PipeChat Digest #1972 - Wednesday, March 28, 2001
 
1938 article by William H. Barnes
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
pointing fingers...and electonic vs pipe
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1967 - 03/28/01
  by "alantaylor" <alantaylor@onetel.net.uk>
RE: Bish owns a Ro(d)gers?
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
why organists get discouraged, bitter, etc.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
motets for First Mass (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: motets for First Mass (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Follow-up
  by "Joshua Haberman" <joshua@haberman.com>
Re: Tempered Organs in Worship
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Big Name Organists
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Bish owns a Ro(d)gers?
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: 1938 article by William H. Barnes From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 15:06:06 EST     --part1_f3.8aee8a6.27f39e2e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Here are excerpts from the article written by Dr. William H. Barnes in the =   May 1938 issue of the (original) American Organist, with reference to the (then: newly installed) Whitelegg-Moller organ in the Church of the Holy = Name of Jesus in New York:   "The organ is naturally of the clarified-ensemble type.... We can = therefore form a very comprehensive opinion, from this new major work of Moller's, just where = Mr. Whitelegg's tonal ideas lead them when he is practically unhampered in carrying them out. The only restriction placed on Mr. Whitelegg was the necessity of using some sets of pipes from the old organ --- particularly some Pedal ranks and some of the subsidiary Swell stops. This, however, = was not much of a restriction, as the pipes were all sent to the factory for revoicing and scaling; and the pipes so used were for the most part the = less important voices. All the Diapason chorus on the Great, including the 12 ranks of mixtures were entirely new, as well as the Swell chorus reeds and =   mixture, so that the main body of tone one gets from this instrument is practically unrestricted Whitelegg quality.   "Mr. Whitelegg shares with Senator Richard [designer of the great organ in =   the Atlantic City, New Jersey Convention Hall] the opinion that a large = Great organ, such as this, needs no chorus reed tone. The many mixtures more = than compensate. Formerly, 16', 8', and 4' Trombas would inevitably have been introduced in a Great of this size. I agree that we are distinctly better =   off without them.   "Although the specification shows only one unison Diapason on the Great, there are, for all practical purposes, three. The Harmonic Flute on this organ has now evolved itself more into a Diapason than a flute, which is probably all to the good, as it never was of much account as a flute, or anything else, with its excessive neutrality of color. The Keraulophone = is an old stop, frequently found in small English organs, which had become practically obsolete, but which seems to warrant revival. The character = is somewhat horny, and it does well enough as a third Diapason, with a timbre = of its own. All the Diapason chorus, including the mixtures, are of wide, = low mouth, low-pressure, and are amply harmonically developed, with very much smaller scales than would have been thought necessary not so long ago for = an organ to fill so large a church as this. Clarity and brilliance here make = up for sheer weight of tone.   "Noting that the principal Diapason is only 44 scale, with the other = voices of the chorus accurately scaled to balance and match this scale, will = prove what I have just remarked. Formerly, a 40 or 38 scale Diapason would have =   been almost inevitable. It must be pointed out that these changes are not mere caprice or whim. = They have sound logic back of them, if we want a clarified ensemble. We cannot =   get it in any other way.   "The Swell organ is quite conventional, for an organ of this size. I question the value of an Aeoline, in an organ in so large a church, or for =   that matter in anyh organ where a Dulciana and Unda Maris are present, or = a pair of Spitzfloetes. [Note: the Aeoline was one of those stops carried = over from the previous Roosevelt organ. --- A.L.] The 5r Plein-Jeu is a = beauty. This is a most successful type of Swell mixture, and tops the brilliant French type chorus reeds to perfection, with nothing but octaves of the unison and fifth. Two of the Great mixtures are also of this type. The third mixture on the Great, which draws separately, has the Tierce and flat-21st sounding ranks, and also the two Sesquialteras on the Choir and Pedal Organs.   "The Choir Organ has a very complete ensemble of its own, including a 4' Principal and five ranks of mixtures.   "The Solo Organ is notable chiefly for its return, to some extent, to the idea of a big Solo reed, but not to the Tuba quality. That would utterly ruin the clarity of the ensemble so carefully developed. Instead, it is = of extremely brilliant character, with French shallots, and with the 10" pressure employed is perhaps more assertive in the ensemble than would = suit some ears. There is, however, a perfectly satisfactory and sufficiently powerful ensemble available without this powerful reed, and consequently = it can be totally ignored by those organists who do not relish any dominating =   voice of an character. This is surely the right quality of tone for a = Solo Trumpet; the only argument could be as to its relative intensity with = respect to the remainder of the organ.   "The Pedal Organ bears the earmarks of Senator Richard's preaching = concerning the merits of independent Pedal voices. The independent Octave, = Superoctave, and five ranks of mixtures all bear this out. Personally, I should = greatly prefer five pipes down to GGGG of the 32' Bourdon, or a 32' Waldhorn, or = some suggestion of a 32' sto in an organ of this size and importance. I could readily have foregone some of the independent higher pitched Pedal voices = to have obtained one 32' stop, or even part of a 32' stop. But here again, = it is opinion and this is only my personal idea of what is relatively = important in a Pedal Organ.   "The organ sounds magnificent in the body of the Church, where naturally = the majority of listeners will hear it. At the console, it borders on the = hard side. This suggestion of hardness entirely disappears when heard in the Church, so I cannot consider it to be a criticism. Organists trying the organ for the first time might gain the impression of a certain hardness. =   When they hear the organ played by some one else, from the Church, I know that they will agree that here is a superb example of the best in modern organ building."   William H. Barnes transcribed for this 2001 forum by Arthur LaMirande (organist of Holy Name = of Jesus Church, 1973 to 1982)   --part1_f3.8aee8a6.27f39e2e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Here are excerpts from = the article written by Dr. William H. Barnes in the <BR>May 1938 issue of the (original) American Organist, with reference to = the <BR>(then: newly installed) Whitelegg-Moller organ in the Church of the = Holy Name <BR>of Jesus in New York: <BR> <BR>"The organ is naturally of the clarified-ensemble type.... We can = therefore <BR>form a very <BR>comprehensive opinion, from this new major work of Moller's, just = where Mr. <BR>Whitelegg's tonal ideas lead them when he is practically unhampered in =   <BR>carrying them out. &nbsp;The only restriction placed on Mr. Whitelegg = was the <BR>necessity of using some sets of pipes from the old organ --- = particularly <BR>some Pedal ranks and some of the subsidiary Swell stops. &nbsp;This, = however, was <BR>not much of a restriction, as the pipes were all sent to the factory = for <BR>revoicing and scaling; and the pipes so used were for the most part = the less <BR>important voices. &nbsp;All the Diapason chorus on the Great, = including the 12 <BR>ranks of mixtures were entirely new, as well as the Swell chorus reeds = and <BR>mixture, so that the main body of tone one gets from this instrument = is <BR>practically unrestricted Whitelegg quality. <BR> <BR>"Mr. Whitelegg shares with Senator Richard [designer of the great = organ in <BR>the Atlantic City, New Jersey Convention Hall] the opinion that a = large Great <BR>organ, such as this, needs no chorus reed tone. &nbsp;The many = mixtures more than <BR>compensate. &nbsp;Formerly, 16', 8', and 4' Trombas would inevitably = have been <BR>introduced in a Great of this size. &nbsp;I agree that we are = distinctly better <BR>off without them. <BR> <BR>"Although the specification shows only one unison Diapason on the = Great, <BR>there are, for all practical purposes, three. &nbsp;The Harmonic Flute = on this <BR>organ has now evolved itself more into a Diapason than a flute, which is <BR>probably all to the good, as it never was of much account as a flute, = or <BR>anything else, with its excessive neutrality of color. &nbsp;The = Keraulophone is <BR>an old stop, frequently found in small English organs, which had = become <BR>practically obsolete, but which seems to warrant revival. &nbsp;The = character is <BR>somewhat horny, and it does well enough as a third Diapason, with a = timbre of <BR>its own. &nbsp;All the Diapason chorus, including the mixtures, are of = wide, low <BR>mouth, low-pressure, and are amply harmonically developed, with