PipeChat Digest #2130 - Tuesday, May 29, 2001
 
Re: Choir Size
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Choir Size - was: Service List -  Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
re: Choir Size
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: Choir Size (correction)
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Choir Size
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Youth in the Choir (was Choir Size)
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas
  by "Jeffery Korns" <jakorns@home.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 13:25:40 EDT   Carlo writes:   >our choir has... >41 sopranos >38 altos >16 tenors >16 bases<<   Don't dispair, Carlo! Active recruiting can increase these anemic = numbers. :) Heck, we didn't have that many in services Sunday!   My choir (formerly my choir - I retired in April) consisted of 4-3-3-3. = One of the alto's developed severe pulmonary distress and missed several weeks =   which distressed her more than the physical infirmity. To the delight of everyone, Lorene returned on my last Sunday. I almost fell off the bench = at the sight of her in the Procession, pushing her little oxygen tank as she made her way to the Chancel area along with the rest of the choir. That = was one of the most hilarious sights of my forty-four years in church music.   It was also the most forceful testimony of service and commitment I have = yet to witness.   Regards,   Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 13:27:50 -0400   yes it is a Roman Catholic Church. I'm the organist/choir director, and my fianc=E9e is the pianist/assistant music director. Sometimes we use organ, sometimes piano, sometimes both.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 13:20:59 -0500       Stephen Barker asked:   > Are many children in choirs elsewhere? interesting to know.   Church of the Incarnation has two children's choirs: one, ensemble for = children from 6 - 8 years old, or so, and the other for the group of children just = above that. Both groups contain about a dozen or so young people.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 14:24:23 -0400   we had a separate youth choir and adult choir. Since I've been there, = we've basically been singing the same repertoire, thus having 2 separate choirs was pointless. We merged them, with wonderful results. We are now the 2nd largest choir in Montreal, and the only choir whose members represent = every age group. We sing everything from Contemporary music (Glory & Praise), to hymns, to the great choral works of Bach, Handel and Mozart. One thing we don't do (very often) is Latin.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size - was: Service List - Sunday, May 27 - St Matthew From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 13:28:53 -0500     --------------11972B5EC571949B4C41EEF3 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 5/29/01 8:47:12 AM Eastern Daylight Time, > mjolnir@ticnet.com writes: > >> >> Church of the Incarnation, Dallas: >> >> . . . the choir which sings at 11:15 is divided SATB / SATB, and >> has 6 - >> 4 - 3 - 4 / 5 - 5 - 4 - 5 > > Please elaborate on how you have arrived at the divided set-up and how > it > works. Thanks.   [With tongue firmly planted in cheek]: I have generally arrived by motor vehicle, although later next year, with the completion of the appropriate segment of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Line, I may begin arriving in that means. My vehicle is rather typical; make sure there is fuel, put the key in the ignition, and turn the switch. I get about 25 miles per gallon of fuel; last time I filled up, it was at 1.599 US$ per gallon.   [Extracting tongue from cheek]: The division of the choirs is in accordance with what I understand to be the "typical" English Cathedral model, and was implemented prior to my arrival on the scene.   ns   --------------11972B5EC571949B4C41EEF3 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> &nbsp; <br>Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 5/29/01 8:47:12 AM Eastern Daylight Time,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>mjolnir@ticnet.com = writes:</font></font> <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&nbsp; <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Church of the = Incarnation, Dallas:</font></font> <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>. . .&nbsp; the choir = which sings at 11:15 is divided SATB / SATB, and has 6 -</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>4 - 3 - 4 / 5 - 5 - 4 - 5</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Please = elaborate on how you have arrived at the divided set-up and how = it</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>works.&nbsp; Thanks.</font></font></font></blockquote> [With tongue firmly planted in cheek]:&nbsp; I have generally arrived by motor vehicle, although later next year, with the completion of the = appropriate segment of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Line, I may begin arriving in that means.&nbsp; My vehicle is rather typical; make sure there is fuel, put the key in the ignition, and turn the switch.&nbsp; I get about 25 miles per gallon of fuel; last time I filled up, it was at 1.599 US$ per gallon.&nbsp;&nbsp; <p>[Extracting tongue from cheek]:&nbsp; The division of the choirs is in accordance with what I understand to be the "typical" English Cathedral model, and was implemented prior to my arrival on the scene. <p>ns</html>   --------------11972B5EC571949B4C41EEF3--    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 29 May 2001 11:28:27 -0700   On Tue, 29 May 2001, "Jackson R. Williams II" wrote:   > > On the organ, you stroke a key from the knuckle down?   