PipeChat Digest #1963 - Tuesday, March 27, 2001
 
Re: Josh and Paul, and other Subjects!
  by "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net>
Re: Harmonium (was Division of Labor)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1962 - 03/27/01
  by <StatRussell@aol.com>
The Joy of Music
  by "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au>
Whitelegg-Moller
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
The Joy of Music
  by "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au>
Re: ..to have great music
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu>
Fw: Re:Cleaning organ pipes
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: The Joy of Music
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
I'm outa here folks!!!
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Harmonium
  by "Shirley" <pnst@earthlink.net>
Re: Tempered Organs in Worship
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Harmonium
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Something in the water?
  by "Shirley" <pnst@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Josh and Paul, and other Subjects! From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2001 22:02:56 -0600       Luther Melby wrote:   > Are these mica powders the same thing as metallic auto paint?   No, they are special mica powders which are to be suspended in lacquer -- available from Sepp Leaf products in New York City.   Absolutely the best painted finish you can do to an organ pipe outside of = real gold leaf.   TC    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonium (was Division of Labor) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 14:45:08 -0800   Somebody contacted me about a two manual and pedal ENGLISH reed organ = built in the 1960s; one of the Italian music publishers still included new harmoniums = in their catalog during the same period; I'm told that they're still built in = Holland; Estey and Vocalion are long-gone in this country, though I think Estey = made their folding two-stop "missionary" reed organ until the late 1950s ... I bought = one new in the early 1950s.   There is, however, a flourishing business in restoring them in this = country, and occasionally a Mustel instrument finds its way across the pond, so they = ARE still available.   Cheers,   Bud   AMADPoet@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/27/01 9:24:32 AM Central Standard Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > << French reed organs had foundation tone and reed tone at 16-8-4, with = stops > divided at middle c, and sometimes a Vox Celeste. Registrations are > indicated by > numbers (1-2-3-4-5-6, NOT the pitch numbers) in circles. Because the = keyboard > divides at middle c, it was possible (for instance) to pull the 4' = foundation > stop in the bass and the 16' reed stop in the treble and imitate the = effect > of > playing on two manuals, and Franck OFTEN calls for that. If you simply = play > the > music as written on all 8' stops, things are in the wrong octave. >> > > Fascinating...y'all used past tense when explaining the instrument- are = any > harmoniums still being made in Europe, or is the instrument too limited = for > general use? > > Thank you yet again, gentlemen, for the terrific info... > Mandy > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1962 - 03/27/01 From: <StatRussell@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 18:02:45 EST     --part1_b8.135b52bc.27f27615_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   People, calm down! Whatever Diane Bish is playing these days more power = to her! The fact that anybody's playing at all anymore is a miracle! I'm = not that much of a purist that I feel the need for pipes only! Just getting = on a console at all is sheer pleasure, be it pipes or electronic. Just as = long as it has keys and pedals, no problem. I love Allens, Rodgers, Baldwins, Wersi (I own a Wersi Galaxy) and I'm not the least bit picky. I don't = have access to a pipe organ so I'll take what I can get. It's not what makes = the sound, it's what we can do with it that makes the difference!   Dennis R.   --part1_b8.135b52bc.27f27615_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>People, calm down! = &nbsp;Whatever Diane Bish is playing these days more power to <BR>her! &nbsp;The fact that anybody's playing at all anymore is a = miracle! &nbsp;I'm not <BR>that much of a purist that I feel the need for pipes only! = &nbsp;&nbsp;Just getting on <BR>a console at all is sheer pleasure, be it pipes or electronic. = &nbsp;Just as long <BR>as it has keys and pedals, no problem. &nbsp;I love Allens, Rodgers, = Baldwins, <BR>Wersi (I own a Wersi Galaxy) and I'm not the least bit picky. &nbsp;I = don't have <BR>access to a pipe organ so I'll take what I can get. &nbsp;It's not = what makes the <BR>sound, it's what we can do with it that makes the difference! &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Dennis R.</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b8.135b52bc.27f27615_boundary--  
(back) Subject: The Joy of Music From: "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 09:28:47 +1000   > because of The Joy Of Music, seen all over the world, I would dare say = that > Diane Bish has to be one of the most visible organists in the world = today. No > other organist has ever had such exposure. No one can deny that......... > I would! To my knowledge her program has never been broadcast in = Australia. I suppose most people are more satisfied in watching rubbish like Survivor II (which by the way was filmed no where near the Australian Outback but = in tropical North Queensland!) than programs of cultural and musical = interest.    
