PipeChat Digest #1950 - Sunday, March 25, 2001
 
Dust in pipes...and other critters
  by <Doppelflote8@aol.com>
Tremont Temple
  by <Doppelflote8@aol.com>
plain
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: PROBLEM SOLVED
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: ad hominem response
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Peter Conte at Yale, new book on 20th cent. organ performace
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: PROBLEM SOLVED
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Dust in pipes...and other critters
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Dust in Pipes
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
St. Jean-Baptiste/St. Vincent Ferrer
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Dust in pipes...and other critters
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
To those "that have had it"
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net>
Westminster chines, etc.
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Westminster chines, etc.
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
 

(back) Subject: Dust in pipes...and other critters From: <Doppelflote8@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 06:59:26 EST     --part1_27.12e21116.27ef379e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings......   THe recent posting brought to mind a rather unpleasent experience this = past fall. While tuning the 16' Trombone (ped) in an Andover instrument in = Milton MA, CCC# refused to speak. A rather unfortunate bat had perished in the shallot.   Oh the things we find!   Regards, Alan   --part1_27.12e21116.27ef379e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial Black" = LANG=3D"0">Greetings...... <BR> <BR>THe recent posting brought to mind a rather unpleasent experience this = past <BR>fall. &nbsp;While tuning the 16' Trombone (ped) in an Andover = instrument in Milton <BR>MA, CCC# refused to speak. &nbsp;A rather unfortunate bat had perished = in the <BR>shallot. <BR> <BR>Oh the things we find! <BR> <BR>Regards, <BR>Alan</FONT></HTML>   --part1_27.12e21116.27ef379e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Tremont Temple From: <Doppelflote8@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 07:02:54 EST     --part1_ea.133aed08.27ef386e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     Hi Again.....   Dont forget that Trement Temple lost a couple of great Hook/Hastings = organs in separate fires.   Alan   --part1_ea.133aed08.27ef386e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial Black" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Hi Again..... <BR> <BR>Dont forget that Trement Temple lost a couple of great Hook/Hastings = organs <BR>in separate fires. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Alan</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ea.133aed08.27ef386e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: plain From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 07:36:19 EST     --part1_9d.130cd4f8.27ef4043_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   To Bob Scarborough:   I LIKE plain yogurt!   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_9d.130cd4f8.27ef4043_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>To Bob Scarborough: <BR> <BR>I LIKE plain yogurt! <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9d.130cd4f8.27ef4043_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PROBLEM SOLVED From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 20:44:11 +0800   Yes, Thomas but, there was also the tracker computer. A long wire across the store to the cashier. Pull a cord and whoosh! it flew the cash across the store where the price and change were computed and sent back by the same method! Time has marched on but we have progressed beyond the tracker and the tubular pneumatic computers!!!! Is there a comparison here? Now I will duck under the counter to avoid flying missiles!!! Bob Elms (who loves his el.pn. organ with extensions and all!) "Thomas H. Cotner" wrote: > > Or the tubular pneumatic computer -- J. C. Penny used to have one here > about 50 years ago -- it would take your money and whoosh it upstairs > where the price and change were computed ;-) > Tom    
(back) Subject: Re: ad hominem response From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 04:59:46 -0800 (PST)   All my friends are welcome to disagree with me on anything. This leads to wonderul, interesting and good natured discussion. Dear Arthur, you might try the same. You take things way too personally.   --- ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > I stand corrected, with regard to St. Jean Baptiste. > > That's what I get, for not paying attention to the > organ scene in New York > City --- and always going out of town, if I want to > listen to the organ! > > Sorry, Messrs. Hall and Storandt, if this is not > quite the response you > expected. > (And I thought Mr. Storandt was a friend. I stand > corrected on that issue, > as well!) > > Arthur LaMirande >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Peter Conte at Yale, new book on 20th cent. organ performace From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 05:11:18 -0800 (PST)   I'm amazed why people think the performance of organ transcriptions is "long dormant". Alexander Frey played the largest transcription of all-Mahler's Fifth Symphony-at Grace Cathedral. In fact, Frey said that he was playing transcriptions as a teenager in the late 80's and never stopped. Virgil Fox played transcriptions until his death, and Keith Chapman was performing likewise up until his passing. Other symphonic organists never stopped either.   