PipeChat Digest #1954 - Monday, March 26, 2001
 
Re: plain
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: larry
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
pipe moving
  by "Caroline Kehne" <ckehne@accglobal.net>
Re: Cleaning Pipes
  by "Larry" <Larrytow@webtv.net>
Steel wool on pipes
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: plain
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: pipe moving
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: pipe moving
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: Wesley A. Day, R.I.P.
  by <Gamelpt@aol.com>
Re: Stories in Glass Concert - March
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
organs in limbo
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Thanks All
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: Personal Experience was: to those "that have had it"
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
New Group Started
  by "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com>
NEW CD of 1921 E.M. Skinner played by Richard Webster
  by "Joe Vitacco" <joe@pipeorgancds.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: plain From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 04:36:23 -0800 (PST)   The relevance is that many on the list find it delicious and in honor of Ralph Downes, a legend in the organ world, we discuss yoghurt hoping to gain some inspiration from his legacy as well as some super new nutricious food tips. Must I always explain the obvious, dear Sebastian?   --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Aside from its VERY obvious connection with Ralph > Downes' 1968 flue scaling > revisions for the Walker rebuild of the 1872 > Cavaille-Coll - 1928 Hill Norman > and Beard organ at Paisley Abbey, what is the > relevance of yoghurt to this > list? > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > Uncultured > New York City > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: larry From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 04:39:23 -0800 (PST)   That's Ok, Arthur. Everyone forgets things.   --- ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > to: Tuba Magna: > > Give my regards to Larry Trupiano. > > Haven't seen or heard from him since 1978. > > He was reported to have expressed the opinion, then, > that I "had not changed". > > Presumably meaning that I had not changed for the > better. > > He was one of those who was considered for the organ > restoration job at Holy > Name of Jesus Church on the Upper West Side. But, > as far as I can recall > after a quarter of a century, he decided that it > wasn't profitable enough for > him to pursue the project. > So, ultimately, the job went to Bayonne --- with the > clear understanding that > there would be no tonal alterations whatsoever: only > re-leathering and other > mechanical work. > > When I left that church in 1982, the organ was about > 80% operational (albeit > without a working combination action). Word was > that, under my ineffable > successor, the combination action was restored, but > that work thereafter came > to a standstill --- when Bayonne was not paid for > work completed. > > Doesn't surprise me. While I was organist there, I > once hired the person who > would eventually succeed me in that post to play for > a funeral. He played > for the funeral (poorly, I was told), then absconded > with the singer's fee!!! > > Arthur LaMirande > > P.S. Sorry if I get some of the details of old New > York organs wrong: it's > been a long time, you know. Can you remember all > those details from 30 and > 40 years ago? >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: pipe moving From: "Caroline Kehne" <ckehne@accglobal.net> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 08:00:35 -0500   greetings all,   There was a discussion on the list a few months ago regarding different alternatives for long-distance moving of pipe organs. One firm which specialized in moving was items was mentioned, but I'm having a devil of a time finding this discussion in the archives. I would be grateful if the illustrious members of the list could direct me to a general time frame for me to search (or provide specific information). Many thanks.   keep on piping, Robert Pelletier  
(back) Subject: Re: Cleaning Pipes From: "Larry" <Larrytow@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 07:46:32 -0600 (CST)   Hi All, I thank everyone who gave advice on cleaning spotted metal pipes. There is so much experience and knowledge among the posters to this list!   I still wonder though, if using 0000 steel wool wont tend to schmear the spots? Same for Brillo pads? Or perhaps my touch is not light enough? I will be doing this project in a month or so.   As for painting and laquering, I was thinking spray it on; is this the best way?   Regards, Larry    
(back) Subject: Steel wool on pipes From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 08:54:49 EST   If cleaning historic pipework, use only mild detergent and water, nothing else. Steel wool removes and damages historic pipework, and is considered an invasive procedure. Please be careful. SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: plain From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 22:00:08 +0800   As a substitute for bananas, I believe, Ralph, particularly the green ones being consumed by Glenda! B. E.   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > what is the relevance of yoghurt to this list? > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck >    
(back) Subject: Re: pipe moving From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 09:09:16 EST   In a message dated 3/26/01 7:53:52 AM Eastern Standard Time, ckehne@accglobal.net writes:   << There was a discussion on the list a few months ago regarding different alternatives for long-distance moving of pipe organs. One firm which specialized in moving items was mentioned, but I'm having a devil of a time finding this discussion in the archives. >>  
(back) Subject: Re: pipe moving From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 09:18:20 EST   In a message dated 3/26/01 7:53:52 AM Eastern Standard Time, ckehne@accglobal.net writes:   << One firm which specialized in moving items was mentioned, but I'm having a devil of a time finding this discussion in the archives >>   I don't think you will find it in the archives, that thread was too = recent. The archives pick up in 12-00 and go back from there. I mentioned Atlas = Van Lines Special products division. Atlas puts their best movers and drivers = in that division and uses trucks with a pneumatic suspension to smooth out = the bumps. They are good but very expensive.   Good luck:   Alan B   PS: Sorry about the double post, my mouse button has a hair trigger.  