(back) Subject: Whitelegg-Moller From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 18:31:41 EST     --part1_b2.1338359a.27f27cdd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I am pleased that Mr. Sebastian Gluck is so well informed about the magnificent 1938 Whitelegg-Moller at Holy Name of Jesus, New York City. Since few of his colleagues evidently are.   The last organ concert to take place in that church occurred precisely NINETEEN long years ago, in March 1982. It was given by yours truly, and = the program consisted of Tournemire (an excerpt from the Sept Paroles), Scene = de la Passion by Daniel-Lesur, and the entire Passion Symphony of Dupre'.   At the time, approximately 75% to 80% of the organ was playable; but there =   was no working combination action. So, the performer had to use TWO assistants at the console, to pull stops as the performance went along.   That recital was poorly attended. The pastor of the church made no effort =   whatsoever to publicize it, and even forbade anything more than a = perfunctory announcement about the concert at that weekend's Masses.   A few weeks later came the Easter celebrations; and at the Solemn Vigil of =   Easter Mass, I used a fine trumpeter from Staten Island to add some oomph. = (The high pressure Trumpet in the Solo division was not playable.) On = that occasion, we played an arrangement of Bach's G Minor Fugue (for trumpet = and organ), among other things. Little did I know then that my tenure at that =   church would come to an abrupt end just 2 weeks later.   I was replaced with the man who, soon after, became the Placement Director =   for the New York City Chapter of the AGO. The pastor tripled the = organist's salary --- he had deliberately kept mine low, eventually forcing me to = seek full-time employment elsewhere (as an editor). Some work continued on the =   console, apparently; but the story that was circulated was that the firm doing the restoration work was not properly paid for work completed, and = so the restoration project came to a complete standstill.   The organ was still playable, however, until the fire of 1998, which destroyed the blower. I do not know what caused that fire; but it does = sound a bit fishy that a fire should break out in the blower room on a Sunday morning while Mass was in progress. In any event, the new organist --- a quite well-known name, actually --- abruptly resigned and left New York altogether.   Sebastian Gluck refers to the present pastor. That would be Father Mastroianni, I believe --- unless the reference is to the previous pastor, =   Father Hines, who was re-assigned about 2 years ago. After the = resignation of the previous organist, Fr. Hines hired a young man named Peter Adamcyck =   (sp?) to be organist, performing upon an electronic in the sanctuary. = Word is that Mr. Adamcyck pretty much takes his orders from the (lady) cantor, = who is a big wheel in that parish these days, apparently. I went to a Mass = there in 1997 (just after the appointment of the previous organist) to hear what =   was going on. The choir sang reasonably well, under the organist's direction; but most of the time the cantor was carrying on as if it were = an operatic production --- except that, of course, real opera singers do not need microphones to be heard. (And the microphone amplification was deafening!) After the Communion, the cantor sang an aria of some sort, = after which the audience applauded! (At what is supposed to be a time of quiet contemplation in the Mass!)   So: that's the state of affairs in that church. Word in 1998 and 1999 was =   that the church was having difficulties collecting the insurance money = that could have repaired the organ. But they surely must have reached a settlement by now; so if nothing is being done about the organ, it must be =   chalked up to indifference. Besides, the lady cantor might regard the = organ as a potential competitor!   Incidentally, when I was there (so long ago!), I was required to play for Masses in THREE languages: English, Spanish, and French. (A fourth, = Latin, was thrown in for special occasions like Midnight Mass of Christmas and Solemn Vigil of Easter.) Each language had completely different music. = And, in those days, the Masses took place one after the other, without a break: = English at 9 and 10, Spanish at 11, English (High Mass) at 12, and French = at 1 p.m. (Except for the summer months, when the French Mass was moved to 9 =   a.m.) There was scarcely any opportunity even to get to the facilities! = And then, the organist had to return again at 5 p.m.!   