PipeChat Digest #2110 - Monday, May 21, 2001
 
Lorenz / more stuff for Matt
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Lighted draw knobs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted)
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
studying the piano
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Lorenz / more stuff for Matt From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 11:27:24 -0700     --------------7C50EB98E7757D613D928097 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Oh, pshaw, Brewse!   I grew up on the Lorenz "Organist" magazines ... I went on to Oberlin and Cincinnati conservatories, earned a performance degree in organ, and at one time could play the entire Clavieruebung III (except for the large Vater unser, which I never quite managed), among other things.   In the meantime, in grade school and junior high school, lacking a teacher, the Lorenz stuff gave me pieces to play that were "pretty", and "easy", and kept my interest.   I know what you're referring to: the various "Made Practical" books. THOSE I wouldn't mess with, but the original compositions, particularly if you can get your hands on OLD copies of "The Organist" and "The Organ Portfolio" are FUN.   Old Ellen Jane knew what she was doing ... quite a few of her anthems turn up on my service-lists, as you well-know. She KNEW how to write for a volunteer choir of ten singers, and she KNEW how to write for amateur/beginning organists.   OH, Matt, I forgot several indispensable books:   50 Elevations - Benoit - 2 volumes The Organ In Church - Asper Organ Voluntaries - Schreiner - 2 volumes At the Console The Liturgical Organist - Carlo Rossini - MANY volumes (grin) The Practical Organist - Guilmant (the new Leupold edition) The Liturgical Organist - Guilmant (ditto)   I think all are still in print, except possibly the Schreiner.   Cheers,   Bud         Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 5/21/01 12:16:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > > >> "The Organist" magazine >> from Lorenz Publishing Co. (hush, Brewse!) ... Lorenz publishes > > I'm sorry, I can't. As a teacher, I have spent many hours undoing > the > damage done by students whose perception of organ music has been > compromised > by the diluted and tainted arrangments of fine literature. If you > must > have such a volume, "The Organist's Companion" is published by the > Baptist > music people and has new music composed especially for it by such > composers > as Donald Hustadt (I think that's his name). I've seen only a few > editions > of this journal, and although I would not highly recommend it, I would > not > object to a student using it. > > Unless Lorenz has made significant strides in improving their > offerings, my > recommendation is run and run fast in the other direction. There is > too > much worthwhile literature out there. > > At this point I will add "Eighty Chorale Preludes from the 17th and > 18th > Centuries" edited by Hermann Keller. I'm not nuts about wasting > time > learning chorale preludes, but at least these pieces are very > artistically > conceived. > > One rule I'm glad I learned: Don't waste time learning music now > that > later on you be embarrassed to admit that you once played. > > There are NO shortcuts.... > > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi > Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --------------7C50EB98E7757D613D928097 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Oh, pshaw, Brewse! <p>I grew up on the Lorenz "Organist" magazines ... I went on to Oberlin and Cincinnati conservatories, earned a performance degree in organ, and at one time could play the entire Clavieruebung III (except for the large Vater unser, which I never quite managed), among other things. <p>In the meantime, in grade school and junior high school, lacking a = teacher, the Lorenz stuff gave me pieces to play that were "pretty", and "easy", and kept my interest. <p>I know what you're referring to: the various "Made Practical" books. THOSE I wouldn't mess with, but the original compositions, particularly if you can get your hands on OLD copies of "The Organist" and "The Organ Portfolio" are FUN. <p>Old Ellen Jane knew what she was doing ... quite a few of her anthems turn up on my service-lists, as you well-know. She KNEW how to write for a volunteer choir of ten singers, and she KNEW how to write for = amateur/beginning organists. <p>OH, Matt, I forgot several indispensable books: <p>50 Elevations - Benoit - 2 volumes <br>The Organ In Church - Asper <br>Organ Voluntaries - Schreiner - 2 volumes <br>At the Console <br>The Liturgical Organist - Carlo Rossini - MANY volumes (grin) <br>The Practical Organist - Guilmant (the new Leupold edition) <br>The Liturgical Organist - Guilmant (ditto) <p>I think all are still in print, except possibly the Schreiner. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <p>Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 5/21/01 12:16:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>quilisma@socal.rr.com = writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>"The Organist" magazine</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>from Lorenz Publishing = Co. (hush, Brewse!) ... Lorenz publishes</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>I'm = sorry,&nbsp;&nbsp; I can't.&nbsp;&nbsp; As a teacher, I have spent many hours undoing = the</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>damage = done by students whose perception of organ music has been = compromised</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>by the = diluted and tainted arrangments of fine literature.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If you = must</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>have such = a volume, "The Organist's Companion" is published by the = Baptist</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>music = people and has new music composed especially for it by such = composers</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>as Donald = Hustadt (I think that's his name).