(back) Subject: Re: Wesley A. Day, R.I.P. From: <Gamelpt@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 09:42:09 EST     --part1_86.8b156ca.27f0af41_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   The correct date of the Wesley Day funeral is Tuesday, March 27th at = 3:00pm. Sorry for the date error. John Gamel   --part1_86.8b156ca.27f0af41_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>The correct date of the = Wesley Day funeral is Tuesday, March 27th at 3:00pm. <BR>Sorry for the date error. <BR>John Gamel</FONT></HTML>   --part1_86.8b156ca.27f0af41_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Stories in Glass Concert - March From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 22:40:52 +0800   Bruce. Who built that organ? Flentrop? Interesting. Wish I could be there. Bob E.=20   Cremona502@cs.com wrote: >=20 > HOLY TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH > STORIES IN GLASS >=20 > 25 March 2001 ~~ Four o=E2=80=99clock pm >=20 > The Tower Narthex Windows ~~ The Four Evangelists >=20 > Bruce Cornely, organist    
(back) Subject: organs in limbo From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 09:47:47 EST     --part1_c3.f0c80c7.27f0b093_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   New York City --- where I reside, for better or worse --- has a large = number of old organs, particularly in the many Catholic churches, which have = fallen into a state of limbo. Still sitting there, up in their organ lofts, but neglected and unused. Replaced for religious services with electronic synthetics, generally located in the front of the edifice --- where the people can SEE the organist. (So important to SEE the performers, = according to post-1964 political correctness!)   Many of these instruments date to the 19th century: Hooks, Jardines, = Odells, etc.   In Quebec (for instance), the government would take an active interest in = the preservation and restoration of such instruments. But in the United = States, governments are prevented from offering any assistance by the unduly rigid =   U.S. Supreme Court interpretations of the U.S. Constitution. (All that = the words of the Constitution actually say is that Congress shall not = establish a state religion. But our modern Supreme Court has taken this much farther, = in its present-day activist role in stating by fiat what the law of the land = is!)   And it is a sad fact that many of the parishes in which these organs are located simply do not have the financial resources to repair and/or = restore them to functional use. The Archdiocese of New York and the Diocese of Brooklyn also are not awash in liquid cash --- much of their considerable wealth is tied up in real estate and other non-liquid assets.   It's also true that many of these churches are just ordinary parishes --- = not the fashionable sort of church which attracts wealthy parishioners, or the =   attention of the AGO, for that matter. When a Catholic church gets a new (pipe) organ, it is almost invariably because of a bequest. And it's even =   harder to get bequests for restoration of old organs, no matter how meritorious.   Thus, for instance, the historic 1938 Whitelegg-Moller at the Church of = the Holy Name of Jesus on Manhattan's Upper West Side --- an extraordinary instrument for its time, with four complete principal choruses and blazing =   reeds --- languished for years (c. 1960 to c. 1978), neglected by a mismanaged parish and forgotten by the New York organ community. When I = was organist of the church in the 1970s, bid after bid was taken for its restoration (Moller, Austin, and any number of other companies, both legitimate and fly-by-night): nearly all of these bids were simply beyond = the severely limited financial resources of the church, and the Archdiocese = was in no position to assist. It didn't help that the pastor of the church, = at the time, was a lethargic incompetent who was unable or unwilling to = expend the necessary energy to raise money. (He couldn't even keep the roof properly repaired!) In fact, he refused to believe that the organ was in = any way unusual or extraordinary, and thus worthy of preservation, until an article from 1938 (in the original American Organist) was produced, = written by Dr. William H. Barnes (author of The Contemporary American Organ) = praising this instrument to the skies.   Even then, nothing got off the ground until finally one young man from Bayonne, New Jersey agreed to releather* the organ progressively, one = section at a time; and to be paid as each section was completed. (Rather than demanding a contract for complete restoration of the entire instrument, as =   everyone else was doing.) Thus, slowly, the instrument --- having been nearly silent for a decade --- came back to life.   One of the parishioners in that church was a prominent American composer. =   Now that she's deceased, I guess I can mention the name: Louise Talma. = Miss Talma had many connections in the music world, or so she said, and = promised repeatedly to approach these well-heeled individuals for contributions = toward the organ restoration. (Alice Tully was one of the names mentioned.) Nothing, however, ever came of this. Talma herself made a pledge, then withdrew it!   