PipeChat Digest #2128 - Tuesday, May 29, 2001
 
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Choir Size - was: Service List -  Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Choir Size - was: Service List -  Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Choir Size
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Choir Size - was: Service List -  Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Choir numbers & American Organs
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com>
Re: Choir Size and Configuration
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Youth in the Choir (was Choir Size)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 03:22:31 -0700 (PDT)   No it wasn't Pogerelich who passed away, but some other young Russian pianist who made a big hit in the 80's.   --- AMADPoet@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 5/28/01 7:53:01 PM Central > Daylight Time, > jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com writes: > > << I heard that Pogerelich passed away. Is that > true? >> > > Oh God, I hope not. The last I heard he cancelled > his concerts for the next > year- after the death of his wife and then his > father he was diagnosed with > nervous depression, which is understandable. If > anyone has any news on > Pogorelich, please do pass it on. It would be > terrible to lose him, > especially considering how many years he could have > ahead of him. > > Mandy > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size - was: Service List - Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 20:33:10 +0800   10-4-2-1 here. Four of the sopranos are girls. The usual shortage of male singers though our tenor line is strong. Several of the adult sopranos are really only bodies in the seats, but I would not tell them that! Bob E.   JKVDP@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 5/27/01 4:36:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > << The choir was only 3-1-1-1 this morning, plus me singing tenor from = the > console, but they sounded pretty good, all in all.    
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size - was: Service List - Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 07:48:09 -0500     Jerry asked about choir size:   Church of the Incarnation, Dallas:   Men's choir (evensong twice per month, and other occasional services) 10 voices, essentially all baritones.   The choir which typically sings at the 9:00 AM service on Sundays is about = 6 - 4 - 4 - 6; the choir which sings at 11:15 is divided SATB / SATB, and has = 6 - 4 - 3 - 4 / 5 - 5 - 4 - 5   ns    
(back) Subject: Choir Size From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 13:56:25 +0100   Well over here in my English Parish Church I have (when they all turn = up...) 11 Children (Boys and Girls), 7 Sopranos, 4 Altos (3 women, 1 gentleman), = 3 Tenors and 4 Basses and me singing any old thing from the organ = console!... however this last Sunday I was missing all but 4 of the children as is the school half-term holiday over here. I just wish I could get my sopranos = to sing more confidently sometimes... I am quite proud of this little group though as when I got to the church 3 and a half years ago there were just = a small handful of adults. It is very difficult to encourage children to = join choirs in this country as they get so much stick from their peers, so to have 11 (and the last three with very little effort from me!) I think is encouraging - they are, after all, the choirs of the future.   Are many children in choirs elsewhere? interesting to know.   Steve Canterbury (not the Cathedral though!) UK    
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size - was: Service List - Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 09:16:11 EDT     --part1_3a.15adf7a8.2844fb1b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/29/01 8:47:12 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mjolnir@ticnet.com writes:     > > Church of the Incarnation, Dallas: > > . . . the choir which sings at 11:15 is divided SATB / SATB, and has 6 = - > 4 - 3 - 4 / 5 - 5 - 4 - 5 >   Please elaborate on how you have arrived at the divided set-up and how it works. Thanks.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_3a.15adf7a8.2844fb1b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/29/01 8:47:12 AM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>mjolnir@ticnet.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR>Church of the Incarnation, Dallas: <BR> <BR>. . . &nbsp;the choir which sings at 11:15 is divided SATB / SATB, and = has 6 - <BR>4 - 3 - 4 / 5 - 5 - 4 - 5 <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Please elaborate on how you have arrived at the divided set-up and how = it <BR>works. &nbsp;Thanks. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_3a.15adf7a8.2844fb1b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 09:18:13 EDT     --part1_9c.ea1949a.2844fb95_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/29/01 9:00:40 AM Eastern Daylight Time, steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk writes:     > It is very difficult to encourage children to join > choirs in this country as they get so much stick from their peers, so to > have 11 (and the last three with very little effort from me!) I think is > encouraging - they are, after all, the choirs of the future. > Seems they are also a significant part of the choirs of the present. I've =   always thought it unfortunate not to have children in the regular parish choir. Strangely, most of the resistance has come from adults!   