I have seen a draft of John Hunter's book on organ performance in the 20th century--due to be published next year or the year after. An organist and musicologist from the UK, he has spent a huge amount of time in the USA and devoted a large amount of research to organ performance in North America. He writes that Biggs and Fox were the most important influences in bringing the organ into the household. Of transcription performers, he writes that Frey and Thomas Murray were the ones responsible for the explosion of transcription performances because they always included such on every program, are true symphonic players, and that Frey's playing of Mahler symphonies set a trend. --- Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> wrote: > At 08:17 PM 3/24/2001 -0500, you wrote: > >Peter Conte will perform on the Newberry Organ in > Woolsey Hall at Yale > >University tomorrow (Sunday), March 25 at 8pm. $5 > donation at the door.<snip> > > Anyone who hasn't had the opportunity to hear Peter > Conte display his > talent for the long-dormant art of organ > transcription should do so as soon > as possible, preferably on an organ of sufficient > resources. All repertory > preferences aside, I think what he does may be the > salvation of the organ > in public venue performance...if we could just lay > OFF the "retro-fad" > silliness in these places! Seattle residents will > never get the chance to > hear him in "Boss-Nova" Hall, I'm quite sure! > > DeserTBoB > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: PROBLEM SOLVED From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 21:21:36 +0800   The pneumatic system in "JC's store" may have been to his design but the same kind of system was used in Boan's stores in Western Australia back in the 1920s and 30s. So it is not unique by any means. The wire system was also used in a store in my city here (aso Boans) as late as 1975. Bob Elms.     > A system of J.C.'s own design. Many oldsters will also remember when > Penney's stores from the earliest days had "clotheslines" running from = each clerk's location to the "front office" up above. Money and = statement were attached in a small carrier to a clothespin like affair, = and it was whisked through the air of the store to the cashier in the = office space in a > mezzanine.    
(back) Subject: Re: Dust in pipes...and other critters From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 08:40:10 -0500   Re: Bats in the pedal Trombone.   While doing the Reuter, I had three bird skeletons in the pedal Gedeckt. I saved them for a friend to decorate for Halloween.   Rick            
(back) Subject: Re: Dust in Pipes From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 09:16:50 EST   In a message dated 3/24/01 7:26:48 PM Eastern Standard Time, = ascott@epix.net writes:   << Most of the problems were with dust getting caught between the languid and the mouth of the small pipes. >>   This sounds like a furnace dust problem. What kind of heat do you have? I also see this problem in churches that burn lots of incense. I'm sure that = it is incense dust because when I have taken pipes like this to the shop I = can smell the incense when I walk in the door the next morning.   Cheers:   Alan B  
(back) Subject: St. Jean-Baptiste/St. Vincent Ferrer From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 09:24:55 EST     --part1_6a.c6e2c3b.27ef59b7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I'm old enough to remember when the Upper East Side of Manhattan was an ordinary middle-class neighborhood --- actually, working-class further = north in Yorkville (Jimmy Cagney's old neighborhood) --- and the largest edifice = in the vicinity was the Rupert Brewery! Back in the 1930s, there was a = series of movies made, on the theme of the (tough) East Side Kids. The = Queensboro bridge was often seen as a backdrop; and usually some rich kid from Park Avenue who wandered too far afield got beat up!   Times have changed.   Well, it's been about 35 years since I last went up into the organ loft of =   St. Jean-Baptiste Church at 76th Street and Lexington Avenue. In those far-off days, I would occasionally substitute for the organist --- who was =   then a gentleman from Quebec named Gerard Caron (who, previously, had = worked for the New York office of the Quebec Tourist Board).   In those days, they had Perpetual Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament in = that church --- meaning that the organ could not be played, except for actual services. The organist had to do his practicing (such as he actually may have done, which probably wasn't much!) on an electronic in the choir = room. The organ was a relic from the 20s or early 30s: it may have been a = Moller, but I don't recall for certain. It was situated high up in the second = organ gallery --- the first evidently going unused. There was another small (nondescript) pipe organ in the lower chapel.   