It was interesting to note that the organ community in New York, during = those years, was either oblivious or indifferent to the fate of this great = organ. Holy Name of Jesus, you see, was not one of the "fashionable" churches. = And the neighborhood was (then) not fashionable, either. The intrinsic = artistic merits of the instrument were of no interest to that clique. They had = quite forgotten that, back in the 1940s, the instrument had been heard = nationwide every week on the radio, in a popular radio broadcast of the time called = "The Catholic Hour". (That was back when the Mass was in Latin, and Holy Name = of Jesus had a celebrated all-male choir.)   Footnote: In July, 1998, both the organ and the church itself narrowly escaped total destruction, when a fire (mysteriously) broke out in the blower room (located in the north tower) as Mass was in progress! Miraculously, the Fire Department got there in record time and = extinguished the blaze, saving the church and the organ. The blower apparatus itself, however, was destroyed. The young man who had been organist there for = just one year chose that particular time to resign and leave town!   Since then, they've been using an electronic synthetic, located in the = front of the edifice. I've heard various tentative reports of a putative restoration of the main organ, but can't verify the information. Nobody there has invited me to take a look.   Perhaps there might be an organ builder or two on this forum who might = take an interest?   Incidentally, in the late 1980s, the church was taken over (from the Archdiocese itself) by the Franciscan Order. Under the aegis of that = Order, the church has been quite handsomely reburbished. Presumably, though, the =   organ takes last priority!   Now, I could go on and list numerous organs in the city which are not functioning at all. But that would require an entire book!   Arthur LaMirande   *Some of those bidders in the 70s (including Moller and Austin) proposed = to "releather" the organ in polyurethane. You can imagine how long THAT = would have lasted!         --part1_c3.f0c80c7.27f0b093_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>New York City --- where = I reside, for better or worse --- has a large number <BR>of old organs, particularly in the many Catholic churches, which have = fallen <BR>into a state of limbo. &nbsp;Still sitting there, up in their organ = lofts, but <BR>neglected and unused. &nbsp;Replaced for religious services with = electronic <BR>synthetics, generally located in the front of the edifice --- where = the <BR>people can SEE the organist. &nbsp;(So important to SEE the = performers, according <BR>to post-1964 political correctness!) <BR> <BR>Many of these instruments date to the 19th century: &nbsp;Hooks, = Jardines, Odells, <BR>etc. <BR> <BR>In Quebec (for instance), the government would take an active interest = in the <BR>preservation and restoration of such instruments. &nbsp;But in the = United States, <BR>governments are prevented from offering any assistance by the unduly = rigid <BR>U.S. Supreme Court interpretations of the U.S. Constitution. = &nbsp;(All that the <BR>words of the Constitution actually say is that Congress shall not = establish a <BR>state religion. &nbsp;But our modern Supreme Court has taken this much = farther, in <BR>its present-day activist role in stating by fiat what the law of the = land is!) <BR> <BR>And it is a sad fact that many of the parishes in which these organs = are <BR>located simply do not have the financial resources to repair and/or = restore <BR>them to functional use. &nbsp;The Archdiocese of New York and the = Diocese of <BR>Brooklyn also are not awash in liquid cash --- much of their = considerable <BR>wealth is tied up in real estate and other non-liquid assets. <BR> <BR>It's also true that many of these churches are just ordinary parishes --- not <BR>the fashionable sort of church which attracts wealthy parishioners, or = the <BR>attention of the AGO, for that matter. &nbsp;When a Catholic church = gets a new <BR>(pipe) organ, it is almost invariably because of a bequest. &nbsp;And = it's even <BR>harder to get bequests for restoration of old organs, no matter how <BR>meritorious. <BR> <BR>Thus, for instance, the historic 1938 Whitelegg-Moller at the Church = of the <BR>Holy Name of Jesus on Manhattan's Upper West Side --- an extraordinary =   <BR>instrument for its time, with four complete principal choruses and = blazing <BR>reeds --- languished for years (c. 1960 to c. 1978), neglected by a <BR>mismanaged parish and forgotten by the New York organ community. = &nbsp;When I was <BR>organist of the church in the 1970s, bid after bid was taken for its <BR>restoration (Moller, Austin, and any number of other companies, both <BR>legitimate and fly-by-night): nearly all of these bids were simply = beyond the <BR>severely limited financial