PipeChat Digest #2111 - Monday, May 21, 2001
 
A FANTASTIC NEW ORGAN CD  x post
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: A FANTASTIC NEW ORGAN CD  x post
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: A FANTASTIC NEW ORGAN CD  x post
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: studying the piano
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Easy Bach, historical fingerings and other dilemmas.
  by "Matt Steinkraus" <hat77@operamail.com>
Re: studying the piano
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: A FANTASTIC NEW ORGAN CD x post From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 18:51:04 EDT     --part1_be.14e029b3.283af5d8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   I would like to take this opportunity to commend a very fine artist (and = a=3D20 good friend) on his newest CD recording, recently released from the = Organ=3D20 Stop Pizza in Mesa, AZ.   "Give My Regards To Broadway" was recently released with organist Lew=3D20 Williams at the console of the 4 manual Mighty Wurlitzer theatre pipe = organ.=3D =3D20 The playing is outstanding, actually- the playing is what is to be = expected=3D20 from Lew. It is exciting, melodies and modulations are beautifully = woven=3D20 together and one hears quite a vast variety of the tonal resources of = the=3D20 Mesa Wurlitzer. It is interesting that Lew takes these arrangements = and=3D20 performs them as they were originally conceived and heard. Very = listenable=3D20 music indeed. I have Lew's other recordings as well and this latest = is=3D20 certainly a welcome addition to my CD collection (which is beginning to = run=3D20 me out of house and home!) In contrast to his "Rhapsody in Blue," = also=3D20 released on the Mesa instrument a few years back, I find the = microphone=3D20 placement in this "Broadway" recording superior in that the organ has a = huge=3D =3D20 "spread" of sound and incredible depth. The richness of tone, especially = in=3D =3D20 the tibia/string/vox choruses is unsurpassed compared with most other = theatr=3D e=3D20 organ recordings I have heard personally.   The repertoire contained on the CD is as follows:   1. Give My Regards to Broadway (Cohan) 2. Singin' In the Rain (Freed/Brown) 3. Stardust (Carmichael) 4. Take Me Out To the Ballgame (Norworth/VonTilzer) 5. Dr. Zhivago Theme Music (Jarre) 6. Opus One (Garris/Oliver) 7. Lullaby (Gershwin) 8. Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy (Raye/Price) 9. Don't Cry For Me, Argentina (Webber) 10. Little Brown Jug (Winner) 11. Theme to Somewhere In Time (Barry) w/ 18th Variation: Theme of = Paganini 12. Stompin' At the Savoy (Razaf/Goodman/Sampson/Webb) 13. The Lord's Prayer (Mallotte) 14. Medley from The Sound of Music (Rodgers/Hammerstein)   I especially like the way he does not abuse the percussions as many = other=3D20 pizza organ recordings have done. Bravo Lew! To those of us who know = him=3D20 well- one can really hear and feel his personality coming through = these=3D20 melodies! If your ATOS chapter or club hasn't had Lew play for you = in=3D20 awhile, what are you waiting for???? His playing only gets better each = time=3D =3D20 I hear him.   In addition, Lew played a wonderful concert at the Senate Theatre this = past=3D20 Saturday night. The Senate is the home of the Detroit Theatre Organ = Society=3D =3D20 and home of the 4/34 Mighty Wurlitzer "Concert Organ" built in 1928 = and=3D20 originally installed in the Fisher Theatre on Grand Boulevard. Lew = once=3D20 again pleased his audience with popular tunes and ballads that took = the=3D20 Wurlitzer through its paces (and some it probably didn't even know it = had!)=3D20=3D =3D20 It always amazes me to see a musician of Lew's calibre at an = instrument=3D20 familiar to me personally. I love learning what I can from others = regarding=3D =3D20 registration and style. The organ really sounded fine as was the playing. = =3D20   I did have the wonderful opportunity to bring Lew back to the Shrine to = see=3D20 the Grand Kilgen organ on Friday night after his practice at the theatre = and=3D =3D20 dinner. The last time he was there was August 1998 and I had just started = m=3D y=3D20 tenure the previous month. Only the main Swell, Great, Choir and part of = th=3D e=3D20 pedal was working. The downstairs console was gutted and being = retrofitted=3D20 with solid state and only its shell sat downstairs in the Sanctuary. As = a=3D20 result Lew had to hear what worked of the organ from the upstairs = gallery=3D20 which is right in the middle of the 4 main chambers and definitely NOT = the=3D20 place to hear this organ from. This time all of the instrument played = and=3D20 Lew got to hear it and play it from the downstairs (antiphonal) console- = fro=3D m=3D20 which one can really hear and enjoy the sounds of the organ in the room. To=3D o=3D20 bad that more instruments don't give an organist that option. I think he = wa=3D s=3D20 most pleased with the instrument. It was very late (about 1:30 am) and = we=3D20 were both rather fatigued. I will let Lew contribute his own thinking = about=3D =3D20 the Kilgen and the unique facilities that Fr. Charles Coughlin left = behind=3D20 for present and future generations. (OK Lew- get busy typing!) hehehe = =3D20=3D =3D3Do)   It really has been a fine weekend of music between Lew, the new CD and = the=3D20 Senate Wurlitzer (and 2 funerals, 4 weddings, 6 weekend Liturgies,=3D20 Baccalaureate Mass and graduation exercises for Shrine high school!) =3D20   <yawn> back to bed for more well deserved rest. BRAVO again Lew!!!   