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_9c.ea1949a.2844fb95_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/29/01 9:00:40 AM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It is very = difficult to encourage children to join <BR>choirs in this country as they get so much stick from their peers, so = to <BR>have 11 (and the last three with very little effort from me!) I think = is <BR>encouraging - they are, after all, the choirs of the future. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Seems they are also a significant part of the = choirs of the present. &nbsp;I've <BR>always thought it unfortunate not to have children in the regular = parish <BR>choir. &nbsp;Strangely, most of the resistance has come from adults! <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9c.ea1949a.2844fb95_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 15:03:42 GMT   Steve's comments are pretty much the reverse of my experience. We have no children, 6 sopranos, 3 altos, 2 tenors and 2 basses. Ten years ago we had children in the choir, but this was problematical. If I recall correctly, two of them were the churchwarden's children, so I suspect the application of parental pressure. For another thing, the organist in those days was a teenager himself and this presented a problem of authority.   The current choir director has decided against having children in the choir: the ones who have come along haven't stayed, but I couldn't say whether this is cause or effect.   Mark Harris London  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 10:13:25 -0400   our choir has... 41 sopranos 38 altos 16 tenors 16 bases   we recently merged the 'adult' choir with the 'youth' choir. Now, we have members from the age of 11 to 76. It sounds wonderful.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Choir numbers & American Organs From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 10:36:53 -0400   My choir is 3-4-3 (no tenors), in MA. I have visited quite a few parish churches in Scotland, I have not seen = any reed organs, just old trackers. For instance, the 1658 Sorn Parish Church in Ayrshire, where my paternal great-grandparents are buried, has an old "unknown" tracker donated in the 1970's, it came from a chapel at the Glasgow Cathedral, and has a recent 2 M. side console with colored stop tabs. The organ itself does still sound very old. The Catrine Parish Church, built in the 1780's, where my maternal great-grandparents are buried, has an 1890's Harrison & Harrison tracker which is badly in need of tuning. Most of the trackers I have seen have no nameplates. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 29 May 2001 08:05:32 -0700   On Sun, 27 May 2001, "Jackson R. Williams II" wrote:   > > Oh yeah, Carlo? Which great organists never studied > the piano? Go ahead..name them.   Johann Sebastian Bach      
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 29 May 2001 08:44:31 -0700   On Sun, 27 May 2001, "Jackson R. Williams II" wrote:   > > I hear some of the world's greatest pianists play > regularly in Davies Hall. I've never seen any of them > throw their bodies at the piano. In fact, I've seen > absolute control and economy of motion. > My point has nothing to do with absolute control and economy of motion. = It's that piano technique involves application of the whole upper body's = weight. On the organ, as on the harpsichord, you stroke a key from the = knuckle down, and sometimes, depending on what you're playing, from the = elbow down. On the piano, it's routinely from the shoulder, and it can be = from the waist. To play the piano well, you have to plant your feet and = butt in the right places, because they're the tripod that support the = movement of the upper body's weight onto and off of the keyboard. That's = why pedal pianos don't have a lot of literature.   Imagine yourself suspended horizontally from a sling, with the keyboard at = a comfortable distance below and ahead of you. You could play a = harpsichord just fine this way, ditto an organ as long as it wasn't a = badly-balanced tracker. But if you tried performing piano music this way, = it just wouldn't come out right. It would be like swinging a tennis = racket from a wheelchair, which people do, but without much power or = control because a tennis swing starts from the feet. A wrist-based squash = swing, on the other hand, would work just fine as long as the wheelchair = was in the right place.   Good tennis players exhibit absolute control and economy of motion, just = like good pianists. But their technique is not the same as that of squash = players, and piano technique, no matter how economical, is not the same as = organ technique.   There's another key (oops) difference. One of the most important fine = points of piano technique is the relative loudness of notes, which you = control by how hard you hit the keys. This is critical to shaping a = phrase. On the organ, as on the harpsichord, it's articulation -- the = amount of space you place between notes. The harpsichord is particularly = good for developing this skill, because its percussive release makes = articulation stand out. The piano, quite frankly, is rather bad in this = department. Even without pedal, it tends to cover over fine differences = in spacing, and composers learned not to depend on articulation.   Although I'm not inclined to advance it, one could make the argument that = piano study is actually bad for organ technique.   Dick Meckstroth      