My successor was excused from the French Mass --- the Haitian priest = didn't really even want the organ used. And I was told said organist used an assistant to play for the Spanish Mass. So: he was doing far less work, = for three times as much money! It goes without saying that he did not give = any organ recitals! ( I had once invited him to give a recital there, and he = had declined.)   Aside from the organ in this church, I think the only other Whitelegg instrument in New York is somewhere in Brooklyn, but I don't recall which church. (I'm sure Mr. Gluck must know.) I think most of Whitelegg's few surviving instruments are in Pennsylvania and Maryland.   In designing the Holy Name organ, Whitelegg incorporated several ranks of pipes from the original organ, which as I recall was a Roosevelt. You can =   tell which ranks of pipes these are by the Gothic script on the pipes themselves. Mostly, they are in the Swell division.   And yes, this organ has TWO Vox Humanas --- a large one in the Swell = division and a smaller one in the Solo. This was done at the insistance of the organist back in the 1930s, Albin McDermott (who died suddenly in 1968, = after 34 years on the job). The pastor back then was a Bishop Stephen Donaghue, =   who in 1938 became Administrator of the Archdiocese of New York upon the death of Cardinal Hayes. The good Bishop fully expected to become the = next Archbishop; but unfortunately for him the Pope (Pius XI) also died that = year. The new Pope (Pius XII) chose to appoint (in 1939) a young bishop from Boston whom he had come to know and befriend at the North American College = in Rome, one Francis Spellman. Poor Bishop Donaghue never did quite recover from the shock, evidently; and in his later years spent long periods out = of the city, leaving the administration of the parish to assistant priests. Thus began the long period of mismanagement in that church. Which = culminated c. 1970 when an organ firm ---- the name is not important now --- was = brought in to releather the organ: said firm took down 90% of the boards, then absconded with the large deposit, leaving the boards lying around willy-nilly. Such was the situation when I was appointed in the fall of 1973. (At least: the boards were still all there, and had not been = removed from the church. Be grateful for small favors!)   By 1978, we were down to mere portions of just 3 or 4 ranks; so it finally =   dawned on them that something had to be done. As for lying on one's back: = I frequently had to do just that, when a cipher occurred during Mass (due to = an ancient leather pouch expiring): I would have to Scotch-tape the pouch opening with tissue paper, to stop the cipher! It was no wonder that no = one else wanted that job, at that time! (But after the organ started to come back to life, all of a sudden there were quite a number of inquiries --- = all of which took place behind my back, naturally.)   I think that the only way that organ is going to be restored is if some wealthy benefactor makes a bequest for that specific purpose. So far, I haven't heard of any. But, at least, the organ is still there; it hasn't been removed from the premises. (One builder back in the 70s --- a very well-known name, in = fact --- proposed to junk the Whitelegg-Moller and replace it with one of his = own, of half the size, for $100,000. (1975 pre-inflation dollars!)   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_b2.1338359a.27f27cdd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I am pleased that Mr. = Sebastian Gluck is so well informed about the <BR>magnificent 1938 Whitelegg-Moller at Holy Name of Jesus, New York = City. &nbsp; <BR>Since few of his colleagues evidently are. <BR> <BR>The last organ concert to take place in that church occurred precisely =   <BR>NINETEEN long years ago, in March 1982. &nbsp;It was given by yours = truly, and the <BR>program consisted of Tournemire (an excerpt from the Sept Paroles), = Scene de <BR>la Passion by Daniel-Lesur, and the entire Passion Symphony of Dupre'. <BR> <BR>At the time, approximately 75% to 80% of the organ was playable; but = there <BR>was no working combination action. &nbsp;So, the performer had to use = TWO <BR>assistants at the console, to pull stops as the performance went = along. <BR> <BR>That recital was poorly attended. &nbsp;The pastor of the church made = no effort <BR>whatsoever to publicize it, and even forbade anything more than a = perfunctory <BR>announcement about the concert at that weekend's Masses. <BR> <BR>A few weeks later came the Easter celebrations; and at the Solemn = Vigil of <BR>Easter Mass, I used a fine trumpeter from Staten Island to add some = oomph. &nbsp; <BR>(The high pressure Trumpet in the Solo division was not playable.) = &nbsp;On that <BR>occasion, we played an arrangement of Bach's G Minor Fugue (for = trumpet and <BR>organ), among other things. &nbsp;Little did I know then that my = tenure at that <BR>church would come to an abrupt end just 2 weeks later. <BR> <BR>I was replaced with the man who, soon after, became the Placement = Director <BR>for the New York City Chapter of the AGO. &nbsp;The pastor tripled the = organist's <BR>salary --- he had deliberately kept mine low, eventually forcing me to = seek <BR>full-time employment elsewhere (as an editor). &nbsp;Some work = continued on the <BR>console, apparently; but the story that was circulated was that the = firm <BR>doing the restoration work was not properly paid for work completed, = and so <BR>the restoration project came to a complete standstill. <BR> <BR>The organ was still playable, however, until the fire of 1998, which <BR>destroyed the blower. &nbsp;I do not know what caused that fire; but = it does sound <BR>a bit fishy that a fire should break out in the blower room on a = Sunday <BR>morning while Mass was in progress. &nbsp;In any event, the new = organist --- a <BR>quite well-known name, actually --- abruptly resigned and left New = York <BR>altogether. <BR> <BR>Sebastian Gluck refers to the present pastor. &nbsp;That would be = Father <BR>Mastroianni, I believe --- unless the reference is to the previous = pastor, <BR>Father Hines, who was re-assigned about 2 years ago. &nbsp;After the = resignation <BR>of the previous organist, Fr. Hines hired a young man named Peter = Adamcyck <BR>(sp?) to be organist, performing upon an electronic in the sanctuary. = &nbsp;Word <BR>is that Mr. Adamcyck pretty much takes his orders from the (lady) = cantor, who <BR>is a big wheel in that parish these days, apparently. &nbsp;I went to = a Mass there <BR>in 1997 (just after the appointment of the previous organist) to hear = what <BR>was going on. &nbsp;The choir sang reasonably well, under the = organist's <BR>direction; but most of the time the cantor was carrying on as if it = were an <BR>operatic production --- except that, of course, real opera singers do = not <BR>need microphones to be heard. &nbsp;(And the &nbsp;microphone = amplification was <BR>deafening!) &nbsp;After the Communion, the cantor sang an aria of some = sort, after <BR>which the audience applauded! &nbsp;(At what is supposed to be a time = of quiet <BR>contemplation in the Mass!) <BR> <BR>So: that's the state of affairs in that church. &nbsp;Word in 1998 and = 1999 was <BR>that the church was having difficulties collecting the insurance money = that <BR>could have repaired the organ. &nbsp;But they surely must have reached = a <BR>settlement by now; so if nothing is being done about the organ, it = must be <BR>chalked up to indifference. &nbsp;Besides, the lady cantor might = regard the organ <BR>as a potential competitor! <BR> <BR>Incidentally, when I was there (so long ago!), I was required to play = for <BR>Masses in THREE languages: English, Spanish, and French. &nbsp;(A = fourth, Latin, <BR>was thrown in for special occasions like Midnight Mass of Christmas = and <BR>Solemn Vigil of Easter.) &nbsp;Each language had completely different = music. &nbsp;And, <BR>in those days, the Masses took place one after the other, without a = break: &nbsp; <BR>English at 9 and 10, Spanish &nbsp;at 11, English (High Mass) at 12, = and French at <BR>1 p.m. &nbsp;(Except for the summer months, when the French Mass was = moved to 9 <BR>a.m.) &nbsp;There was scarcely any opportunity even to get to the = facilities! &nbsp;And <BR>then, the organist had to return again at 5 p.m.! <BR> <BR>My successor was excused from the French Mass --- the Haitian priest = didn't <BR>really even want the organ used. &nbsp;And I was told said organist = used an <BR>assistant to play for the Spanish Mass. &nbsp;So: he was doing far = less work, for <BR>three times as much money! &nbsp;It goes without saying that he did = not give any <BR>organ recitals! &nbsp;( I had once invited him to give a recital = there, and he had <BR>declined.) <BR> <BR>Aside from the organ in