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_be.14e029b3.283af5d8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">I would like to take = this oppo=3D rtunity to commend a very fine artist (and a=3D20 <BR>good friend) on his newest CD recording, recently released from the = Orga=3D n=3D20 <BR>Stop Pizza in Mesa, AZ. <BR> <BR>"Give My Regards To Broadway" was recently released with organist = Lew=3D20 <BR>Williams at the console of the 4 manual Mighty Wurlitzer theatre pipe = or=3D gan. &nbsp; <BR>The playing is outstanding, actually- the playing is what is to be = expec=3D ted=3D20 <BR>from Lew. &nbsp;It is exciting, melodies and modulations are = beautifully=3D woven=3D20 <BR>together and one hears quite a vast variety of the tonal resources of = th=3D e=3D20 <BR>Mesa Wurlitzer. &nbsp;It is interesting that Lew takes these = arrangement=3D s and=3D20 <BR>performs them as they were originally conceived and heard. &nbsp;Very = li=3D stenable=3D20 <BR>music indeed. &nbsp;I have Lew's other recordings as well and this = lates=3D t is=3D20 <BR>certainly a welcome addition to my CD collection (which is beginning = to=3D20=3D run=3D20 <BR>me out of house and home!) &nbsp;In contrast to his "Rhapsody in = Blue,"=3D20=3D also=3D20 <BR>released on the Mesa instrument a few years back, I find the = microphone=3D20 <BR>placement in this "Broadway" recording superior in that the organ has = a=3D20=3D huge=3D20 <BR>"spread" of sound and incredible depth. &nbsp;The richness of tone, = espe=3D cially in=3D20 <BR>the tibia/string/vox choruses is unsurpassed compared with most other = th=3D eatre=3D20 <BR>organ recordings I have heard personally. <BR> <BR>The repertoire contained on the CD is as follows: <BR> <BR>1. &nbsp;Give My Regards to Broadway (Cohan) <BR>2. Singin' In the Rain (Freed/Brown) <BR>3. Stardust (Carmichael) <BR>4. Take Me Out To the Ballgame (Norworth/VonTilzer) <BR>5. Dr. Zhivago Theme Music (Jarre) <BR>6. Opus One (Garris/Oliver) <BR>7. Lullaby (Gershwin) <BR>8. Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy (Raye/Price) <BR>9. Don't Cry For Me, Argentina (Webber) <BR>10. Little Brown Jug (Winner) <BR>11. Theme to Somewhere In Time (Barry) w/ 18th Variation: Theme of = Pagan=3D ini <BR>12. Stompin' At the Savoy (Razaf/Goodman/Sampson/Webb) <BR>13. The Lord's Prayer (Mallotte) <BR>14. Medley from The Sound of Music (Rodgers/Hammerstein) <BR> <BR>I especially like the way he does not abuse the percussions as many = othe=3D r=3D20 <BR>pizza organ recordings have done. &nbsp;Bravo Lew! To those of us who = kn=3D ow him=3D20 <BR>well- one can really hear and feel his personality coming through = these=3D20 <BR>melodies! &nbsp;If your ATOS chapter or club hasn't had Lew play for = you=3D in=3D20 <BR>awhile, what are you waiting for???? &nbsp;His playing only gets = better=3D20=3D each time=3D20 <BR>I hear him. <BR> <BR>In addition, Lew played a wonderful concert at the Senate Theatre this = p=3D ast=3D20 <BR>Saturday night. &nbsp;The Senate is the home of the Detroit Theatre = Orga=3D n Society=3D20 <BR>and home of the &nbsp;4/34 Mighty Wurlitzer "Concert Organ" built in = 192=3D 8 and=3D20 <BR>originally installed in the Fisher Theatre on Grand Boulevard. = &nbsp;Lew=3D once=3D20 <BR>again pleased his audience with popular tunes and ballads that took = the=3D20 <BR>Wurlitzer through its paces (and some it probably didn't even know it = ha=3D d!) &nbsp; <BR>It always amazes me to see a musician of Lew's calibre at an = instrument=3D20 <BR>familiar to me personally. &nbsp;I love learning what I can from = others=3D20=3D regarding=3D20 <BR>registration and style. &nbsp;The organ really sounded fine as was the = p=3D laying. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>I did have the wonderful opportunity to bring Lew back to the Shrine = to=3D20=3D see=3D20 <BR>the Grand Kilgen organ on Friday night after his practice at the = theatre=3D and=3D20 <BR>dinner. &nbsp;The last time he was there was August 1998 and I had = just=3D20=3D started my=3D20 <BR>tenure the previous month. &nbsp;Only the main Swell, Great, Choir and = p=3D art of the=3D20 <BR>pedal was working. &nbsp;The downstairs console was gutted and being = ret=3D rofitted=3D20 <BR>with solid state and only its shell sat downstairs in the Sanctuary. = &nb=3D sp;As a=3D20 <BR>result Lew had to hear what worked of the organ from the upstairs = galler=3D y=3D20 <BR>which is right in the middle of the 4 main chambers and definitely NOT = t=3D he=3D20 <BR>place to hear this organ from. &nbsp;This time all of the instrument = pla=3D yed and=3D20 <BR>Lew got to hear it and play it from the downstairs (antiphonal) = console-=3D from=3D20 <BR>which one can really hear and enjoy the sounds of the organ in the = room.