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 09:37:24 -0700 (PDT)   On the organ, you stroke a key from the knuckle down? I don't know with whom you studied, but I'm surprised you don't have a serious case of tendonitis or carpel tunnel syndrome. Secondly, I had a talk with two great pianists recently, Murray Periah and Richard Goode, at dinners following there concerts. Both felt that piano playing was controlled from the wrists and hands and that playing from the shoulders or anywhere else beyond that contributed to a very harsh sound.   Secondly, you have not read my longer letter carefully. Of course Bach didn't practice the piano. Re-read what I wrote about the evolution of pianism and technique growing out of the virtuoso tradition of the 19th century and how organ repertoire grew out of pianistic writing.   --- support@opensystemsorgans.com wrote: > On Sun, 27 May 2001, "Jackson R. Williams II" wrote: > > > > > I hear some of the world's greatest pianists play > > regularly in Davies Hall. I've never seen any of > them > > throw their bodies at the piano. In fact, I've > seen > > absolute control and economy of motion. > > > My point has nothing to do with absolute control and > economy of motion. It's that piano technique > involves application of the whole upper body's > weight. On the organ, as on the harpsichord, you > stroke a key from the knuckle down, and sometimes, > depending on what you're playing, from the elbow > down. On the piano, it's routinely from the > shoulder, and it can be from the waist. To play the > piano well, you have to plant your feet and butt in > the right places, because they're the tripod that > support the movement of the upper body's weight onto > and off of the keyboard. That's why pedal pianos > don't have a lot of literature. > > Imagine yourself suspended horizontally from a > sling, with the keyboard at a comfortable distance > below and ahead of you. You could play a > harpsichord just fine this way, ditto an organ as > long as it wasn't a badly-balanced tracker. But if > you tried performing piano music this way, it just > wouldn't come out right. It would be like swinging > a tennis racket from a wheelchair, which people do, > but without much power or control because a tennis > swing starts from the feet. A wrist-based squash > swing, on the other hand, would work just fine as > long as the wheelchair was in the right place. > > Good tennis players exhibit absolute control and > economy of motion, just like good pianists. But > their technique is not the same as that of squash > players, and piano technique, no matter how > economical, is not the same as organ technique. > > There's another key (oops) difference. One of the > most important fine points of piano technique is the > relative loudness of notes, which you control by how > hard you hit the keys. This is critical to shaping > a phrase. On the organ, as on the harpsichord, it's > articulation -- the amount of space you place > between notes. The harpsichord is particularly good > for developing this skill, because its percussive > release makes articulation stand out. The piano, > quite frankly, is rather bad in this department. > Even without pedal, it tends to cover over fine > differences in spacing, and composers learned not to > depend on articulation. > > Although I'm not inclined to advance it, one could > make the argument that piano study is actually bad > for organ technique. > > Dick Meckstroth > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 12:43:24 EDT     --part1_e2.1564a6cd.28452bac_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   The breakdown of size of the National Shrine's Parish Choir is as follows:   17 Sopranos 12 Altos 7 Tenors 11 Basses   That is- when they are all there! =3D20   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_e2.1564a6cd.28452bac_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">The breakdown of size = of the N=3D ational Shrine's Parish Choir is as follows: <BR> <BR>17 Sopranos <BR>12 Altos <BR>7 Tenors <BR>11 Basses <BR> <BR>That is- when they are all there! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_e2.1564a6cd.28452bac_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 11:49:02 -0500   I am so fortunate at St. Andrew's Woodhaven in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.   I have 9 sopranos, 5 altos, 5 tenors and 5 basses plus myself on either tenor or bass as required. Sight-readers in each part and some = solo-quality voices in all but the alto lines.   