&nbsp;&nbsp; I've seen only a few = editions</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>of this = journal, and although I would not highly recommend it, I would = not</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>object to = a student using it.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Unless = Lorenz has made significant strides in improving their offerings, = my</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>recommendation is run and run fast in the other direction.&nbsp;&nbsp; There is = too</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>much = worthwhile literature out there.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>At this = point I will add "Eighty Chorale Preludes from the 17th and = 18th</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>Centuries" edited by Hermann Keller.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I'm not nuts about wasting = time</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>learning = chorale preludes, but at least these pieces are very = artistically</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>conceived.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>One rule = I'm glad I learned:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Don't waste time learning music now = that</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>later on = you be embarrassed to admit that you once played.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>There are = NO shortcuts....</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Bruce = Cornely&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ~&nbsp; Cremona502@cs.com</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>with the = Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!"</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Visit = Howling Acres at&nbsp;&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/">http://members.tripod.com/Bru= con502/</A></font></font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------7C50EB98E7757D613D928097--    
(back) Subject: Re: Lighted draw knobs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 11:07:08 -0700   At 19:48 5/20/2001 -0400, you wrote: >I really hate to see good people >get taken, it just goes against my grain.<snip>   "Taking people" is a basic precept of American business these days, large and small. There are numerous "organ cobblers" out there that take advantage of churches and organists, when just a little education, as Ron aptly provided, would foil their attempts. In the post-RayGun "greed = based society", it's necessary to micro-manage your business contacts to a certain degree in order to keep from getting your bank account vacuumed. Of course, auto repair shops are probably the most visible example of this greed based business philosophy. How many of you have = paid for a "tune up" on your post-1975 car that has electronic ignition? Most cars built after the 1980s only require spark plug changes at 30K miles (100K with platinum plugs) and replacement of spark leads and distributor caps only as needed, usually not before 100K miles. If you've paid for "tune ups", you've been had, much as by the organ cobbler who's changing out your drawknobs, most probably with a used one stolen from another = customer.   Caveat emptor.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 11:30:07 -0700   At 13:38 5/21/2001 -0400, BaLWd-OnE bReWsE wrote: >Unless Lorenz has made significant strides in improving their offerings, >my recommendation is run and run fast in the other direction. There is >too much worthwhile literature out there. <snip>   From what I've seen, which isn't too much, they haven't. It's the same, tasteless, useless dri-VELL they've been flogging for decades. I honestly =   can't recall one decent piece of music that ever wore the Lorenz label. There are no short cuts to good music, as bReWsE points out.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 15:21:53 EDT   Hey Matt-   I'm an early intermediate organist, and one book I have found = indispensable is Roger E. Davis's "The Organ Method." Similar to Gleason but superior = IMHO, it has pedal and hand coordination exercises, pieces for manuals alone and =   for manuals + pedals, etc etc. I used this book extensively through my = first semester, and found I could play several of the pieces after a couple of weeks. Also, KEEP UP THE BACH! My teacher has told me several times that = the Little Preludes and Fugues contain every problem you will find in Bach's music, and therefore they are one of the best teaching tools for a = beginner organist. Try the G Minor prelude next, it's much easier than the F Major = and allows you to get a feel for reading three lines and switching melodies between left and right hands.   Keep up the good work!! Mandy  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: 21 May 2001 20:02 GMT   >----- Urspr=FCngliche Nachricht ----- >Absender: AMADPoet@aol.com >Betreff: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas >Empf=E4nger: pipechat@pipechat.org >Datum: 21. Mai 2001 21:21     >Also, KEEP UP THE BACH!   That is very true!   > My teacher has told me several times that the=20 > Little Preludes and Fugues contain every problem you will > find in Bach's music   As much as I love the Little Preludes: that is (my personal opinion) n o t true!!!   Good luck, and keep up playing the piano, and develop as much piano technique skills (and a piano repertoire, musically!) as you can. That is even more important that thinking about what value the Little Preludes an Fugues have for you. BTW:=20 Take the "Orgelbuechlein". For me it is t h e=20 JSBach-concentrate.   Felix=20          
