PipeChat Digest #1947 - Saturday, March 24, 2001
 
Hum:  Musical terms
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Musical terms
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Citations of GOOD organs
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Re: Shutter vs Facade
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Free Saville in Seattle area
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Cat lover/New York music
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: evolution
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: PROBLEM SOLVED
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Bach Complete Organ Works
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Dust in Pipes
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: Citations of GOOD organs
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
ad hominem response
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Hum: Musical terms From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 16:39:25 EST     --part1_9d.1303d973.27ee6e0d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > > Musical Terms, by San Francisco. trumpeter Al Molina > > p -- piano --the neighbors have complained > > f -- forte -- the neighbors are out > > ff -- fortissimo -- forget the neighbors > > pp -- pianissimo -- the neighbors and the police are at the door > > Obbligato -- being forced to practice > > Rit/Rall -- coming to the part you haven't practiced > > Con Moto -- yeah baby, I have a car > > Allegro -- It's a little car > > Metronome -- short, urban musician who can fit into a Honda Civic > > Lento -- the days leading up to Easto > > Largo -- beer brewed in Germany or the Florida Keys > > Piu Animato -- clean out the cat's little box or it goes > > Interval -- time to meet the other players at the bar > > Perfect Interval -- when the drinks are on the house > > Cantabile -- singing while drunk > > Con Spirito -- drunk again > > Chords -- things organists play with one finger > > Dischords -- things that organists play with two fingers > > Suspended Chords -- things to lynch the vocalist > > Subdominate -- "I can't play unless I've asked my wife." > > Snycopation -- condition brought on by an overdose of jazz > > Quaver -- the feeling brought on when you haven't practiced > > Key Signatures -- silly things put in music to frighten you (ignore > > and they will go away -- along with your audience) > > Colla Voce -- this shirt is so tight I can't sing > > Professional -- anyone who can't hold down a steady job > > Flats -- English apartments > > A tempo de cafe -- Ah, coffee time! > > Improvisation -- what you do when the music falls down > > Fugue -- clever stuff > > Prelude -- warm--up before the clever stuff > > Acciaccatura/appoggiatura -- insects > > Opus -- exclamation made when the dog "decorates" the new rug [better > instead of dog: cat?] > > Virtuoso -- a person who can work wonders with easy-play music > > Melody -- an ancient now-extinct art in songwriting > > Music -- happiness >       --part1_9d.1303d973.27ee6e0d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR>Musical Terms, by San Francisco. trumpeter Al Molina <BR> <BR>p -- piano --the neighbors have complained <BR> <BR>f -- forte -- the neighbors are out <BR> <BR>ff -- fortissimo -- forget the neighbors <BR> <BR> &nbsp;pp -- pianissimo -- the neighbors and the police are at the = door <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Obbligato -- being forced to practice <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Rit/Rall -- coming to the part you haven't practiced <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Con Moto -- yeah baby, I have a car <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Allegro -- It's a little car <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Metronome -- short, urban musician who can fit into a Honda = Civic <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Lento -- the days leading up to Easto <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Largo -- beer brewed in Germany or the Florida Keys <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Piu Animato -- clean out the cat's little box or it goes <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Interval -- time to meet the other players at the bar <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Perfect Interval -- when the drinks are on the house <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Cantabile -- singing while drunk <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Con Spirito -- drunk again <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Chords -- things organists play with one finger <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Dischords -- things that organists play with two fingers <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Suspended Chords -- things to lynch the vocalist <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Subdominate -- "I can't play unless I've asked my wife." <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Snycopation -- &nbsp;condition brought on by an overdose of = jazz <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Quaver -- the feeling brought on when you haven't practiced <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Key Signatures -- silly things put in music to frighten you (ignore <BR> <BR> &nbsp;and they will go away -- along with your