Now that you mention it, there's a continuum, depending upon what I'm = playing. At the finger extreme, playing two-part inventions on the = harpsichord or organ is a lot like typing. My fingers go up and down, but = the rest of each hand doesn't move with every note, as when I play the = piano. My wrists regulate pressure, but that's just so that I press the = keys fast enough for the attacks to occur when I expect them but not fast = enough to make noise or subject the instrument to unnecessary wear (which = is why a lot of harpsichord owners won't let pianists near their = instruments).   The other extreme is something like the Widor Toccata, where I play the = single-voice line mostly from the knuckles and the chords mostly from the = wrist -- maybe even a tad of elnow. It's closer to piano technique, but = still different. I could play the Toccata slung in my sling, as long as = the action wasn't too heavy. > piano playing was controlled from the wrists and > hands and that playing from the shoulders or anywhere > else beyond that contributed to a very harsh sound.   Fine, but playing the piano still requires the very carefully varied = application of upper body weight to the keyboard. Try playing the piano = fortissimo without moving your elbows. Try playing at any volume with = your upper body held so that your shoulders don't move back and forth. = Try playing with your feet off the floor. You can do it, but you won't = like the results.   > > Secondly, you have not read my longer letter > carefully. Of course Bach didn't practice the piano.   Please no offense, but the logic here seems to be that you can become a = great organist without piano training, so long as there are no pianos. = But if there are pianos, then you can't become a great organist without = playing them.   Either that, or Bach wasn't a great organist. Bach was admired more as an = organist than as a composer. So were all organists of his time lousy?   > Re-read what I wrote about the evolution of pianism > and technique growing out of the virtuoso tradition of > the 19th century and how organ repertoire grew out of > pianistic writing.   I did read it. Later organ music is like piano music because it's = pianistic. Sounds like a tautology to me. If you mean that there's more = wrist in 19th century organ music than 17th, I agree. If you mean that = you need to plant your feet firmly and lean into the keyboard, then I = don't.   Please don't overinterpret my remarks. I, for one, do not think that = piano playing is harmful or that practicing the instrument doesn't help = some people with their organ technique. But I agree with Carlo that it = isn't essential, and I think that good harpsichord technique is a bigger = help than good piano technique.   I should confess a couple of points that support your argument, though.   First, I have a preference for Bach, so my = harpsichord-articulation-over-pianistic-wrist thing is more practical for = me than for the Romantics out there. (Along the same lines, I like a lot = of Gould's Bach better than most other piano transcriptions of Bach's = harpsichord music.)   Second, I, too, started piano when I was 5. If I were a great organist, = I'd be proving you right!   Dick      
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 14:38:22 -0400   I never took piano lessons. I started fooling around on the piano when I = was 6. I was picking out melodies. I was able to play all the hymns that were sung at my church. I played my first mass on Easter Sunday 1978. The organist there taught me how to read music, and gave me a few lessons on = the organ. I couldn't reach the pedals, mind you. I began organ lessons at age 11. When I was 15, I started studying under Raymond Daveluy. Then later = on, I spent one year with Bernard Lagac=E9, then a year with H=E9l=E8ne Dugal = (another well-known Montreal organist). In 1991, I spent one year with Diane Bish. She told me that there was no way she could tell that I never studied = piano. She also said that you don't have to have studied piano to be a great organist. No two organists are alike. Some benefit from it, others don't need it. It all depends on the person.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: re: Choir Size From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 15:08:57 EDT     --part1_c6.163b543c.28454dc9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In my most recent church, (Evangel Temple) there were 40 sopranos, 32 = altos, 28 tenors, and 16 basses. That only filled up about half of the choir = loft, which was at the highest point on the stage, it kind of formed an arc. = With the concert grand piano being right smack in the middle of the stage in = front of the choir, and the organ facing the congregation right behind the = piano. The organist faces the choir, and orchestra director, instead of facing = the choir. The orchestra taking up about a third of the left hand side of the =   stage, and on the right side is where all the pastors sit in these huge chairs. (there are 8 of them) So really it produces a very balanced = effect. At Evangel Temple, the choir was open for members 12 and up. But there = was a youth choir, a choir for college students, and a children's choir also. = By choice, most all of the youth were in the youth choir, not the adult sanctuary choir. I was one of the youngest people in the choir, and the = age of 19. Only the adult sanctuary choir ever led worship in the main sanctuary, so = I could never understand why the younger ones never had an interest in = joining. There are occasions when the adult choir, and youth choir combine, but rarely at that... The youth choir consists of about 60 people from the ages 12, to 18. The children's choir consists of over 100, but that's only because the = children's choir isn't something that the children even get a choice over-if you are = a child, you will sing with the children, whenever they have something prepared. That's mainly because there is a separate children's church, = and every now and then they will sing something for the morning service. I personally think that the adult choir and the youth choir should = combine, along with the youth orchestra. If they did, the stage would finally be filled up... It always looks SO empty up there, and I think its = unfortunate that we have so much space, and never use it!   