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 16:06:31 -0400   when I was studying with Diane, she told me to study the music of the = French Romantic composers (Widor, Vierne, Mulet, etc), because their pieces are great workouts for both the manuals and the pedals. Of course, she's a little bias, because she studied those works as well. They ARE = wonderful....   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted) From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 16:04:49 -0400   Dear Bob, From the mouth of the oracle. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 21, 2001 1:53 PM Subject: Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted)     > At 16:31 5/20/2001 -0400, you wrote: > >Dear Listers and Listettes, > > > >My church has the opportunity to acquire an Allen Model 314 ( circa > >1968). <snip> > > One of the better small 3 manual Allen analogs, and reliable, too. > > >1 How good ( or bad) does it really sound ? <snip> > > IF properly installed and voiced, later Allen analogs can sound far bet= ter > than the early MOS digitals. Installation and orientation of tone cabinets > is more crucial than most non-technical (meaning pipe people) think. > > >2. What kind of voicing controls are available? <snip> > > Analog Allens don't have "voicing controls". Each note of each rank is= an > individual oscillator, and an experienced tech can voice them individually, > much as with a pipe organ. This is the latest analog series, and, I > assume, has "Electronic Whind", which is somewhat "adjustable". Proper= ly > done, this organ should sound just fine for its intended use. Problem = is > that most pipe people treat any electronic as a "plug-in" device, which > they are not. Some technical expertise in installation and voicing mus= t > take place for success, something that even certain Allen dealers, bent > more towards profit than professionalism, wouldn't do. > > >3. Any other information you may have that would be helpful in > >determining if we should proceed. > > If this comes with Gyros, put them in your chambers (if you have any) aimed > a 45=B0 angle to a hard sidewall. Never aim e-org speakers directly do= wn the > nave. If this organ includes a third channel for reeds, great; if not, > consider adding one. The 314 was designed for small/medium sized build= ing > requiring a three manual organ. The 50 watt power amps are rather limited, > but can be replaced with more modern/powerful units by any reasonably > competent tech. Remember, this is basically a 4 rank (well, 3 plus a > c=E9l=E8ste rank to TC) organ, so you'll wind up with all the usual foi= bles of > a heavily unified organ. Beware the "romantic chorus" tab, as this jus= t > essentially throws the c=E9l=E8ste rank on top of whatever else you've = got > drawn, giving the organ a somewhat sea-sick sound, much like a two computer > digital Allen with the "c=E9l=E8ste tuning" tabs mistakenly used in a b= ig > chorus. Do not use the Gyros turning for anything but a large ensemble > sound, as lighter registrations will sound definitely fake. > > After this, your new Crashavant will sound marvellous! The 314, it sho= uld > be noted, makes an excellent practice instrument, or secondary instrume= nt > for the fellowship hall or choir room or your living room. > > DeserTBoB > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 13:09:57 -0700   At 16:06 5/21/2001 -0400, you wrote: >because their pieces are great workouts for both the manuals and the >pedals. <snip>   If there was ever an argument for piano study before organ study, the French Romantic school is it. A "pianistic touch" is not only desirable but necessary in many of these works. Widor's Symphonies are but one = example.   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 13:13:29 -0700   At 16:04 5/21/2001 -0400, you wrote: >Dear Bob, > From the mouth of the oracle. <snip>     "JIM!!! DON'T TOUCH THE ORACLE!!" <bbzzzap!> Ooops, too late...    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 16:31:37 -0400   > >If there was ever an argument for piano study before organ study, >the French Romantic school is it. A "pianistic touch" is not only >desirable but necessary in many of these works. Widor's Symphonies >are but one example. > >dB >   Could you elaborate somewhat on this? Do you mean a non-legato touch?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 17:54:11 -0400   Hi, Matt-- Read your posting. I was curious: Are you working with an organ = teacher? I, too, play the organ.......but know very little about the = instrument, actually. I've had quite a few years of piano: that's what gets me = through. Pedaling and registration? I'm out to lunch on those. I do not want to = "invest" in a teacher, at this point. So, I struggle on alone. Was curious: what edition of the Gleason book do you have? I, = too, was able to get this book for a good price.......so I did. Are you planning = to sort of work through this book, yourself? I have the sixth edition. In response to your questions, I don't know of any organ books to recommend. I'm sure you'll get some responses from the list, though. Good luck! -Jane Hanudel     Matt Steinkraus wrote:   > Hello, > I don't know if anyone remembers me, but I posted a couple of months ago = about > pedaling and things, Anyway, I'm a beginning organ student and I've run = into > dilemmas. When I mean beginning, though, I mean beginning. The organ is = my > first keyboard instrument, I tried to get through a beginning piano book > before I started playing, but about half way through it I realized how = much I > disliked the pianoand got an organ instead. So now I've been playing = for > about 5 months, and I've worked through a beginning organ course from = the > seventies (Out of print). What is frustrating me is that there is a = total > lack of intermediate organ music that will facilitate the switch to a > classical style . I just finished learning the Bach prelude in F = (little) but > it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning books to the little > preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in everyone's opinion,where > should I go next? The little preludes and fugues are too difficult and = I'm > also afraid to continue with anything like bach without the proper = fingerings. > I have the Leupold organ book and the Gleason, but both are still a = little > difficult as a