audience) <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Colla Voce -- this shirt is so tight I can't sing <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Professional -- anyone who can't hold down a steady &nbsp;job <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Flats -- English apartments <BR> <BR> &nbsp;A tempo de cafe -- Ah, coffee time! <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Improvisation -- what you do when the music falls down <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Fugue -- clever stuff <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Prelude -- warm--up before the clever stuff <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Acciaccatura/appoggiatura -- insects <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Opus -- exclamation made when the dog "decorates" the new rug = [better <BR> &nbsp;instead of dog: cat?] <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Virtuoso -- a person who can work wonders with easy-play music <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Melody -- an ancient now-extinct art in songwriting <BR> <BR> &nbsp;Music -- happiness <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_9d.1303d973.27ee6e0d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Musical terms From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 16:35:00 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0014_01C0B480.5EA8ACA0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   This is one someone sent me - maybe it's already made the rounds here. = =3D I gave it to my senior warden.   Glenda Sutton   GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING YOUR ORGANIST   Bach Prelude and Fugue: Organist is happy French Toccata: Organist is very happy French Toccata at double speed: Organist went to pub during sermon Improvisation on hymn: Organist has lost glasses Improvisation on popular song: Organist has lost temper Long chord cluster: Organist has gone to sleep Silence: Organist has gone to pub         ------=3D_NextPart_000_0014_01C0B480.5EA8ACA0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>This is one someone sent me - maybe = =3D it's already=3D20 made the rounds here.&nbsp; I gave it to my senior warden.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Glenda Sutton</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING YOUR =3D ORGANIST<BR><BR>Bach=3D20 Prelude and Fugue:&nbsp;Organist is happy<BR>French =3D Toccata:&nbsp;&nbsp;Organist=3D20 is very happy<BR>French Toccata at double speed:&nbsp;&nbsp;Organist =3D went to pub=3D20 during sermon<BR>Improvisation on hymn:&nbsp;Organist has lost=3D20 glasses<BR>Improvisation on popular song:&nbsp;&nbsp;Organist has = lost=3D20 temper<BR>Long chord cluster:&nbsp;&nbsp;Organist has gone to=3D20 sleep<BR>Silence:&nbsp;&nbsp;Organist has gone to=3D20 pub<BR><BR><BR></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0014_01C0B480.5EA8ACA0--    
(back) Subject: Citations of GOOD organs From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 17:32:34 EST   Hey All, After hearing the discouraging news of the fate of the Casavant at =   Tremont Temple and the threads of plaques and what not on hsitoric organs, =   I've got a thought! The OHS designates organs historic and gives the owners/congregations of the organs pride and an idea of what a treasure = they have. Why doesn't the AGO do the same thing, or even the APBOA do such a thing with new instruments and large instruments of note. I have seen some =   incredible organs go in in my day, and they are only a year or two, or in = the case of the new Fritts in Princeton, months old. Some churches have organs =   built during the 70s and 80s that have great significance, why wait till = they are old to publicaly acknowledge them!? Organs of great design, great = sound, and great value should be recognized now. The congregation needs to know = more than just the fact that they spent money and got a big organ. Lets make a list! Lets note our treasured organs and start a web site or some kind of yearly magazine highlighting these organs. I know very little or organ building in the 80s and 70s. I didn't join the AGO until 92'! = Congregations fall into routine, organs become just another part of a church, people get =   bored and strive for something enlightening and new. Maybe we need to give = it to them!?   -Pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: Re: Shutter vs Facade From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:32:49 -0800   At 06:15 PM 3/23/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Horizontal shutters block more sound than verticle shutters, especially if >they dont open fully<snip>   I don't think so. What I think the writer is referring to is the old=20 horizontal Hope-Jones shades, which indeed were sound impediments even when= =20 open, which, in normal conditions, was on at a 45=B0 angle to closed=20 position. However, the directional axis of the shades has no effect on=20 attenuation, BUT does have a significant impact on "lens effect", as does=20 the physical size of the shade surface. More later when I get around to it.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Free Saville in Seattle area From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:34:05 -0800   At 05:14 PM 3/23/2001 -0500, you wrote: >A non-working Saville organ is available without cost in the Seattle = area. >Must be removed within the next 12 days. Please email me personally for >details.<snip>   Details are herewith requested.   Bob Scarborough    