=3D &nbsp;Too=3D20 <BR>bad that more instruments don't give an organist that option. &nbsp;I = th=3D ink he was=3D20 <BR>most pleased with the instrument. &nbsp;It was very late (about 1:30 = am)=3D and we=3D20 <BR>were both rather fatigued. &nbsp;I will let Lew contribute his own = think=3D ing about=3D20 <BR>the Kilgen and the unique facilities that Fr. Charles Coughlin left = behi=3D nd=3D20 <BR>for present and future generations. &nbsp;(OK Lew- get busy typing!) = &nb=3D sp;hehehe &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D3Do) <BR> <BR>It really has been a fine weekend of music between Lew, the new CD and = t=3D he=3D20 <BR>Senate Wurlitzer (and 2 funerals, 4 weddings, 6 weekend = Liturgies,=3D20 <BR>Baccalaureate Mass and graduation exercises for Shrine high school!) = &nb=3D sp; <BR> <BR>&lt;yawn&gt; back to bed for more well deserved rest. &nbsp;BRAVO = again=3D20=3D Lew!!! <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_be.14e029b3.283af5d8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: A FANTASTIC NEW ORGAN CD x post From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 19:40:06 EDT   Hi Scott:   Which Lew do you mean?   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 19:53:18 EDT   Hi Mandy:   I believe Jack was referring to Gleason ed. 8 or 9. Urtext refers usually to un edited music with little or no registrational markings and no fingering added. C. F. Peters was noted for that. Bach is always one to make organists think, and rethink at the keyboard. The music must have just flowed right off his pen, one musicologist estimated an out put 28 pages a month. Mozart of course was even faster, having less time alloted to him. He wrote several pages a day, and never crossed things out or made any significant changes in his music. It was perfect right from his head to his hand, composed perfectly. What a mind he had!   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: A FANTASTIC NEW ORGAN CD x post From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 20:35:40 EDT     --part1_ff.69b0afb.283b0e5c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   In a message dated 5/21/01 7:41:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=3D20 RonSeverin@aol.com writes:     >=3D20   Lew Williams   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_ff.69b0afb.283b0e5c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated = 5/21/01 7:4=3D 1:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=3D20 <BR>RonSeverin@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Ar=3D ial" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Which Lew do you = mean</BLOC=3D KQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D3D"Comic=3D Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR>Lew Williams <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_ff.69b0afb.283b0e5c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: studying the piano From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 20:21:34 -0500   Personally, I find a player piano much easier to play....tho I DO play a nice piano besides. <g>   Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, historical fingerings and other dilemmas. From: "Matt Steinkraus" <hat77@operamail.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 22:04:44 -0400   Thanks for all the ideas,   It should be said though, that I do have an organ teacher, problem is, = he's more into theatre style stuff and jazz. I want to find somebody to teach = me classical technique etc.as well as keeping with the theatre stuff (I = really do like theatre organs). If you guys know anybody within the Sacramento, California area who would like a good organ student drop me a line.I was thinking about college classes, but even the local UC doesn't have any = organ teachers.   My second question is directed to all the lutherans out there. I go to a Missouri synod church and play bass in the "Praze BaNd" which thoughouly demoralizes me, by the way (Vacuous stuff, that contemporary junk) anyway, = if any of you've ever looked at the standard blue hymnal, you probably know = that a lot of those arrangements are rather abominable. Does anyone know of a companion to this, maybe something written for organ? I'm actually = thinking about playing for the traditional service, and I fear I would have to = arrange my own music If I was going to play with pedals, which is the only way I'd = do it (Current pianist plays the organ with the bass octavizer on, it's an Allen).   