starting point, so my question is, where do I go from = here. I > really can't go back to the piano (I don't have one anymore), so any = help > would be appreciated. > > Matt > > ------------------------------------------- > The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! > Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at > http://www.opera.com/download/ > ------------------------------------------- > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 18:01:08 -0400   Mr. Williams, Hi.............was interested in what you wrote about the Gleason book. Which edition has those fingerings of Catherine Crozier? I have the sixth edition, and, too, am very much a beginner in studying the organ.........by myself! Thanx in advance for your reply! -Jane Hanudel   > Even athough you feel that the Leupold and Gleason book > are dificult starting points, they are in reality > excellent methods on which to build a sound organ > technique. Secondly, you should study piano > intensively if you really intend to become a really > fine organist. You'll wish you had down the road. It > makes the difference between a great organist and one > with just an average technique. > > Don't use the Gleason edition wih Catherine Crozier's > early fingerings: They're not relevant to someone who > is a beginner or in building a firm techniue that can > be used in all periods of repertoire. Miss Crozier's > use of those early fingerings and pedalings reflected > a trend at the time of publication--and a dangerous > and highly limited trend it was, too. > > But please study the piano with a good teacher. It > will make you the best organist and you will have a > facility and sense of control over the instrument that > will do you well over the years ahead. > JW > > --- Matt Steinkraus <hat77@operamail.com> wrote: > > Hello, > > I don't know if anyone remembers me, but I posted a > > couple of months ago about > > pedaling and things, Anyway, I'm a beginning organ > > student and I've run into > > dilemmas. When I mean beginning, though, I mean > > beginning. The organ is my > > first keyboard instrument, I tried to get through a > > beginning piano book > > before I started playing, but about half way through > > it I realized how much I > > disliked the pianoand got an organ instead. So now > > I've been playing for > > about 5 months, and I've worked through a beginning > > organ course from the > > seventies (Out of print). What is frustrating me is > > that there is a total > > lack of intermediate organ music that will > > facilitate the switch to a > > classical style . I just finished learning the Bach > > prelude in F (little) but > > it was a heck of a learning curve,from the beginning > > books to the little > > preludes and fugues, even the easiest one.So in > > everyone's opinion,where > > should I go next? The little preludes and fugues > > are too difficult and I'm > > also afraid to continue with anything like bach > > without the proper fingerings. > > I have the Leupold organ book and the Gleason, but > > both are still a little > > difficult as a starting point, so my question is, > > where do I go from here. I > > really can't go back to the piano (I don't have one > > anymore), so any help > > would be appreciated. > > > > Matt > > > > ------------------------------------------- > > The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! > > Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at > > http://www.opera.com/download/ > > ------------------------------------------- > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > > organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices > http://auctions.yahoo.com/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 18:06:34 EDT   In a message dated 5/21/01 12:06:54 PM Central Daylight Time, jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com writes:   << Don't use the Gleason edition wih Catherine Crozier's early fingerings: They're not relevant to someone who is a beginner or in building a firm techniue that can be used in all periods of repertoire. >>   Hey JW- I don't normally use fingerings provided in any music, but out of curiosity which edition of Gleason are you referring to?   Mandy  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 18:28:11 EDT   All of the music popping up in this thread brings a question to mind- what =   are the better publishers of the major organ works? I've been running into = a lot of "simplified" music lately and it's really starting to bug me. Is = the best bet to find a "Urtext" edition of a work, or is that term being used more loosely than it once was?   Mandy  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 18:30:45 EDT   In a message dated 5/21/01 3:03:42 PM Central Daylight Time, Hell-Felix@t-online.de writes:   << > My teacher has told me several times that the > Little Preludes and Fugues contain every problem you will > find in Bach's music As much as I love the Little Preludes: that is (my personal opinion) n o t true!!! >>   Maybe because most of us find new problems every time we sit down to play Bach's music? ;;;;o)   Mandy  
(back) Subject: studying the piano From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 15:37:46 -0700   I started piano at age five, and by age nine I had decided I wanted to play the organ. My piano teacher's condition was that I continue to study piano ... she was also an organist.   So I kept up the piano, rather half-heartedly, through high school. When I went to conservatory, I wanted to take harpsichord as a minor, but they insisted on more piano.   I wish NOW, from the perspective of nearly fifty years later, that I'd applied myself more diligently to the piano. As others have mentioned, the French Romantic organ repertoire in particular requires a FORMIDABLE pianistic technique. I played that repertoire, but it always took me longer to get it under my fingers.   Now, after four years of playing a Hammond organ with a very light touch, I've had to go back to the piano again to build up my strength.   Cheers,   Bud-By-The-Beach