this church, I think the only other Whitelegg <BR>instrument in New York is somewhere in Brooklyn, but I don't recall = which <BR>church. &nbsp;(I'm sure Mr. Gluck must know.) &nbsp;I think most of = Whitelegg's few <BR>surviving instruments are in Pennsylvania and Maryland. <BR> <BR>In designing the Holy Name organ, Whitelegg incorporated several ranks = of <BR>pipes from the original organ, which as I recall was a Roosevelt. = &nbsp;You can <BR>tell which ranks of pipes these are by the Gothic script on the pipes <BR>themselves. &nbsp;Mostly, they are in the Swell division. <BR> <BR>And yes, this organ has TWO Vox Humanas --- a large one in the Swell = division <BR>and a smaller one in the Solo. &nbsp;This was done at the insistance = of the <BR>organist back in the 1930s, Albin McDermott (who died suddenly in = 1968, after <BR>34 years on the job). &nbsp;The pastor back then was a Bishop Stephen = Donaghue, <BR>who in 1938 became Administrator of the Archdiocese of New York upon = the <BR>death of Cardinal Hayes. &nbsp;The good Bishop fully expected to = become the next <BR>Archbishop; but unfortunately for him the Pope (Pius XI) also died = that year. <BR>&nbsp;The new Pope (Pius XII) chose to appoint (in 1939) a young = bishop from <BR>Boston whom he had come to know and befriend at the North American = College in <BR>Rome, one Francis Spellman. &nbsp;Poor Bishop Donaghue never did quite = recover <BR>from the shock, evidently; and in his later years spent long periods = out of <BR>the city, leaving the administration of the parish to assistant = priests. <BR>Thus began the long period of mismanagement in that church. = &nbsp;Which culminated <BR>c. 1970 when an organ firm ---- the name is not important now --- was = brought <BR>in to releather the organ: said firm took down 90% of the boards, then =   <BR>absconded with the large deposit, leaving the boards lying around <BR>willy-nilly. &nbsp;Such was the situation when I was appointed in the = fall of <BR>1973. &nbsp;(At least: the boards were still all there, and had not = been removed <BR>from the church. &nbsp;Be grateful for small favors!) <BR> <BR>By 1978, we were down to mere portions of just 3 or 4 ranks; so it = finally <BR>dawned on them that something had to be done. &nbsp;As for lying on = one's back: &nbsp;I <BR>frequently had to do just that, when a cipher occurred during Mass = (due to an <BR>ancient leather pouch expiring): I would have to Scotch-tape the pouch =   <BR>opening with tissue paper, to stop the cipher! &nbsp;It was no wonder = that no one <BR>else wanted that job, at that time! &nbsp;(But after the organ started = to come <BR>back to life, all of a sudden there were quite a number of inquiries --- all <BR>of which took place behind my back, naturally.) <BR> <BR>I think that the only way that organ is going to be restored is if = some <BR>wealthy benefactor makes a bequest for that specific purpose. &nbsp;So = far, I <BR>haven't heard of any. <BR>But, at least, the organ is still there; it hasn't been removed from = the <BR>premises. &nbsp;(One builder back in the 70s --- a very well-known = name, in fact <BR>--- proposed to junk the Whitelegg-Moller and replace it with one of = his own, <BR>of half the size, for $100,000. &nbsp;(1975 pre-inflation dollars!) <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b2.1338359a.27f27cdd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: The Joy of Music From: "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 09:39:57 +1000   > No other organist has ever had such exposure.   I can think of several organists who have had MUCH more EXPOSURE.....but = I'm not going to go any further into that one! :-)    
(back) Subject: Re: ..to have great music From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 18:54:33 -0500   Randy Terry writes:   >I've got a recording of a Casavant rebuild of a Phelpsavant in Augusta = >with a Walker digital solo organ. . .   I can tell you all about this instrument. . .I used to take lessons on it. This is the instrument at St. Paul's Episcopal in Augusta, GA. Yes, the big reed (a Tuba) is real, as is most of the instrument (except for the 32s, the solo division, and the 8' Principal on the swell). The room definitely helps any musical performance in there.   -Stephen Karr  