very = much <BR>smaller scales than would have been thought necessary not so long ago = for an <BR>organ to fill so large a church as this. &nbsp;Clarity and brilliance = here make up <BR>for sheer weight of tone. <BR> <BR>"Noting that the principal Diapason is only 44 scale, with the other = voices <BR>of the chorus accurately scaled to balance and match this scale, will = prove <BR>what I have just remarked. &nbsp;Formerly, a 40 or 38 scale Diapason = would have <BR>been almost inevitable. <BR>It must be pointed out that these changes are not mere caprice or = whim. &nbsp;They <BR>have sound logic back of them, if we want a clarified ensemble. = &nbsp;We cannot <BR>get it in any other way. <BR> <BR>"The Swell organ is quite conventional, for an organ of this size. = &nbsp;I <BR>question the value of an Aeoline, in an organ in so large a church, or = for <BR>that matter in anyh organ where a Dulciana and Unda Maris are present, = or a <BR>pair of Spitzfloetes. &nbsp;[Note: the Aeoline was one of those stops = carried over <BR>from the previous Roosevelt organ. --- A.L.] &nbsp;The 5r Plein-Jeu is = a beauty. &nbsp; <BR>This is a most successful type of Swell mixture, and tops the = brilliant <BR>French type chorus reeds to perfection, with nothing but octaves of = the <BR>unison and fifth. &nbsp;Two of the Great mixtures are also of this = type. &nbsp;The <BR>third mixture on the Great, which draws separately, has the Tierce and =   <BR>flat-21st sounding ranks, and also the two Sesquialteras on the Choir = and <BR>Pedal Organs. <BR> <BR>"The Choir Organ has a very complete ensemble of its own, including a = 4' <BR>Principal and five ranks of mixtures. <BR> <BR>"The Solo Organ is notable chiefly for its return, to some extent, to = the <BR>idea of a big Solo reed, but not to the Tuba quality. &nbsp;That would = utterly <BR>ruin the clarity of the ensemble so carefully developed. = &nbsp;Instead, it is of <BR>extremely brilliant character, with French shallots, and with the 10" <BR>pressure employed is perhaps more assertive in the ensemble than would = suit <BR>some ears. &nbsp;There is, however, a perfectly satisfactory and = sufficiently <BR>powerful ensemble available without this powerful reed, and = consequently it <BR>can be totally ignored by those organists who do not relish any = dominating <BR>voice of an character. &nbsp;This is surely the right quality of tone = for a Solo <BR>Trumpet; the only argument could be as to its relative intensity with = respect <BR>to the remainder of the organ. <BR> <BR>"The Pedal Organ bears the earmarks of Senator Richard's preaching = concerning <BR>the merits of independent Pedal voices. &nbsp;The independent Octave, = Superoctave, <BR>and five ranks of mixtures all bear this out. &nbsp;Personally, I = should greatly <BR>prefer five pipes down to GGGG of the 32' Bourdon, or a 32' Waldhorn, = or some <BR>suggestion of a 32' sto in an organ of this size and importance. = &nbsp;I could <BR>readily have foregone some of the independent higher pitched Pedal = voices to <BR>have obtained one 32' stop, or even part of a 32' stop. &nbsp;But here = again, it <BR>is opinion and this is only my personal idea of what is relatively = important <BR>in a Pedal Organ. <BR> <BR>"The organ sounds magnificent in the body of the Church, where = naturally the <BR>majority of listeners will hear it. &nbsp;At the console, it borders = on the hard <BR>side. &nbsp;This suggestion of hardness entirely disappears when heard in the <BR>Church, so I cannot consider it to be a criticism. &nbsp;Organists = trying the <BR>organ for the first time might gain the impression of a certain = hardness. &nbsp; <BR>When they hear the organ played by some one else, from the Church, I = know <BR>that they will agree that here is a superb example of the best in = modern <BR>organ building." <BR> <BR>William H. Barnes <BR>transcribed for this 2001 forum by Arthur LaMirande (organist of Holy = Name of <BR>Jesus Church, 1973 to 1982)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f3.8aee8a6.27f39e2e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: pointing fingers...and electonic vs pipe From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 15:11:53 EST     --part1_27.130d0941.27f39f89_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Let me point out that it is very rude to point any fingers at Arthur LaMirande, and others. Arthur LaMirande has helped me out tremendously and I think he needs to = have his good qualities pointed out! I'm sure that he is a fine organist, with = a wealth of knowledge to share with us!   Electronic Vs Pipe...   