resources of the church, and the = Archdiocese was <BR>in no position to assist. &nbsp;It didn't help that the pastor of the = church, at <BR>the time, was a lethargic incompetent who was unable or unwilling to = expend <BR>the necessary energy to raise money. &nbsp;(He couldn't even keep the = roof <BR>properly repaired!) &nbsp;In fact, he refused to believe that the = organ was in any <BR>way unusual or extraordinary, and thus worthy of preservation, until = an <BR>article from 1938 (in the original American Organist) was produced, = written <BR>by Dr. William H. Barnes (author of The Contemporary American Organ) = praising <BR>this instrument to the skies. <BR> <BR>Even then, nothing got off the ground until finally one young man from =   <BR>Bayonne, New Jersey agreed to releather* the organ progressively, one = section <BR>at a time; and to be paid as each section was completed. &nbsp;(Rather = than <BR>demanding a contract for complete restoration of the entire = instrument, as <BR>everyone else was doing.) &nbsp;Thus, slowly, the instrument --- = having been <BR>nearly silent for a decade --- came back to life. <BR> <BR>One of the parishioners in that church was a prominent American = composer. &nbsp; <BR>Now that she's deceased, I guess I can mention the name: Louise Talma. = &nbsp;Miss <BR>Talma had many connections in the music world, or so she said, and = promised <BR>repeatedly to approach these well-heeled individuals for contributions = toward <BR>the organ restoration. &nbsp;(Alice Tully was one of the names = mentioned.) &nbsp; <BR>Nothing, however, ever came of this. &nbsp;Talma herself made a = pledge, then <BR>withdrew it! <BR> <BR>It was interesting to note that the organ community in New York, = during those <BR>years, was either oblivious or indifferent to the fate of this great = organ. &nbsp; <BR>Holy Name of Jesus, you see, was not one of the "fashionable" = churches. &nbsp;And <BR>the neighborhood was (then) not fashionable, either. &nbsp;The = intrinsic artistic <BR>merits of the instrument were of no interest to that clique. = &nbsp;They had quite <BR>forgotten that, back in the 1940s, the instrument had been heard = nationwide <BR>every week on the radio, in a popular radio broadcast of the time = called "The <BR>Catholic Hour". &nbsp;(That was back when the Mass was in Latin, and = Holy Name of <BR>Jesus had a celebrated all-male choir.) <BR> <BR>Footnote: &nbsp;In July, 1998, both the organ and the church itself = narrowly <BR>escaped total destruction, when a fire (mysteriously) &nbsp;broke out = in the <BR>blower room (located in the north tower) as Mass was in progress! = &nbsp; <BR>Miraculously, the Fire Department got there in record time and = extinguished <BR>the blaze, saving the church and the organ. &nbsp;The blower apparatus = itself, <BR>however, was destroyed. &nbsp;The young man who had been organist = there for just <BR>one year chose that particular time to resign and leave town! <BR> <BR>Since then, they've been using an electronic synthetic, located in the front <BR>of the edifice. &nbsp;I've heard various tentative reports of a = putative <BR>restoration of the main organ, but can't verify the information. = &nbsp;Nobody <BR>there has invited me to take a look. <BR> <BR>Perhaps there might be an organ builder or two on this forum who might = take <BR>an interest? <BR> <BR>Incidentally, in the late 1980s, the church was taken over (from the <BR>Archdiocese itself) by the Franciscan Order. &nbsp;Under the aegis of = that Order, <BR>the church has been quite handsomely reburbished. &nbsp;Presumably, = though, the <BR>organ takes last priority! <BR> <BR>Now, I could go on and list numerous organs in the city which are not <BR>functioning at all. &nbsp;But that would require an entire book! <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande <BR> <BR>*Some of those bidders in the 70s (including Moller and Austin) = proposed to <BR>"releather" the organ in polyurethane. &nbsp;&nbsp;You can imagine how = long THAT would <BR>have lasted! <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_c3.f0c80c7.27f0b093_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Thanks All From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 10:20:03 EST     --part1_6d.114fddf0.27f0b823_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi... I guess most of you know the problems I have been facing, musically, spiritually, and family problems... I just wanted to thank each of you who took time out of your own problems = and helped my with mine. I came across this group by mistake, that has turned =   out to be the best thing that has happened to me in a long time. So far I =   have found all of you to be gracious, and kind, taking interest in what I have to say, unlike the numerous counselors, and friends that I have = talked to in the past. Things have not been easy for the past few months, and I don't see things getting any better, but at least now I have hope that I = can deal with this. And I have made a ton of new friends in the process. I = have never had anyone treat me so kind as you all have, and now I feel like my life is now worth living. I know it sounds sensitive and immature, but = there are certain things in life that are difficult to handle. Thanks again for all the support I have received from each of you, and for =   being gracious, admirable people. Thank you for being such classy people.   