Josh   --part1_c6.163b543c.28454dc9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In my most recent = church, (Evangel Temple) there were 40 sopranos, 32 altos, <BR>28 tenors, and 16 basses. &nbsp;That only filled up about half of the = choir loft, <BR>which was at the highest point on the stage, it kind of formed an arc. = &nbsp;With <BR>the concert grand piano being right smack in the middle of the stage = in front <BR>of the choir, and the organ facing the congregation right behind the = piano. &nbsp; <BR>The organist faces the choir, and orchestra director, instead of = facing the <BR>choir. &nbsp;The orchestra taking up about a third of the left hand = side of the <BR>stage, and on the right side is where all the pastors sit in these = huge <BR>chairs. &nbsp;(there are 8 of them) &nbsp;So really it produces a very = balanced effect. <BR>At Evangel Temple, the choir was open for members 12 and up. &nbsp;But = there was a <BR>youth choir, a choir for college students, and a children's choir = also. &nbsp;By <BR>choice, most all of the youth were in the youth choir, not the adult <BR>sanctuary choir. &nbsp;I was one of the youngest people in the choir, = and the age <BR>of 19. <BR>Only the adult sanctuary choir ever led worship in the main sanctuary, = so I <BR>could never understand why the younger ones never had an interest in = joining. <BR>&nbsp;There are occasions when the adult choir, and youth choir = combine, but <BR>rarely at that... <BR>The youth choir consists of about 60 people from the ages 12, to 18. = &nbsp;The <BR>children's choir consists of over 100, but that's only because the = children's <BR>choir isn't something that the children even get a choice over-if you = are a <BR>child, you will sing with the children, whenever they have something <BR>prepared. &nbsp;That's mainly because there is a separate children's = church, and <BR>every now and then they will sing something for the morning service. = &nbsp; <BR>I personally think that the adult choir and the youth choir should = combine, <BR>along with the youth orchestra. &nbsp;If they did, the stage would = finally be <BR>filled up... &nbsp;It always looks SO empty up there, and I think its = unfortunate <BR>that we have so much space, and never use it! <BR> <BR>Josh</FONT></HTML>   --part1_c6.163b543c.28454dc9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size (correction) From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 15:14:28 EDT     --part1_13.16447a3e.28454f14_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   The organist faces the congregation, not the choir. (that's what I get = for not proofreading!)   --part1_13.16447a3e.28454f14_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>The organist faces the = congregation, not the choir. &nbsp;(that's what I get for <BR>not proofreading!)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_13.16447a3e.28454f14_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 16:20:04 EDT     --part1_50.16608a5e.28455e74_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Our children's choirs are separate from my youth and adult choirs.   This past year I had nearly 60 children, so we're moving from 2 to 3 = choirs to accommodate them.   Cheers, Neil B Barnegat, NJ USA   --part1_50.16608a5e.28455e74_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>Our children's choirs are separate from my youth and adult = choirs. <BR> <BR>This past year I had nearly 60 children, so we're moving from 2 to 3 = choirs <BR>to accommodate them. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR>Neil B <BR>Barnegat, NJ USA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_50.16608a5e.28455e74_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Choir Size From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 22:57:24 +0100   > For another thing, the organist in those days was a > teenager himself and this presented a problem of authority.   Well, I'm actually only 24 myself, and although not a teenager anymore = don't have any problem with authority... the kids are only between 7-11 years = old at the moment - I targetted recruitment at the younger ones around 7 - 9 = ish to start with so that we'd have them for a good few years. Nearly all of the children have come to the church for the choir and many have brought their families with them. One has been baptised since. Even though one = was on scout camp last weekend, her mum still came to Evensong. So 'traditional' music can still have its part in making a church grow!   Steve Canterbury UK      
(back) Subject: Re: Youth in the Choir (was Choir Size) From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 23:08:42 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0064_01C0E894.4E124D40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   You say that you only take children that can read music - I see it as =3D part of my job as Organist and Choirmaster to teach any of the children = =3D (Or adults for that matter) who come to the choir to read music... don't = =3D we want ot be as open as possible to try to get as many interested as =3D possible?=3D20   do people agree or not?   Steve Canterbury   At the Shrine I have allowed high school age individuals to join =3D PROVIDED=3D20 THAT they are willing to make the time commitment, can read music and = =3D want to=3D20 be there. We are blest with four high school age altos, two high =3D school age=3D20 sopranos and one tenor. Prior to my appointment youth were not =3D allowed and=3D20 when I changed that policy there was much sqwaking from the "old =3D guard." But=3D20 now they see and hear the strength and contribution that the young =3D people=3D20 bring and it is marvelous. They really have bought into the music and = =3D the=3D20 direction the program is taking!