(back) Subject: Re: Cat lover/New York music From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:35:22 -0800   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_13339295= =3D=3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   At 08:07 PM 3/23/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Would somebody PLEASE tell me what people are talking about with regard = to >RUDE remarks about SF? <snip>   ....and people wonder why the National Enquirer and The Globe sell so = well!   dB --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_13339295= =3D=3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> At 08:07 PM 3/23/2001 -0500, you wrote:<br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><font face=3D"Times New Roman, = Times" color=3D"#800040"><b>Would somebody PLEASE tell me what people are talking about with regard to <br> RUDE remarks about SF? &lt;snip&gt;</b></font></blockquote><br> ....and people wonder why the National Enquirer and The Globe sell so well!<br> <br> dB</html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_13339295= =3D=3D_.ALT--    
(back) Subject: Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:43:14 -0800   At 09:44 AM 3/24/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Isn't it interesting that groups of hobbiests can get together and save a >theatre organ, but when a significant church/concert organ of such = integrity >and magnitude in a city like Boston is threatened, nothing happens?<snip>   'Tis simple:   1.) Organists don't like to get their hands dirty, 2.) Saving/moving/installing such instruments takes mechanical and electrical skill, which organists usually possess none of, 3.) Organists always think someone ELSE will do the dirty work, thus allowing them simply to PLAY the finished result when it's done, and 4.) Most TO fans aren't organists!   ;-)   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: evolution From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:57:06 -0800 (PST)   Man, in whatever form he was at the time, existed before the ice age. Evolution is part of God's creation.   --- ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > I presume that a discussion of evolution is to be > considered off-topic for > this forum. > It is astounding to me that it needs to be discussed > at all. The geological > and anthropological evidence in support of evolution > is so overwhelming, and > so universally accepted by science, that those who > persist in denying it > simply make themselves look foolish. I suppose they > are the same ones who > think the earth is only 5000 years old, and that the > universe is confined to > the solar system! (It's a wonder that they don't > claim the sun revolves > around the earth!) > > When one considers the unimaginable size and scope > and age of the universe, > one must stand in awe. If God really created all > this, then the majesty of > God expands exponentially. The ultimate > significance of the human species, > on the other hand, is diminished. Man --- pardon > me, humankind --- is not > the center of the universe. Just a > Johnny-come-lately species on a minor > planet in a minor solar system in a minor galaxy. > Considering all this, one > would think that humans would be more humble! (Fat > chance!) > > Humans would not exist at all, had it not been for a > chance collision of > earth with an asteroid, some 65 million years ago, > which wiped out all the > dominant species of that time. Had it not been for > that collision, dinosaurs > would still be roaming the earth, crushing under > foot any minor mammalian > species they might chance upon. > Astronomers believe that such catastrophic > collisions occur just about once > every 65 million years. So perhaps we are soon due > for another. > > As they say: repent, brother! (and sister!) Not > that repentance is going > to deflect any determined asteroid! > > It says in the Bible: one never knows when the End > will come. (Gospel for > November 19, 2000.) So be prepared! > > I suspect, though, that the Earth itself will > continue on, for a few more > hundreds of millions of years, doing very nicely > without the human species to > mess up its forests, oceans, and atmosphere! > Incidentally, the Catholic --- > i.e., universal --- Church is very supportive, > nowadays, of science and > scientific research. The old fears of the unknown > are long in the past. > > Sorry to digress from organs. Just that these > evolution-denyers really > irritate me. > Well, to put it on topic: the metals from which > organ pipes are made > originated in stars, billion of years ago, which > exploded (supernovae) and > from the detritus of which were formed the sun and > its planets, including > earth. Sort of puts things in perspective, I think. > > Arthur LaMirande >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: PROBLEM SOLVED From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 15:56:36 -0800   At 09:19 AM 3/24/2001 -0600, you wrote: >Or the tubular pneumatic computer -- J. C. Penny used to have one here >about 50 years ago -- it would take your money and whoosh it upstairs >where the price and change were computed ;-)<snipo>   A system of J.C.'s own design. Many oldsters will also remember when Penney's stores from the earliest days had "clotheslines" running from = each clerk's location to the "front office" up above. Money and statement were =   attached in a small carrier to a clothespin like affair, and it was = whisked through the air of the store to the cashier in the office space in a mezzanine. The Riverside, CA Penney's store, complete with 1904 tin ceilings, had this arrangement until leaving downtown in the mid 1960s.