(back) Subject: Fw: Re:Cleaning organ pipes From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2001 23:02:01 -0500   Bob- Well, whatchya waitin' fer?!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 23, 2001 10:32 PM Subject: Re: Re:Cleaning organ pipes     > At 09:29 PM 3/23/01 -0500, you wrote: > >Re: Horse trough for cleaning pipes for BOB CONWAY > > > > Want me to send you a 12-footer? We have a farm and hardware store here > >in cornfield country that sells 'em. > >(big silly grin) > > > >Rick > Thanks for the offer, but we already have an under-used horse > trough! Haven't seen any horses or organ pipes there in years! > > Bob Conway > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: The Joy of Music From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 18:59:45 -0500   Wait a minute here!!! There's an organist who's had more exposure than = Diane Bish? More exposure than an 18-year running television series can provide? Let's not forget up until 1992, she was the organist on "Coral Ridge Ministries", every Sunday morning. Sure, there was Fred Swann, who was featured every Sunday on "The Hour Of Power", but he didn't have his own series apart from that. Peter Biachi was also featured a few times.   If there is or was an an organist who's had more exposure than Diane Bish, then let's see some name. This I'd like to see. I may learn something else on this list.........   Carlo    
(back) Subject: I'm outa here folks!!! From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 19:14:14 -0500   That's it. I've had just about all I can take from this list. Ben Baldus just sent something to me, and I'd like to share it with you all....   "I find your contributions to this list to be nothing short of drivel. = Your lack of breadth and depth of knowledge with regard to organs, organists, church music and liturgy is simply astonishing. Only Christian charity stopped from publishing my thoughts to the lists you have so generously "blessed" with your ill-informed opinions"   I'll continue to keep in touch with the nice people on this list, although they're becoming few and far between. There's only so much abuse I can = take. I'm off to my other lists...lists whose members are human beings.......not pompous 'donkeys'   Carlo Pietroniro    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonium From: "Shirley" <pnst@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 19:17:49 -0500   Sed Our Very Own QM on PC-L:   >A Harmonium is a PRESSURE reed organ vs what is many times referred to as =   >an American reed organ which operates on SUCTION.     Hence, a Harmonium is female, and the American reed organ is male. = Keereckt?   <<ducking & running>>   --Shrrl      
(back) Subject: Re: Tempered Organs in Worship From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 19:23:42 EST   In a message dated 3/27/01 2:46:28 PM EST, Oboe32@aol.com writes:   > Equal organs are great for service and quite a bit of repertoire, but = some > temperaments make repertoire grand, though leaving much to be desired = for > hymnody. I suppose you could always be like the Duke Chapel and have 3 major > organs! > I had the distinct dis-pleasure of hearing Franck (3rd Chorale in A-minor) =   played on a recently installed Boutique-Builder organ which is in Wreckmeistre 3 distemper. The cromaticism of Franck's music, along with = much other "French SYmphonic" repertoire simply does NOT work well on organs = tuned on other than equal-temper tuning (IMNSHO). The same concert, same = organist played a major Bach P&F (don't remember which one right at present) and is =   was like hearing a different organ, the music didn't "fight" the tuning = and was quite pleasant to listen to.   As far as Duke is concerned, 2 major organs (the AEolian and the VonBeckerath) and one quirky little double-temperament organ tucked away = in the side "family" chapel.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonium From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 19:27:05 -0500     >Sed Our Very Own QM on PC-L: > >>A Harmonium is a PRESSURE reed organ vs what is many times referred to = as >>an American reed organ which operates on SUCTION. > > >Hence, a Harmonium is female, and the American reed organ is male. = Keereckt? > ><<ducking & running>> > > --Shrrl > >As well you might, Shirl!   Don't get your knickers in a twist!   Bob ...                    
(back) Subject: Something in the water? From: "Shirley" <pnst@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 20:14:33 -0500   Must be something in the water.   Add MY name to the list of those who have sent things to this list meant for elsewhere.   Mea culpa.   --Shirley