re: Jimmy Culp's CD From: "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 10:57:24 -0800 (PST)   Where can I purchase one of these? --- > This is a must have CD... Anyone who has been to > First Pres., Kilgore knows >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: evolution From: "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:31:27 -0500   Amen & amen to Arthur's post.   Ben Baldus    
(back) Subject: Re: Jimmy Culp's CD From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:20:43 -0600   If I am not mistaken the original posting about this CD was by Bill VanPelt, the Executive Director of the Organ Historical Society and they will be carrying it in their on-line catalogue - http://www.ohscatalog.org - while you are there why don't you also purchase a membership in the organization? <G>   David   >Where can I purchase one of these? >--- >> This is a must have CD... Anyone who has been to > > First Pres., Kilgore knows  
(back) Subject: Re: San Francisco From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 13:21:10 -0800   At 05:39 AM 3/23/2001 -0800, you wrote: >Sadly, it wasn't a private posting. I received it too.<snip>   Even more sadly, we weren't told who the Nobel laureate is, either! Oh well ... maybe it'll show up in Newsweek!   dB