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Complete Organ Works From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 19:24:23 EST     --part1_c6.13211de3.27ee94b7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   My preference would be to group the pieces so that they keys and form complement each other. Another consideration is registration. It is imperative that all forms to do not sound alike. I would try to find pieces from different periods that show how Bach matured, or reused a form = in a different way.   Another option would be to separate some of the prelude/toccatas// = fantasias from their fugues, or possibly trio movements and placing them in other = parts of the program. F'rinstance:   Trio sonata - movement 1 Chorale prelude (ornamented melodic type) Prelude/toccata/fantasia Trio sonata - movement 2 Chorale prelude (trio super) Fugue (from P/t/f) Trio sonata - movement 3   I can't offer any specifics right now, but I sort of like the idea (just born!), and will experiment with it next week.   The main thing I would suggest is to vary registration. I have heard some =   recordings of complete works in which each form has similar registration = -- Prelude and Fugue played on full principal chorus; Fantasy and Fugue on = full organ; Toccata and Fugue on full organ, dropping the reeds for most of = the fugue, but piling them on again for the conclusion.   I do recall hearing a recital of the 17 Leipzig Chorale Preludes by = Bernard Lagace on the Beckerath organ at Immaculate Conception in Montreal (OHS = 99). I went to the program because I wanted to hear the organ, and with the = idea that I would be bored out of my mind through 17 chorale preludes, I took a =   book to read. The organ was so beautiful and the playing/registration = so excuisite that I was held in rapt attention through the program. So I think the most important consideration in your program, regardless of the selections you choose to present, is registration.       Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_c6.13211de3.27ee94b7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>My preference would be = to group the pieces so that they keys and form <BR>complement each other. &nbsp;Another consideration is registration. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It is <BR>imperative that all forms to do not sound alike. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I = would try to find <BR>pieces from different periods that show how Bach matured, or reused a = form in <BR>a different way. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Another option would be to separate some of the prelude/toccatas// = fantasias <BR>from their fugues, or possibly trio movements and placing them in = other parts <BR>of the program. &nbsp;&nbsp;F'rinstance: <BR> <BR>Trio sonata &nbsp;- &nbsp;movement 1 <BR>Chorale prelude (ornamented melodic type) <BR>Prelude/toccata/fantasia <BR>Trio sonata - &nbsp;movement 2 <BR>Chorale prelude (trio super) <BR>Fugue (from P/t/f) <BR>Trio sonata - movement 3 <BR> <BR>I can't offer any specifics right now, but I sort of like the idea = (just <BR>born!), and will experiment with it next week. <BR> <BR>The main thing I would suggest is to vary registration. &nbsp;I have = heard some <BR>recordings of complete works in which each form has similar = registration -- <BR>Prelude and Fugue played on full principal chorus; &nbsp;Fantasy and = Fugue on full <BR>organ; &nbsp;Toccata and Fugue on full organ, dropping the reeds for = most of the <BR>fugue, but piling them on again &nbsp;for the conclusion. <BR> <BR>I do recall hearing a recital of &nbsp;the 17 Leipzig Chorale Preludes = by Bernard <BR>Lagace on the Beckerath organ at Immaculate Conception in Montreal = (OHS 99). &nbsp; <BR>&nbsp;I went to the program because I wanted to hear the organ, and = with the idea <BR>that I would be bored out of my mind through 17 chorale preludes, I = took a <BR>book to read. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The organ was so beautiful and the playing/registration so <BR>excuisite that I was held in rapt attention through the program. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;So I <BR>think the most important consideration in your program, regardless of = the <BR>selections you choose to present, is registration. <BR> <BR> &nbsp; <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_c6.13211de3.27ee94b7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Dust in Pipes From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 19:26:55 -0500   To the List:   Dust in pipes is an incredible problem. I owned a 15 rank residence organ for about ten years. The Blower was located in a small area near my garage. Even although I was careful not to "kick up dust", small particles of everything would get caught up in the small pipes and put them severely out of tune. I would have to pull the dust out of the mouth of the pipe with a pair of tweezers. I even found a moth in