Mr. Caron said it was a "full-time" job, inasmuch as he had to be there = all day to play for their numerous novenas. (For the uninitiated, or those = born after 1964: a novena is a service consisting of hymns to the Virgin Mary = and recitations of the Rosary, usually followed by the service of Benediction = --- in which the Blessed Sacrament, inside a monstrance, is held up for Adoration.)   It was customary to sing soupy, syrupy Victorian hymns like "Mother Dear" = and "Mary Pray for Us" at a painfully lugubrious tempo. One time, when I attempted to play one of these hymns at the tempo actually indicated by = the printed score, the priest stopped the service and roared: "Will the = organist please play the hymn so that the people can sing it!" The only good = music was for the Benediction service: the Tantum Ergo (to the tune of Wade) = and the Holy God, We Praise Thy Name (to the 1774 tune from Vienna).   The years went by; I went to another church of my own (on the Upper West Side), and Mr. Caron eventually left the scene. I had no reason to go = back to St. Jean-Baptiste, but was told by others that the organ was allowed to =   deteriorate, and in the end an electronic was introduced for use in the services.   A representative of a major organ company told me, just a few years ago, = that he had had an interview with the pastor of St. Jean-Baptiste, presumably = for the purpose of either restoring the old organ or replacing it with a new = one; and that said pastor had opined that he "hated" that "other" organ up the =   street in that "other" church on Park Avenue. So, if they have actually = gone ahead and installed a new instrument, they must have had a change either = of heart or of pastor! I wouldn't know: I rarely have reason to go to the = East Side these days. (Although there is an express bus from there directly to = my door --- the # 98 --- weekdays, rush hours only!)   Another church a few blocks down the street is St. Vincent Ferrer --- a = very fine example of French Gothic architecture. There, the old Kilgen organ = lay silent for decades, and an inconsequential electronic up front was used = for services. (They did, though, maintain a paid quartet of operatic = soloists.) In 1980, I gave a recital at my Upper West Side church (Holy Name of = Jesus) with two operatic singers, one of whom happened to be the regular soprano soloist at St. Vincent Ferrer at that time. The organist of St. Vincent Ferrer attended. He was surprised (amazed might be the word!) that there "is so much up there" (referring to the 1938 Whitelegg-Moller at Holy Name of Jesus). This organ was then in the = process of piece-by-piece restoration by a firm in Bayonne, New Jersey, and the organist of St. Vincent Ferrer had a lengthy conversation with the head of =   that firm. Next thing we know: Bayonne has the contract to restore the organ at St. Vincent Ferrer! (I thought I should have received a = commission, for having arranged the introduction; but alas, that didn't happen.) I'm told that Bayonne put its nameplate on the St. Vincent Ferrer organ afterwards; but since I was never invited to visit there, I couldn't say = with certainty. The organist in question has since died.   Arthur LaMirande       --part1_6a.c6e2c3b.27ef59b7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I'm old enough to = remember when the Upper East Side of Manhattan was an <BR>ordinary middle-class neighborhood --- actually, working-class further = north <BR>in Yorkville (Jimmy Cagney's old neighborhood) --- and the largest = edifice in <BR>the vicinity was the Rupert Brewery! &nbsp;Back in the 1930s, there = was a series <BR>of movies made, on the theme of the (tough) East Side Kids. &nbsp;The = Queensboro <BR>bridge was often seen as a backdrop; and usually some rich kid from = Park <BR>Avenue who wandered too far afield got beat up! <BR> <BR>Times have changed. <BR> <BR>Well, it's been about 35 years since I last went up into the organ = loft of <BR>St. Jean-Baptiste Church at 76th Street and Lexington Avenue. &nbsp;In = those <BR>far-off days, I would occasionally substitute for the organist --- who = was <BR>then a gentleman from Quebec named Gerard Caron (who, previously, had = worked <BR>for the New York office of the Quebec Tourist Board). <BR> <BR>In those days, they had Perpetual Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament = in that <BR>church --- meaning that the organ could not be played, except for = actual <BR>services. &nbsp;The organist had to do his practicing (such as he = actually may <BR>have done, which probably wasn't much!) on an electronic in the choir = room. &nbsp; <BR>The organ was a relic from the 20s or early 30s: it may have been a = Moller, <BR>but I don't recall for certain. &nbsp;It was situated high up in the = second organ <BR>gallery --- the first evidently going unused. &nbsp;There was another = small <BR>(nondescript) pipe organ in the lower chapel. <BR> <BR>Mr. Caron said it was a "full-time" job, inasmuch as he had to be = there all <BR>day to play for their numerous novenas. &nbsp;(For the uninitiated, or = those born <BR>after 1964: a novena is a service consisting of hymns to the Virgin = Mary and <BR>recitations of the Rosary, usually followed by the service of = Benediction --- <BR>in which the Blessed Sacrament, inside a monstrance, is held up for <BR>Adoration.) <BR> <BR>It was customary to sing soupy, syrupy Victorian hymns like "Mother = Dear" and <BR>"Mary Pray for Us" at a painfully lugubrious tempo. &nbsp;One time, = when I <BR>attempted to play one of these hymns at the tempo actually indicated = by the <BR>printed score, the priest stopped the service and roared: "Will the = organist <BR>please play the hymn so that the people can sing it!" &nbsp;&nbsp;The = only good music <BR>was for the Benediction service: &nbsp;the Tantum Ergo (to the tune of = Wade) and <BR>the Holy God, We Praise Thy Name (to the 1774 tune from Vienna). <BR> <BR>The years went by; I went to another church of my own (on the Upper = West <BR>Side), and Mr. Caron eventually left the scene. &nbsp;I had no reason = to go back <BR>to St. Jean-Baptiste, but was told by others that the organ was = allowed to <BR>deteriorate, and in the end an electronic was introduced for use in = the <BR>services. <BR> <BR>A representative of a major organ company told me, just a few years = ago, that <BR>he had had an interview with the pastor of St. Jean-Baptiste, presumably for <BR>the purpose of either restoring the old organ or replacing it with a = new one; <BR>&nbsp;and that said pastor had opined that he "hated" that "other" = organ up the <BR>street in that "other" church on Park Avenue. &nbsp;So, if they have = actually gone <BR>ahead and installed a new instrument, they must have had a change = either of <BR>heart or of pastor! &nbsp;I wouldn't know: I rarely have reason to go = to the East <BR>Side these days. &nbsp;(Although there is an express bus from there = directly to my <BR>door --- the # 98 --- weekdays, rush hours only!) <BR> <BR>Another church a few blocks down the street is St. Vincent Ferrer --- = a very <BR>fine example of French Gothic architecture. &nbsp;There, the old = Kilgen organ lay <BR>silent for decades, and an inconsequential electronic up front was = used for <BR>services. &nbsp;(They did, though, maintain a paid quartet of operatic = soloists.) &nbsp; <BR>In 1980, I gave a recital at my Upper West Side church (Holy Name of = Jesus) <BR>with two operatic singers, one of whom happened to be the regular = soprano <BR>soloist at St. Vincent Ferrer at that time. <BR>The organist of St. Vincent Ferrer attended. &nbsp;He was surprised = (amazed might <BR>be the word!) that there "is so much up there" (referring to the 1938 <BR>Whitelegg-Moller at Holy Name of Jesus). &nbsp;This organ was then in = the process <BR>of piece-by-piece restoration by a firm in Bayonne, New Jersey, and = the <BR>organist of St. Vincent Ferrer had a lengthy conversation with the = head of <BR>that firm. &nbsp;Next thing we know: &nbsp;Bayonne has the contract to = restore the <BR>organ at St. Vincent Ferrer! &nbsp;(I thought I should have received a = commission, <BR>for having arranged the introduction; but alas, that didn't happen.) = &nbsp;I'm <BR>told that Bayonne put its nameplate on the St. Vincent Ferrer organ <BR>afterwards; but since I was never invited to visit there, I couldn't = say with <BR>certainty. &nbsp;The organist in question has since died. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_6a.c6e2c3b.27ef59b7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Loss of Tremont Baptist Boston Casavant From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 06:50:42 -0800   Actually, I'm surprised that the Macungie clan didn't try to sell the Tremont Temple job as a combo organ ... they're getting REAL nervous that the Hillsboro Hellions are still selling rings and circles around them in that dept.   Another note along that line: it appears that the Reuter/Allen = cohabitation has been consummated ... our dealer's stationery now has Reuter's name on it.   Cheers,   Bud, who doesn't have to go early to practice this morning because he's playing the PIANO (grin) ... new organ comes NEXT week   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 09:22 PM 3/24/2001 -0800, you wrote: > >I do think that it is their duty to preserve pipe organs as much as > >possible.<snip> > > ...and if elephants could fly... > > I'm sure THAT statement would give titters of laughter to the Markowitz > clan for days on end! > > dB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Dust in pipes...and other critters From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 08:46:50 -0600   VEAGUE wrote:   > Re: Bats in the pedal Trombone. > > While doing the Reuter, I had three bird skeletons in the pedal Gedeckt. > I saved them for a friend to decorate for Halloween. >   We had a service call from a church this week who had some out of tune = notes on the 2' and Mixture and said it sounded as if a bird or bat had got into the organ. When I went to investigate and retune it yesterday the first thing I found on going inside the organ was a dead starling lying on the treble C# end of the Mixture toeboard. Q.E.D.   Once some years ago when I was working in Pennsylvania I was investigating why a Trombone note wasn't working, and held it up to see what was obstructing it. The dead bat dropped right into my mouth, which happened = to be open at the time. Yuck! That isn't the kind of mistake one makes = twice ....   John Speller    