Last, I'm leaving for germany tommorrow, followed by italy and france. = I'll be in Ulm (I'm seeing the munster organ!). If anybody wants to give me = some ideas about what instruments to see, I'd be much obliged. Besides Ulm, = I'll probably be in Stuttgart, Florence, Venice, Rome and Paris. There's gotta = be something around there to see eh? ;> Also, is it possible just to walk up = and say "Can I see the organ?" without getting weird looks? I missed a good = number of places last time I was in europe because of illness... so now would be = a good time.   Thanks Again, Matt   ------------------------------------------- The Fastest Browser on Earth now for FREE!! Download Opera 5 for Windows now! Get it at http://www.opera.com/download/ -------------------------------------------    
(back) Subject: Re: studying the piano From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 23:50:26 EDT   Bud, you're absolutely right. When I was at Juilliard they insisted that = all pianists have an instrument away from the keyboard, and that all instrumentalists and vocalists have piano experience. Never give it up. Mozart and Clementi are really good technique builders, = to say nothing of Bach, of course. I'm not sure that playing tons of = Scriabin or Rachmaninoff will help with organ playing, but strength, agility, and = the CONTROL needed in piano technique is especially helpful for organists, whether they are playing electropneumatic or mechanical action organs. Learning one's fingerings and voice leading on the piano is great for = MUSIC MAKING on the organ, too. Another good tip: listen to CHAMBER MUSIC = often. It will help you learn to be a musician.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu> Date: Tue, 22 May 2001 00:22:35 -0400   I inject myself in this discussion, knowing full well that many or most of you will disagree with me, but I must say my piece.   Nearly everyone in posting to this particular discussion has argued that developing piano technique (and repertoire) is vital to developing good organ technique. If you will, please indulge me. . .   How many french horn players do you know who have been told that they must develop technique and repertoire on the trumpet in order to be a good horn player? How many double bassists are told to practice their 'cello, otherwise they'll never be any good? Saxophone and clarinet, recorder and tin whistle, etc.   These pairs of instruments are far more similar to each other in terms of specialized techniques to the instrument with which it was paired than are the piano and the organ. Yes, they both have keyboards, but as we so often remind others, that is where the similarities *end*. I will concede that piano practice is very useful in *some* areas of the repertoire (I do most of my early practicing for 19th and 20th century music on the piano). However, I had (and still do, from a solo perspective) a laughably small piano repertoire. My piano technique and repertoire have both been developed through accompanying, which I began long after organ study.   I am in no way arguing that I am a great organist; that is for others to judge. However, my organ repertoire does contain quite a few "hard songs" and in learning them, I have not at all been impeded by my lack of piano repertoire (and technique). For me, it is totally irrelevant.   Some will choose to develop their organ technique at the piano. If that works, fine. If it doesn't work (for any reason, including that one wishes not to play the piano), then by all means, develop organ technique at the organ! That does make sense, doesn't it?   -Stephen Karr    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 22 May 2001 00:36:29 EDT     --part1_a4.1472bc41.283b46cd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/21/01 2:03:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:     > Probably not a good move in teh grand scheme of things. Having a few = years > of piano first before tackling the organ, to me anyway, is "a good = thing", > as that manic-depressive fussbudget Martha Stewart would say. > >   As one of my teachers used to say: PEOPLE, PEOPLE, PEOPLE!!   You are not listening to the nice man. He discovered he DOES NOT like = the piano and wants to learn to play the organ. It is quite possible and = just as easy to learn to read music and operate up-and-down-keyboard = projectiles on the organ as on the piano. If someone does not like playing the = piano, chances are they're not going to practice as much and will therefore = progress more slowly. I did not play piano literature (except for brief study = with a fine concert pianist who said, "Don't quit playing the organ, just learn =   this piano music for fun." (I worked on Debussy and Mendelssohn with = him) until I was in my 30s and then only because I began teaching piano and thought it might be nice to be able to play some literature for the kids. = Lo and behold, it was fun and I grew to enjoy playing the piano for = pleasure. During college studies my teacher noted some deficiencies in my = technique and recommended some Pischna and Hanon studies on the piano. I did it because there was a good reason to do it, and that was to help me play the =   organ better.   