the boot of the reed pipe (Oboe 8") which somehow had made its way from the blower room, through the 50' of wind tubing to the reservoir and into the wind chests, to finally find its way into the boot of an Oboe 8' rank, only to occasionally clog up the reed while it was playing. By this time the moth was probably dead and the air current through the pipe boot would create enough turbulence to move the moth into the reed and affect its speech. It took a while to find that one !!! Most of the problems were with dust getting caught between the languid and the mouth of the small pipes. The reduced air flow would drop the pitch enough to be noticed. I can't imagine the problems you would have with a big organ with lots of mixtures. Fun times with real pipe organs !!!! Does anyone else have a good story to tell ?   Antoni Scott  
(back) Subject: Re: Citations of GOOD organs From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 19:43:40 EST     --part1_104.c0c330.27ee993c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/24/01 10:44:28 PM !!!First Boot!!!, Oboe32@aol.com writes:     > After hearing the discouraging news of the fate of the Casavant at > Tremont Temple and the threads of plaques and what not on hsitoric = organs, > I've got a thought! The OHS designates organs historic and gives the > owners/congregations of the organs pride and an idea of what a treasure = they > have. Why doesn't the AGO do the same thing, or even the APBOA do such a > thing with new instruments and large instruments of note.   This has been done to a significant extent by several AGO chapters. New York City leaps to mind, and I've seen a goodly number of others in my surfing travels. It would be good to include as many pipe organs as possible, large and small, in these websites. Some sites even have photographs of the instruments and their buildings.   What would help this movement would be to have each institution notified = when their instrument is placed on a site. Additionally, if the site could = have a click-on e-mail for visitors to send comments directly to the church = saying that they had seen the organ on a webpage and wanted to let the church = know how much they liked it. This would give the churches some idea of the importance of their instrument and hopefully more incentive to not only = take care of it, but share it as well.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_104.c0c330.27ee993c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/24/01 10:44:28 PM !!!First Boot!!!, Oboe32@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">After hearing the = discouraging news of the fate of the Casavant at <BR>Tremont Temple and the threads of plaques and what not on hsitoric = organs, <BR>I've got a thought! The OHS designates organs historic and gives the <BR>owners/congregations of the organs pride and an idea of what a = treasure they <BR>have. Why doesn't the AGO do the same thing, or even the APBOA do such = a <BR>thing with new instruments and large instruments of note. </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>This has been done to a significant extent by several AGO chapters. = &nbsp;&nbsp;New <BR>York City leaps to mind, and I've seen a goodly number of others in my =   <BR>surfing travels. &nbsp;It would be good to include as many pipe organs = as <BR>possible, large and small, in these websites. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Some = sites even have <BR>photographs of the instruments and their buildings. <BR> <BR>What would help this movement would be to have each institution = notified when <BR>their instrument is placed on a site. &nbsp;&nbsp;Additionally, if the = site could have <BR>a click-on e-mail for visitors to send comments directly to the church = saying <BR>that they had seen the organ on a webpage and wanted to let the church = know <BR>how much they liked it. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This would give the churches = some idea of the <BR>importance of their instrument and hopefully more incentive to not = only take <BR>care of it, but share it as well. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_104.c0c330.27ee993c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: ad hominem response From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Mar 2001 19:44:19 EST     --part1_22.13b9d066.27ee9963_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I stand corrected, with regard to St. Jean Baptiste.   That's what I get, for not paying attention to the organ scene in New York =   City --- and always going out of town, if I want to listen to the organ!   Sorry, Messrs. Hall and Storandt, if this is not quite the response you expected. (And I thought Mr. Storandt was a friend. I stand corrected on that = issue, as well!)   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_22.13b9d066.27ee9963_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I stand corrected, with = regard to St. Jean Baptiste. <BR> <BR>That's what I get, for not paying attention to the organ scene in New = York <BR>City --- and always going out of town, if I want to listen to the = organ! <BR> <BR>Sorry, Messrs. Hall and Storandt, if this is not quite the response = you <BR>expected. <BR>(And I thought Mr. Storandt was a friend. &nbsp;I stand corrected on = that issue, <BR>as well!) <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_22.13b9d066.27ee9963_boundary--