I figured I would put my 2 cents in on this subject while I am at it... Although I have never encountered an organ that I was too good to play, I = set sort of a stereotype for pianos... I considerer myself to be one of the finest natural pianists in the state = of TX, and there are pianos that I, quite frankly, consider myself too good = to play. Not that I would ever flat REFUSE to play, if ever requested, but I =   would do it with great remorse! But then again I have played at churches = who have had beautiful 9' concert grands that have sounded like junk, also I = have played on extremely old uprights, that have cosmetically looks like junk, = but have sounded better than some of the 9' concert grands that have gone = through years of abuse! But, then, the piano is a COMPLETELY different ball game, so maybe I shouldn't go into that subject! Thanks Josh       --part1_27.130d0941.27f39f89_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Let me point out that = it is very rude to point any fingers at Arthur <BR>LaMirande, and others. &nbsp; <BR>Arthur LaMirande has helped me out tremendously and I think he needs = to have <BR>his good qualities pointed out! &nbsp;I'm sure that he is a fine = organist, with a <BR>wealth of knowledge to share with us! <BR> <BR>Electronic Vs Pipe... <BR> <BR>I figured I would put my 2 cents in on this subject while I am at = it... <BR>Although I have never encountered an organ that I was too good to = play, I set <BR>sort of a stereotype for pianos... <BR>I considerer myself to be one of the finest natural pianists in the = state of <BR>TX, and there are pianos that I, quite frankly, consider myself too = good to <BR>play. &nbsp;Not that I would ever flat REFUSE to play, if ever = requested, but I <BR>would do it with great remorse! &nbsp;But then again I have played at = churches who <BR>have had beautiful 9' concert grands that have sounded like junk, also = I have <BR>played on extremely old uprights, that have cosmetically looks like = junk, but <BR>have sounded better than some of the 9' concert grands that have gone = through <BR>years of abuse! <BR>But, then, the piano is a COMPLETELY different ball game, so maybe I <BR>shouldn't go into that subject! <BR>Thanks <BR>Josh <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_27.130d0941.27f39f89_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1967 - 03/28/01 From: "alantaylor" <alantaylor@onetel.net.uk> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 21:40:48 +0100   Bob Elms writes that Diana Bish is not known in the OZ. This also goes for the UK.   Cheers   Alan Taylor--------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: The Joy of Music From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 22:07:48 +0800   Pardon! Has anyone heard of Gillan Weir? Or Marie Clare-Alain? Personally I only heard of Diane Bish from the list here, and I doubt whether more than a handful in this country (OZ) has ever heard her name. B. E.      
(back) Subject: RE: Bish owns a Ro(d)gers? From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 15:01:57 -0600   While we're at it, let's spell "misspelling" correctly.... :-)   -----Original Message----- From: Jon C. Habermaas [mailto:opus1100@catoe.org] Sent: Wednesday, March 28, 2001 11:36 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Bish owns a Ro(d)gers?       >Does anyone else on the list find it annoying that all the intelligient >folks on this list have let this mispelling go on for so long......     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: why organists get discouraged, bitter, etc. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 13:21:52 -0800   Here's a thing to consider: organists of my age (and older) laboured mightily in the RC churches, often with low pay, atrocious working conditions, dreadful organs, arrogant pastors, etc., often succeeding in producing fine music IN SPITE of all that.   Prior to Vatican !!, the patrimony of RC music from Chant to Palestrina to Mozart to Bruckner and later was THERE for the doing, IF you could scrape together the forces to DO it, and the priests would LET you ... I had an Irish pastor at my first RC job who BANNED the singing of Gregorian Chant in "his" church. Well, at least I have him to thank for introducing me to the fun (if TERMINALLY decadent) Griesbacher propers (grin).   AFTER Vatican !!, 99% of the few good pre-Vatican !! RC music programs were demolished by younger priests and ex-nuns who seemed to pop up everywhere on the newly-formed "liturgy and music committees" ... one ex-nun in San Diego made a CAREER of going from parish to parish and chasing out the "traditional" musicians. She would get herself hired as a "music and liturgy consultant" ... invariably within six months the organist and the choir would be GONE.   