Had I been forced to give up the organ until I was proficient on the = piano, I would probably not be an organist today. As I told/tell parents who ask what the "best" age is to start their children on the piano (or any = musical instrument), the best time is when they are interested and want to do it.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_a4.1472bc41.283b46cd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/21/01 2:03:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>desertbob@rglobal.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Probably not a = good move in teh grand scheme of things. &nbsp;Having a few years <BR>of piano first before tackling the organ, to me anyway, is "a good = thing", <BR>as that manic-depressive fussbudget Martha Stewart would say. <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>As one of my teachers used to say: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;PEOPLE, PEOPLE, = PEOPLE!! <BR> <BR>You are not listening to the nice man. &nbsp;&nbsp;He discovered he = DOES NOT like the <BR>piano and wants to learn to play the organ. &nbsp;&nbsp;It is quite = possible and just <BR>as easy to learn to read music and operate up-and-down-keyboard = projectiles <BR>on the organ as on the piano. &nbsp;&nbsp;If someone does not like = playing the piano, <BR>chances are they're not going to practice as much and will therefore = progress <BR>more slowly. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I did not play piano literature = (except for brief study with <BR>a fine concert pianist who said, "Don't quit playing the organ, just = learn <BR>this piano music for fun." &nbsp;&nbsp;(I worked on Debussy and = Mendelssohn with him) <BR>until I was in my 30s and then only because I began teaching piano and =   <BR>thought it might be nice to be able to play some literature for the = kids. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>Lo and behold, it was fun and I grew to enjoy playing the piano for = pleasure. <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;During college studies my teacher noted some deficiencies in my technique <BR>and recommended some Pischna and Hanon studies on the piano. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I did it <BR>because there was a good reason to do it, and that was to help me play = the <BR>organ better. <BR> <BR>Had I been forced to give up the organ until I was proficient on the = piano, I <BR>would probably not be an organist today. &nbsp;&nbsp;As I told/tell = parents who ask <BR>what the "best" age is to start their children on the piano (or any = musical <BR>instrument), the best time is when they are interested and want to do = it. <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a4.1472bc41.283b46cd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Model 314 (Cross Posted) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 22 May 2001 00:39:59 EDT     --part1_f2.a6f3b36.283b479f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/21/01 2:06:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:     > Installation and orientation of tone cabinets > is more crucial than most non-technical (meaning pipe people) think. >   PPPTTTHHHHHBBBBBBBPPPTTTTHHH!!! "Pipe people" generally are more aware of the importance of proper = placement than most electroditoid installation and sales people, to whom = installation is not much more than cutting the price tag off of the power cord and = handing you a can of Pledge and a rag to keep the console shiny. Speaker placement is often as critical as pipe placement. We pipe people DO = know these things. ;-)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_f2.a6f3b36.283b479f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/21/01 2:06:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>desertbob@rglobal.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Installation and = orientation of tone cabinets <BR>is more crucial than most non-technical (meaning pipe people) think. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>PPPTTTHHHHHBBBBBBBPPPTTTTHHH!!! <BR>"Pipe people" generally are more aware of the importance of proper = placement <BR>than most electroditoid installation and sales people, to whom = installation <BR>is not much more than cutting the price tag off of the power cord and = handing <BR>you a can of Pledge and a rag to keep the console shiny. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Speaker <BR>placement is often as critical as pipe placement. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;We = pipe people DO know <BR>these things. <BR>;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f2.a6f3b36.283b479f_boundary--