=3D20     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0064_01C0E894.4E124D40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; = charset=3D3Dutf-8"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4134.600" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>You say that you only take children = =3D that can read=3D20 music - I see it as part of my job as Organist and Choirmaster to teach = =3D any of=3D20 the children (Or adults for that matter)&nbsp;who come to the choir to =3D read=3D20 music... don't we want ot be as open as possible to try to get as = many=3D20 interested as possible? </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>do people agree or not?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Steve</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Canterbury</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3D"Comic = Sans =3D MS"=3D20 color=3D3D#0000a0 size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT">At the Shrine I have = =3D allowed high school=3D20 age individuals to join PROVIDED <BR>THAT they are willing to make the = =3D time=3D20 commitment, can read music and want to <BR>be there. &nbsp;We are =3D blest with=3D20 four high school age altos, two high school age <BR>sopranos and one =3D tenor.=3D20 &nbsp;Prior to my appointment youth were not allowed and <BR>when I =3D changed=3D20 that policy there was much sqwaking from the "old guard." &nbsp;But =3D <BR>now=3D20 they see and hear the strength and contribution that the young = people=3D20 <BR>bring and it is marvelous. &nbsp;They really have bought into the = =3D music=3D20 and the <BR>direction the program is taking! </FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" color=3D3D#0000a0 =3D size=3D3D2></FONT><FONT=3D20 face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" =3D color=3D3D#0000a0 size=3D3D2=3D20 =3D FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT">&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0064_01C0E894.4E124D40--    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 15:20:35 -0700 (PDT)   I still can't believe that Diane said that. Maybe it was a day on which she was feeling out of sorts. Maybe she had a fight with a piano teacher. Maybe the local piano salesman didn't give her the kind of deal on a new instrument that she wanted and she thought that by steering her students away from the piano would deprive him of sales. Maybe she couldn't find a pair of shoes that day that would go well with that special chiffon dress that looks so good in the reflective sheen of the white gloss on the piano, maybe she got into a fight with Carlo Curley and decided to show him a thing or two and who's really the First Lady Of The Organ-- but first, rather than tell him he can't play the piano as well as she can, she'd first sign with Allen and make her Diane Bish Series instruments more attractive with wedgewood stops and lace keycheeks (OOOOOh, lace over those cheeks!--top that Carlo short and curleys--and on top of all that show him that she looks better in HER Allen advertisements wearing a dress better than he ever would. Maybe that's what happened.   --- Carlo Pietroniro <organist@total.net> wrote: > I never took piano lessons. I started fooling around > on the piano when I was > 6. I was picking out melodies. I was able to play > all the hymns that were > sung at my church. I played my first mass on Easter > Sunday 1978. The > organist there taught me how to read music, and gave > me a few lessons on the > organ. I couldn't reach the pedals, mind you. I > began organ lessons at age > 11. When I was 15, I started studying under Raymond > Daveluy. Then later on, > I spent one year with Bernard Lagac=E9, then a year > with H=E9l=E8ne Dugal (another > well-known Montreal organist). In 1991, I spent one > year with Diane Bish. > She told me that there was no way she could tell > that I never studied piano. > She also said that you don't have to have studied > piano to be a great > organist. No two organists are alike. Some benefit > from it, others don't > need it. It all depends on the person. > > Carlo > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 18:28:30 -0400   maybe the reason for Diane saying that was...........it's true. Don't forget, at the time, I was already an accomplished organist. The year I spent with her was not during my formative years as an organist. It wasn't up to her to go back in time and un-do something, if there was anything TO un-do.   Piano is NOT a must when taking organ. If it works for one person, then great. However, that rule should not be applied to everyone. If it helps some people, that doesn't mean everyone needs it.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Easy Bach, Historical Fingering and Other Dilemmas From: "Jeffery Korns" <jakorns@home.com> Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 17:46:11 -0500   Forgive me if someone has already suggested this but..: Has anyone mentioned that the reason in the 20th century that so many organists had a piano background may have less to with technical than practical. Up until the 50's it was extremely uncommon for a private home to have an organ. More houses still have pianos than organs, so as a practical matter of keyboard instruction children started on what they had, a piano. Eventually they might move on to the organ, given the attitude of local teachers or in the case of some colleges it was a requirement. It seems like the story of the woman that always cut the end of the = ham off before cooking it. She didn't know why, but that was the way her = mother did it because that was the way her mother did it. Finally the woman = asked her grandmother why they cut the end off of the ham. Grandma replied, = "It's because I didn't have a large enough pan". J ----- Original Message ----- From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> > > Piano is NOT a must when taking organ. If it works for one person, then > great. However, that rule should not be applied to everyone. If it helps > some people, that doesn't mean everyone needs it. > > Carlo > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >