PipeChat Digest #2109 - Monday, May 21, 2001
 
Re: Reger
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Matt Steinkraus" <hat77@operamail.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Rogation Sunday - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA USA  (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Reger From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 07:32:21 -0700 (PDT)   Reger could, and indeed did play his own works, particularly on the large Oberlinger an Sauer instruments in Wiesbaden and Leipzig.     --- The Schneider Family <rnjs@bwsys.net> wrote: > On Tue, 15 May 2001 22:31:28 -0400, Mike Swaldo > <mswal@adelphia.net> > > <snip> > > > Reger played, I believe, but did not perform his > big works. The > > organist he wrote for was... ummm... I can't > remember, but there > > was a guy who performed his music. > > That was Karl Straube of Hochschule fur Music > > Faithfully, > > Grandpa Arp > Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO > SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. > Pipe Organ Builders > 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 > Kenney, IL 61749-0137 > (217) 944-2454 VOX > (217) 944-2527 FAX > mailto:rnjs@bwsys.net HOME EMAIL > mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL > http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Matt Steinkraus" <hat77@operamail.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 11:46:01 -0400   Hello, I don't know if anyone remembers me, but I posted a couple of months ago = about pedaling and things, Anyway, I'm a beginning organ student and I've run = into dilemmas. When I mean beginning, though, I mean beginning. The organ is = my first keyboard instrument, I tried to get through a beginning piano book before I started playing, but about half way through it I realized how = much I disliked the pianoand got an organ instead. So now I've been playing for about 5 months, and I've worked through a beginning organ course from the seventies (Out of print). What is frustrating me is that there is a total =   lack of intermediate organ music that will facilitate the switch to a classical style . I just finished learning the Bach prelude in F (little) = but it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning books to the little preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in everyone's opinion,where should I go next? The little preludes and fugues are too difficult and = I'm also afraid to continue with anything like bach without the proper = fingerings. I have the Leupold organ book and the Gleason, but both are still a = little difficult as a starting point, so my question is, where do I go from here. = I really can't go back to the piano (I don't have one anymore), so any help would be appreciated.   Matt   ------------------------------------------- The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at http://www.opera.com/download/ -------------------------------------------    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 12:10:34 EDT   Hi Matt:   In your situation a church hymnal and learning to play hymns might be the next logical step. Brenda Durden has a unique Sunday set of hymns which she compiled and wrote. It was also the inspiration for "The Frantic Organist". Each hymn is written four ways, the tune can be found in each SAT or B and the other voices moved around accordingly.   URL: www.brendadurden@franticorganist.com   She is closing her online store, but can supply you with one of these, The Frantic Organist.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 09:21:41 -0700   Have a look at the "Tallis to Wesley" series from Oxford University Press; = the "Parish Organist" series from Concordia; "Heures Mystique" by Boellman; "L'Organiste" by Franck; "Fiori Musicali" by Frescobaldi; "The Organist" = magazine from Lorenz Publishing Co. (hush, Brewse!) ... Lorenz publishes MANY = collections for the beginning organist ... they have a website; you might also look at = the videos from Allen Organ Co. ... they're intended for organists who don't = have access to a teacher.   Cheers,   Bud-By-The-Beach   Matt Steinkraus wrote:   > Hello, > I don't know if anyone remembers me, but I posted a couple of months ago = about > pedaling and things, Anyway, I'm a beginning organ student and I've run = into > dilemmas. When I mean beginning, though, I mean beginning. The organ is = my > first keyboard instrument, I tried to get through a beginning piano book > before I started playing, but about half way through it I realized how = much I > disliked the pianoand got an organ instead. So now I've been playing = for > about 5 months, and I've worked through a beginning organ course from = the > seventies (Out of print). What is frustrating me is that there is a = total > lack of intermediate organ music that will facilitate the switch to a > classical style . I just finished learning the Bach prelude in F = (little) but > it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning books to the little > preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in everyone's opinion,where > should I go next? The little preludes and fugues are too difficult and = I'm > also afraid to continue with anything like bach without the proper = fingerings. > I have the Leupold organ book and the Gleason, but both are still a = little > difficult as a starting point, so my question is, where do I go from = here. I > really can't go back to the piano (I don't have one anymore), so any = help > would be appreciated. > > Matt > > ------------------------------------------- > The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! > Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at > http://www.opera.com/download/ > ------------------------------------------- > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 10:05:40 -0700 (PDT)   Even though you feel that the Leupold and Gleason book are dificult starting points, they are in reality excellent methods on which to build a sound organ technique. Secondly, you should study piano intensively if you really intend to become a really fine organist. You'll wish you had down the road. It makes the difference between a great organist and one with just an average technique.   Don't use the Gleason edition wih Catherine Crozier's early fingerings: They're not relevant to someone who is a beginner or in building a firm techniue that can be used in all periods of repertoire. Miss Crozier's use of those early fingerings and pedalings reflected a trend at the time of publication--and a dangerous and highly limited trend it was, too.   But please study the piano with a good teacher. It will make you the best organist and you will have a facility and sense of control over the instrument that will do you well over the years ahead. JW   --- Matt Steinkraus <hat77@operamail.com> wrote: > Hello, > I don't know if anyone remembers me, but I posted a > couple of months ago about > pedaling and things, Anyway, I'm a beginning organ > student and I've run into > dilemmas. When I mean beginning, though, I mean > beginning. The organ is my > first keyboard instrument, I tried to get through a > beginning piano book > before I started playing, but about half way through > it I realized how much I > disliked the pianoand got an organ instead. So now > I've been playing for > about 5 months, and I've worked through a beginning > organ course from the > seventies (Out of print). What is frustrating me is > that there is a total > lack of intermediate organ music that will > facilitate the switch to a > classical style . I just finished learning the Bach > prelude in F (little) but > it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning > books to the little > preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in > everyone's opinion,where > should I go next? The little preludes and fugues > are too difficult and I'm > also afraid to continue with anything like bach > without the proper fingerings. > I have the Leupold organ book and the Gleason, but > both are still a little > difficult as a starting point, so my question is, > where do I go from here. I > really can't go back to the piano (I don't have one > anymore), so any help > would be appreciated. > > Matt > > ------------------------------------------- > The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! > Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at > http://www.opera.com/download/ > ------------------------------------------- > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 13:30:29 EDT     --part1_a2.146c1336.283aaab5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/21/01 11:56:37 AM Eastern Daylight Time, hat77@operamail.com writes:     > . I just finished learning the Bach prelude in F (little) but > it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning books to the little =   > preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in everyone's opinion,where =   > should I go next?   Matt, Congratulations on your persistence. You've obviously made a good start. = My suggestion is to get the collection, "Wedding Music - Part I" published = by Concordia, and, if it is still available, "A Treasury of Early Organ = Music," edited by E Power Biggs. Both of these collections contain REAL organ literature, varying in difficulty, but certainly accessible to the = obviously vigilant student. Some highlights, off the top of my head are:   ++Wedding Music - Part I Fantasia - Johann Pachelbel Chromatic Fugue - Johann Pachelbel Air (Water Music) G F Handel (a prelude - duh.. senior moment!) - J G Walther Cantilena - Rheinberger   ++Treasure of Early Organ Music Basse et Dessus de Trompette - Clerambault Psalm XIX - B. Marcello Toccata in a-minor - Sweelinck   If you want some "goo" to play, I would also suggest getting "The Organ in =   Church" edited by Frank Asper. This has a number of accessible pieces in = it that are as useful as they are beautiful, my favorite being "Reflection" = by Frank Asper.   These three volumes can get you through months of services, weddings and funerals, or provide hours of entertainment for your elegant swareeeeee's!   Good luck, and keep on pedaling!! ;-)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_a2.146c1336.283aaab5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/21/01 11:56:37 AM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>hat77@operamail.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">. I just finished = learning the Bach prelude in F (little) but <BR>it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning books to the = little <BR>preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in everyone's = opinion,where <BR>should I go next? &nbsp;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Matt, <BR>Congratulations on your persistence. &nbsp;You've obviously made a = good start. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>My suggestion is to get the collection, "Wedding Music - Part I" = published by <BR>Concordia, and, if it is still available, "A Treasury of Early Organ = Music," <BR>edited by E Power Biggs. &nbsp;&nbsp;Both of these collections contain = REAL organ <BR>literature, varying in difficulty, but certainly accessible to the = obviously <BR>vigilant student. &nbsp;&nbsp;Some highlights, off the top of my head = are: <BR> <BR>++Wedding Music - Part I <BR>Fantasia - Johann Pachelbel <BR>Chromatic Fugue - Johann Pachelbel <BR>Air (Water Music) &nbsp;G F Handel <BR>(a prelude - duh.. senior moment!) - J G Walther <BR>Cantilena - Rheinberger <BR> <BR>++Treasure of Early Organ Music <BR>Basse et Dessus de Trompette &nbsp;- &nbsp;Clerambault <BR>Psalm XIX - &nbsp;B. Marcello <BR>Toccata in a-minor - Sweelinck <BR> <BR>If you want some "goo" to play, I would also suggest getting "The = Organ in <BR>Church" edited by Frank Asper. &nbsp;&nbsp;This has a number of = accessible pieces in it <BR>that are as useful as they are beautiful, my favorite being = "Reflection" by <BR>Frank Asper. <BR> <BR>These three volumes can get you through months of services, weddings = and <BR>funerals, or provide hours of entertainment for your elegant swareeeeee's! <BR> <BR>Good luck, and keep on pedaling!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a2.146c1336.283aaab5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 13:38:50 EDT     --part1_ea.15b5156d.283aacaa_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/21/01 12:16:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:     > "The Organist" magazine > from Lorenz Publishing Co. (hush, Brewse!) ... Lorenz publishes   I'm sorry, I can't. As a teacher, I have spent many hours undoing the damage done by students whose perception of organ music has been = compromised by the diluted and tainted arrangments of fine literature. If you must have such a volume, "The Organist's Companion" is published by the Baptist =   music people and has new music composed especially for it by such = composers as Donald Hustadt (I think that's his name). I've seen only a few = editions of this journal, and although I would not highly recommend it, I would not =   object to a student using it.   Unless Lorenz has made significant strides in improving their offerings, = my recommendation is run and run fast in the other direction. There is too much worthwhile literature out there.   At this point I will add "Eighty Chorale Preludes from the 17th and 18th Centuries" edited by Hermann Keller. I'm not nuts about wasting time learning chorale preludes, but at least these pieces are very artistically =   conceived.   One rule I'm glad I learned: Don't waste time learning music now that later on you be embarrassed to admit that you once played.   There are NO shortcuts....   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_ea.15b5156d.283aacaa_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/21/01 12:16:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">"The Organist" = magazine <BR>from Lorenz Publishing Co. (hush, Brewse!) ... Lorenz publishes = </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I'm sorry, &nbsp;&nbsp;I can't. &nbsp;&nbsp;As a teacher, I have spent = many hours undoing the <BR>damage done by students whose perception of organ music has been = compromised <BR>by the diluted and tainted arrangments of fine literature. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If you must <BR>have such a volume, "The Organist's Companion" is published by the = Baptist <BR>music people and has new music composed especially for it by such = composers <BR>as Donald Hustadt (I think that's his name). &nbsp;&nbsp;I've seen = only a few editions <BR>of this journal, and although I would not highly recommend it, I would = not <BR>object to a student using it. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Unless Lorenz has made significant strides in improving their = offerings, my <BR>recommendation is run and run fast in the other direction. = &nbsp;&nbsp;There is too <BR>much worthwhile literature out there. <BR> <BR>At this point I will add "Eighty Chorale Preludes from the 17th and = 18th <BR>Centuries" edited by Hermann Keller. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I'm not nuts = about wasting time <BR>learning chorale preludes, but at least these pieces are very = artistically <BR>conceived. <BR> <BR>One rule I'm glad I learned: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Don't waste time = learning music now that <BR>later on you be embarrassed to admit that you once played. <BR> <BR>There are NO shortcuts.... <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ea.15b5156d.283aacaa_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 10:29:27 -0700   At 11:46 5/21/2001 -0400, you wrote: >but about half way through it I realized how much I disliked the piano = and >got an organ instead. <snip>   Probably not a good move in teh grand scheme of things. Having a few = years of piano first before tackling the organ, to me anyway, is "a good thing", =   as that manic-depressive fussbudget Martha Stewart would say.   Development of a workable piano touch will aid you in later studies, especially in the French Romantic school. Developing a usable piano repertoire also couldn't hurt either, as the organ is so limited in it application other than being a "church appliance". I don't know about = you, but I've got better venues in which to make music than some religious = barn!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Rogation Sunday - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA USA (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 10:32:43 -0700   At 12:59 5/20/2001 -0700, BuuD-by-the-BeacH wrote: > the priest and people would circle the fields in the >parish, singing the Litany (and most of the Psalter). <snip>   AHA! English crop circles explained!!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 10:53:13 -0700   At 16:31 5/20/2001 -0400, you wrote: >Dear Listers and Listettes, > >My church has the opportunity to acquire an Allen Model 314 ( circa >1968). <snip>   One of the better small 3 manual Allen analogs, and reliable, too.   >1 How good ( or bad) does it really sound ? <snip>   IF properly installed and voiced, later Allen analogs can sound far better= =20 than the early MOS digitals. Installation and orientation of tone cabinets= =20 is more crucial than most non-technical (meaning pipe people) think.   >2. What kind of voicing controls are available? <snip>   Analog Allens don't have "voicing controls". Each note of each rank is an= =20 individual oscillator, and an experienced tech can voice them individually,= =20 much as with a pipe organ. This is the latest analog series, and, I=20 assume, has "Electronic Whind", which is somewhat "adjustable". Properly=20 done, this organ should sound just fine for its intended use. Problem is=20 that most pipe people treat any electronic as a "plug-in" device, which=20 they are not. Some technical expertise in installation and voicing must=20 take place for success, something that even certain Allen dealers, bent=20 more towards profit than professionalism, wouldn't do.   >3. Any other information you may have that would be helpful in >determining if we should proceed.   If this comes with Gyros, put them in your chambers (if you have any) aimed= =20 a 45=B0 angle to a hard sidewall. Never aim e-org speakers directly down= the=20 nave. If this organ includes a third channel for reeds, great; if not,=20 consider adding one. The 314 was designed for small/medium sized building= =20 requiring a three manual organ. The 50 watt power amps are rather limited,= =20 but can be replaced with more modern/powerful units by any reasonably=20 competent tech. Remember, this is basically a 4 rank (well, 3 plus a=20 c=E9l=E8ste rank to TC) organ, so you'll wind up with all the usual foibles= of=20 a heavily unified organ. Beware the "romantic chorus" tab, as this just=20 essentially throws the c=E9l=E8ste rank on top of whatever else you've got= =20 drawn, giving the organ a somewhat sea-sick sound, much like a two computer= =20 digital Allen with the "c=E9l=E8ste tuning" tabs mistakenly used in a big=20 chorus. Do not use the Gyros turning for anything but a large ensemble=20 sound, as lighter registrations will sound definitely fake.   After this, your new Crashavant will sound marvellous! The 314, it should= =20 be noted, makes an excellent practice instrument, or secondary instrument=20 for the fellowship hall or choir room or your living room.   DeserTBoB