Josh   --part1_6d.114fddf0.27f0b823_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hi... <BR>I guess most of you know the problems I have been facing, musically, <BR>spiritually, and family problems... <BR>I just wanted to thank each of you who took time out of your own = problems and <BR>helped my with mine. &nbsp;I came across this group by mistake, that = has turned <BR>out to be the best thing that has happened to me in a long time. = &nbsp;So far I <BR>have found all of you to be gracious, and kind, taking interest in = what I <BR>have to say, unlike the numerous counselors, and friends that I have = talked <BR>to in the past. &nbsp;Things have not been easy for the past few = months, and I <BR>don't see things getting any better, but at least now I have hope that = I can <BR>deal with this. &nbsp;And I have made a ton of new friends in the = process. &nbsp;I have <BR>never had anyone treat me so kind as you all have, and now I feel like = my <BR>life is now worth living. &nbsp;I know it sounds sensitive and = immature, but there <BR>are certain things in life that are difficult to handle. &nbsp; <BR>Thanks again for all the support I have received from each of you, and = for <BR>being gracious, admirable people. &nbsp; <BR>Thank you for being such classy people. <BR> <BR>Josh</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6d.114fddf0.27f0b823_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Personal Experience was: to those "that have had it" From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 07:28:32 -0800 (PST)   In my experience there are several "types" of Ministers as regards music:   1. They have little interest and leave you alone, and often are very supportive as long as they don't have to get involved (work) or have parishioners fussing.   2. VERY supportive, enjoying teamwork, rapport, compromising on music and liturgy issues, will often go out of their way to make you (the musician) = feel appreciated and supported. I've had a couple that sang bass or tenor in = the parish choir, even.   3. Then there are the "I'm the KING (who is Jesus, then?!) types who want = to dictate every aspect of the parish, including music - even if they are admittedly untrained. These are the people to expect off the fly firings = from, and believe me, it runs throughout the church - NOT just the Episcopal = Church - My experience is that the only difference in the Episcopal Church and the others is that you just simply get fired, whereas in (my experience) other denominations there is just a LOT more paperwork to fill out! <grin>   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: New Group Started From: "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 07:31:39 -0800 (PST)   Hi-   I started a new organ group over the weekend. It won't be as high-tech as this group since I am a beginner but if any of you are interested in joining, we would love to have your expertise.   http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChiffChatt         =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: NEW CD of 1921 E.M. Skinner played by Richard Webster From: "Joe Vitacco" <joe@pipeorgancds.com> Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 10:38:59 -0500   Volume 12 of the Skinner Series has just been released. It features=20 Richard Webster playing the fully restored 1921 E.M. Skinner Organ at=20 the Parish Church of Saint Luke in Evanston, Illinois. Click below=20 for full information on the organ, stoplist, an on-line virtual tour=20 of this Skinner Organ (on home page) and purchasing information.=20 http://www.pipeorgancds.com/ricwebplay19.html   Also available from: http://www.gothicrecords.com/ -=20 http://www.ohscatalog.org/ - http://www.allegro.co.uk/ in Great=20 Britain.     The CD (JAV 125) includes:   Herbert Howells Six Pieces (1940) Saraband for the Morning of Easter Master Tallis's Testament Sigfrid Karg-Elert Chorale-Improvisations, Opus 65 (1909) Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan Ich dank dir schon O Gott, du frommer Gott Gott des Himmels und der Erden Nun danket alle Gott Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite (transcribed by Frederick Hohman) Dance of the Reed Flutes Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairies George Thalben-Ball Elegy Richard Webster Paschal Suite for Trumpet and Organ (Kevin Hartman, trumpet) Passacaglia Pastorale on a theme of Palestrina Paean to the Risen Christ Thomas Matthews: Orientis partibus Olivier Messiaen L'Ascension (1933) All=E9luias sereins d=B4une =E2me qui d=E9sire le ciel Hubert Parry Jerusalem John Williams Star Wars (transcribed by Richard Webster) Throne Room & End Title JAV Recordings - http://www.pipeorgancds.com=20