What *I* don't understand about sad situations like Holy Name of Jesus in NYC is the MONEY involved ... those big organs cost a FORTUNE in their day ... had they been maintained, they'd be worth MILLIONS today. It seems to me that somebody should take the PRIESTS to task for playing fast and loose with the congregation's donations *and* WASTING them ... and many of those churches and organs were built with immigrants' nickels and dimes.   RC churches are a GOLD MINE for Organ Clearing House ... true, some organs come from dying inner-city parishes that can no longer afford to keep the DOORS open, much LESS maintain the organs; but some don't. These days, as many are being tossed out by suburban churches built in the '40s and '50s in the name of "relevance". PTOOEY!!!   I finally swam the Thames back to Holy Mother Canterbury (grin), only to watch ECUSA do the same damn thing ten years later. I don't recognize ECUSA services these days ... they're certainly not the Episcopal services *I* grew up with.   Thank GOD in my old age I found a "continuing" Anglican parish that pays me a living wage and benefits, with the traditional Anglican liturgy, a decent choir, a decent organ on the way (if I LIVE that long) (grin), and an intelligent (if sometimes infuriating) Rector.   I can do the patrimony of the Anglican choral heritage, limited only by the number of singers in my choir and (for the moment) the dreadful organ, but said dreadful organ is OUT THE DOOR THIS WEEK (grin), even if I have to play the PIANO until they decide what they're gonna do. I don't know what they're WAITING for (grin) ... it WON'T play.   But that'll get solved, and it'll get solved to my satisfaction. I know that. So I'm just sitting back and finishing typesetting the Holy Week manuals for the choir ... I promised them they wouldn't have to sing from hand-written manuscripts again this year (grin).   So don't be TOO hard on us if we get up on the wrong side of the bed occasionally ... we've borne the battle and the heat of the day (grin).   Cheers,   Bud the Antique Curmudgeon    
(back) Subject: motets for First Mass (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 13:32:53 -0800   Does anyone have any good settings of "Ecce Sacerdos Magnus" or "Juravit Dominus/Tu Es Sacerdos", in either Latin or English? I have a First Mass coming up, and it's been so long since I've done one (thirty years??!!) that I've lost whatever I DID have.   Failing all else, I guess we can sing "Vivat Pastor Bonus" out of the St. Basil Hymnal (grinning and ducking)!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: motets for First Mass (X-posted) From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 22:47:14 +0100   If you can lay your hands on 3 tromebones, how about the Bruckner 'Ecce Sacerdos Magnus"???!!! I sang it when I was in my University Chapel Choir for the installation of the new Dean of Chapel. I took over the choir the follwoing year but we didn't see eye to eye on many things!!! I'm fairly high church Anglican and he was very low!   I haven't posted many times before... I'm a young Organist, (24) and have been organist and choirmaster at my cuurrent parish church for nearly 4 years now. I just wish that there were more full time jobs for church musicians over here in the UK. I'll always have difficulty in getting = into the Cathedrals because I haven't done things the 'traditional' way (Oxford or Cambridge organ scholarship, assistant Cathedral organist etc...)... = I'm always looking for a back-door way in though! To pay the bills I teach = full time 11-18s - the bonus to that is that there is a small organ in the hall to play every day! I also do lots of voluntary work for the Royal School = of Church Music in the Canterbury Diocese - I'm the Education and Training officer and an examiner for the chorister awards. Does the RSCM have much of an impact in the States?   Anyway, that's enough from me now!   Cheers,   Steve Barker Canterbury, Kent, England.     ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "+mailing list, ANGLICAN-MUSIC" <anglican-music@list.stsams.org>; "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com>; "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 28, 2001 10:32 PM Subject: motets for First Mass (X-posted)     > Does anyone have any good settings of "Ecce Sacerdos Magnus" or "Juravit > Dominus/Tu Es Sacerdos", in either Latin or English? I have a First Mass > coming up, and it's been so long since I've done one (thirty years??!!) > that I've lost whatever I DID have. > > Failing all else, I guess we can sing "Vivat Pastor Bonus" out of the > St. Basil Hymnal (grinning and ducking)! > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Follow-up From: "Joshua Haberman" <joshua@haberman.