(back) Subject: To those "that have had it" From: "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 10:21:44 -0500   Hello all, I just joind the group and was reading the archives and wanted to share this common experience I had, and hope some people take what I have to say seriously!   I can share your experiences and so can so many others.... but what you do about it means more about your character than anything.   I was in a MS Lutheran church in Germantown MD. Beautiful 24 stop - 35 Rank Flentrop in a 4 second room. They hired a new preacher (no.... not pastor) who on the first day stopped me in the middle of the 1st hymn after waving his arms all over the place trying to direct the congregation from down in the front... and wanted me to liven this hymn up. (I saw this in the mirror, but totally ignored him.) I will tell you without a doubt, as hymn playing goes , free form hymn improvisation (not the crap you see in books either), and understanding tempo and cadence in hymnody, I would put myself in the top 5%.   After being stopped dead in my tracks I continued the hymn at the appropriate tempo for congregational singing. At that point he wanted to meet with me before each service to "go over each hymn". He came in on the 1st Sunday of Advent and my resignation was out there 10 days later Christmas Eve was my last service!   You know, congregations really don't give a shit! I was persona non-grata after my blowup with this jerk. I told him in front of the congregation in the narthex (after he cornered me) that my job was to lead the congregation in hymn singing and that was exactly what I was going to do!.... he stormed off. Let me tell you that life is too short to put up with ass holes like this. Pardon the off-color remarks, but sometimes the punctuation really helps get the severity of the situation across.   This, by the way, was a complete change in a congregation which, within the prior year, was telling me that "the walls of this church have never heard music like this". I was brought into a meeting with the Board of Elders and the pastor to hopefully "patch things up". I was told that they had hired the pastor, and he was the leader of the congregation and my boss, and therefore I had to do exactly what he wanted if I wanted to keep my job.   If we don't stand up for what we believe, then we're no better than the stupid pathetic blind sheep sitting in the pews. They are the ones who are totally gutless and have no one to blame for their problems but themselves!   Anyone who loves music (whatever your tradition) and is forced to go against whatever precepts that you know are in keeping with your congregation, then you're nothing more than a whore playing for money! To Quote a good frined, Thomas Spacht... about organists and many of the problems that we endure (or put up with), or create on our own... "We have met the emeny and it is us!"   Wayne Grauel Former Director of Music at a church in Germantown, Maryland   I now volunteer my services for a small Lutheran Church. I have always said, that I would rather give my talent to a congregation that has no resources and totally appreciates me rather than get screwed by a congregation that is well off yet doesn't want to pay an organist what they're worth!          
(back) Subject: Westminster chines, etc. From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 25 Mar 2001 07:41:40 -0800   On the quarter hour: F#, E, D, A   On the half hour: D, F#, E, A -- D, E, F#, D   3/4: F#, D, E, A -- A, E, F#, D -- F#, E, D, A   On the hour: D, F#, E, A -- D, E, F#, D -- F#, D, E, A -- A, E, F#, D -- = followed by the appropriate number of Big Bongs, which, I believe, are the = only notes actually produced by Big Ben, himself, who is the Biggest Bell, = not the clock and not the tower.   Now I have some questions:   1. What happened to the Fritts in Princeton (which is where I live, by = the way)? Should I have felt a disturbance in The Force?   2. What happened to Diane Bish, and who is she, anyway?   3. Who is the #1 Toaster Company?   Since everybody else seems to know, it might be best to respond privately.   Thanks, Dick      
(back) Subject: Re: Westminster chines, etc. From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 12:53:16 -0500   Dick...........who is Diane Bish you ask? Oh boy, that would take too long to answer. Let's simply say that she's an organ virtuoso, and = host/executive producer of a TV show called "The Joy Of Music". As for you asking what happened to her.......what do you mean by that? As far as I know, nothing has happened to her recently. The last time I spoke with her, she was = fine.   Carlo