They don't always turn up and they don't work as hard as they should all = the time. But they're fun and funny, work like beavers when they're up against it, and all told are a great group to work with.   I did a recital/concert with the group this year which took them through = the history of church music all the way from early plainchant, Palestrina and Byrd to Gospel and Praise Chorus. And they did beautifully.   Best regards, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size and Configuration From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 12:50:27 EDT     --part1_de.154a768c.28452d53_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   Regarding the divides set up at the Church of the Incarnation in = Dallas,=3D20 Bruce Cornely asked how the SATBs were divided. At the Shrine we = have=3D20 Anglican-style choir stalls as well and also divide on two sides.   Basically I have choir 1 (1st SATBs) on one side and choir 2 (2ns SATBs) = on=3D20 the other. We are blest with many strong singers and have the = sections=3D20 divided up accordingly so that there is definite leadership on both sides. = =3D20 In this set up I have the tenors and basses on the back row with the = soprano=3D s=3D20 and altos on the two rows in front of them. This occurs on both sides of = th=3D e=3D20 chancel.   We also have a "sectional" set up where the sopranos and altos are on = one=3D20 side and the tenors and basses on the other. In this configuration = the=3D20 singers are in "block formation" where there are three rows of each = part,=3D20 with the stronger singers generally on the back two rows. Although, = again,=3D20 there is strength in this choir- the majority of individuals can really = pull=3D =3D20 their own weight thankfully!   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_de.154a768c.28452d53_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">Regarding the divides = set up a=3D t the Church of the Incarnation in Dallas,=3D20 <BR>Bruce Cornely asked how the SATBs were divided. &nbsp;At the Shrine we = h=3D ave=3D20 <BR>Anglican-style choir stalls as well and also divide on two sides. <BR> <BR>Basically I have choir 1 (1st SATBs) on one side and choir 2 (2ns = SATBs)=3D on=3D20 <BR>the other. &nbsp;We are blest with many strong singers and have the = sect=3D ions=3D20 <BR>divided up accordingly so that there is definite leadership on both = side=3D s. &nbsp; <BR>In this set up I have the tenors and basses on the back row with the = sop=3D ranos=3D20 <BR>and altos on the two rows in front of them. &nbsp;This occurs on both = si=3D des of the=3D20 <BR>chancel. <BR> <BR>We also have a "sectional" set up where the sopranos and altos are on = on=3D e=3D20 <BR>side and the tenors and basses on the other. &nbsp;In this = configuration=3D the=3D20 <BR>singers are in "block formation" where there are three rows of each = part=3D ,=3D20 <BR>with the stronger singers generally on the back two rows. = &nbsp;Although=3D , again,=3D20 <BR>there is strength in this choir- the majority of individuals can = really=3D20=3D pull=3D20 <BR>their own weight thankfully! <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_de.154a768c.28452d53_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Youth in the Choir (was Choir Size) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 12:53:05 EDT     --part1_78.157e8e02.28452df1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   At the Shrine I have allowed high school age individuals to join = PROVIDED=3D20 THAT they are willing to make the time commitment, can read music and want = t=3D o=3D20 be there. We are blest with four high school age altos, two high school = age=3D =3D20 sopranos and one tenor. Prior to my appointment youth were not allowed = and=3D20 when I changed that policy there was much sqwaking from the "old guard." = Bu=3D t=3D20 now they see and hear the strength and contribution that the young = people=3D20 bring and it is marvelous. They really have bought into the music and = the=3D20 direction the program is taking!   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_78.157e8e02.28452df1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">At the Shrine I have = allowed h=3D igh school age individuals to join PROVIDED=3D20 <BR>THAT they are willing to make the time commitment, can read music and = wa=3D nt to=3D20 <BR>be there. &nbsp;We are blest with four high school age altos, two high = s=3D chool age=3D20 <BR>sopranos and one tenor. &nbsp;Prior to my appointment youth were not = all=3D owed and=3D20 <BR>when I changed that policy there was much sqwaking from the "old = guard."=3D &nbsp;But=3D20 <BR>now they see and hear the strength and contribution that the young = peopl=3D e=3D20 <BR>bring and it is marvelous. &nbsp;They really have bought into the = music=3D20=3D and the=3D20 <BR>direction the program is taking! <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_78.157e8e02.28452df1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 12:03:30 -0500   Northminster Ch., Monroe, LA   7 sopranos, 7 altos, 3 tenors, 5 basses   Two Childrens Choirs ... ages 5-8, ages 9-16 ....