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 14:16:53 -0800   * Administrator (admin@pipechat.org) wrote: > I have found it interesting that the posting that set me off was from > a young person and that this morning I found a posting to the list > from another of the young people, Josh, that appeared on the list.   Is everyone aware that there are two young people named "Josh" on this list? One of them is me, and the other is not. :-)   My name is Joshua Haberman, and I attend the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. My e-mail address is joshua@haberman.com. I've only posted a few times.   I don't think the other Josh has not posted his last name, but he's the one who posted his story about bad experiences at a church after a change of pastor. His e-mail address is Pologaptommy@aol.com.   Just wanted to clear that up, in case there was any confusion.   Joshua   -- Joshua Haberman = <joshua@haberman.com> University of Puget Sound = <joshua@debian.org> http://www.reverberate.org = <jhaberman@ups.edu>  
(back) Subject: Re: Tempered Organs in Worship From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 17:29:59 EST   In a message dated 3/28/01 11:29:33 AM EST, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   > > But here, shouldn't the blame go to the player rather than the organ. =   Your > > statement that the Bach P&F was quite pleasant demonstrates the = validity of > building such instruments and using historic temperaments. But the really > > important thing to be remembers it that the instrument should be used > appropriately to it's design. It would be equally exciting to hear = the > Franck a-minor played on an instrument specifically designed to = reproduce > the > colours and sounds desired by Franck. But then, the Bach P&F would suffer. > > However, there would be a place for appropriate hearing of both = pieces. > My comment was really intended to highlight a problem (at least a problem where I am concerned) in building organs that limit the effectiveness of a =   fairly sizeable amount of the repertoire. The problem in using some = non-equal tunings, and to some extent non-eclectic stoplists is that it effectively limits what can be played well.   I am not opposed to building period-specific instruments. I think we all = can learn from those organs >however< I think the role of (say) a 17th century =   germanic-baroque instrument in (say) an Episcopal church which performs a fair amount of traditional "anglican" music by folks like Herbert Howells, =   Vaughan-Williams, and that type of music is not necessarily a good fit. In = an academic intitution, on the other hand, where the student is learning a = lot of Bach, Buxtehude, Scheidt as repertoir is perfectly valid. but Franck = just will not work in some of these situations...as it did not at the program I =   referred to earlier. The organ is excellent doing what it was designed to = do (play Bach and his contemporaries) but didn't have the resources or = tempering (tuning) to carry off the Franck (or for that matter, later in the = Evensong service that followed, Duke Ellington's "Come Sunday", which was a poor adaptation from a piano score, not very well registered, again in part due = to the lack of appropriate stops.). I just think, perhaps wrongly, that when = a church ante's up $300.000 for a new organ, that organ should be more able = to handle a broad spectrum of repertoir. (I should note that the church seems to be very happy with the = organ...these are MY opinions, and since I didn't pay for the instrument, maybe my criticisms aren't valid. but since I tune and maintain these things for a living, I do have = opiniions, never the less.)   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Big Name Organists From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 14:54:30 -0800 (PST)   THAT'S SHOWBIZ!! --- VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> wrote: > I just have a question -probably silly but here > goes. > > WHY on the news programs are never passing > theatre organists/ concert > organists obits mentioned? Even on PBS Newshour > George Wright, Gaylord > Carter, et al were never aired. Victor Borge made > the list. > Were these people invisible ? > > Rick > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/?.refer=3Dtext  
(back) Subject: Re: Bish owns a Ro(d)gers? From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 17:56:23 EST   Opus 1100 writes:   >Does anyone else on the list find it annoying that all the intelligient >folks on this list have let this mispelling go on for so long......<<   Personally, I would prefer Rogers, Allan, Hamund, Mollur, Roiter, = Cazavant, Kimbell, Shants, Pilshur and Hollkemp to the terms <toaster>, <appliance>, =   and other intentional degradations.   BTW, <mispelling> and <intelligient> are mispelt. :)     Running for cover,   Jim