PipeChat Digest #2473 - Thursday, November 1, 2001
 
Re: Re[4]: Membership in the parish
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2472 - 11/01/01
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
More info of Fire
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Church Arson in Lunenberg
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Casavant Opus#2243  destroyed
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Nigel Potts
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: Nigel Potts
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Church on Fire Pictures added to webpage
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Video of fire at St. John's Anglican Lunenburg NS
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Organ Specifications Posted
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Fire: St. Johns Anglican, Lunenburg NS
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
More Cassette Tapes -- Organ & Choir
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: The uninitiated and the layman audiences (was: Nigel Potts)
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: The uninitated and the layman audiences
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
All Saints' Day in Hades, a tiny town next to Perdition
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Re[4]: Membership in the parish
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Re[4]: Membership in the parish From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 07:30:27 EST   > To be consistent, wouldn't you need to be equally finicky about the personal > beliefs of all the *composers* whose music you deigned to use in your > services?     I served a church where the pastor wouldn't let anyone sing "Battle Hymn = of the Republic" at any Patriotic because the composer was a Unitarian. I = had to scour through all sorts of books to find information on Julia Ward = Howe, and lo and behold, it was true. But where does Unitarian thought come = into that song?   My criteria for chosing music was always 1. that it fit the theme of the service, 2. that any Biblical quotes were correct, 3. that the music glorified God and edified the congregation in some way, 4. that the = composer was of Judeo-Christian belief. I include Jewish composers in this because = I feel that we worship the same God and our Old Testament scriptures are the =   same.   I don't think that most people or clergy really care if a composer is Methodist or Baptist or Lutheran, etc. Non-Christians can write some beautiful music, and plenty of it has been written. But from my = theological perspective, I can't in good conscience lead people in worship if the = music doesn't have a good groundwork. Now for a concert, or non-church service kind of program, why or how the music was written doesn't bother me. I = can play all sorts of beautiful music for that....regardless of the composer's =   beliefs. I just can't get past the idea that for a church service, the stakes are higher....we're there to present music to worship God (the God Christians and Jews worship) and music that wasn't written to magnify Him doesn't fit.   Putting on my flame suit now...........     Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2472 - 11/01/01 From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 09:55:02 -0400   Too All who are interested Last Night as we all know was Halloween Brings alot of Mischief and = vandelism around our Countries Unfortunatly amongst this mischief was the Arson of a very Historic = Church in the East of Canada In Lunenburg which has North Americas second oldest Wooden Anglican = Church his church was lost by a major fire last night The history of this Church Building Dates Back 250 years.It is unknown = how extensive the destruction is. I know this Church has a fairly large casavant divided into two = chambers,It is Large at least for Nova Scotia small community I am tryin g to find out more but here is a link to the history of the church http://www.town.lunenburg.ns.ca/pages/history/architecture/architecture01.h= tml#     - St. John's Anglican Church - 65 Cumberland Street           " Nestled in the Town's centre and occupying the westernmost of the four blocks that were originally reserved for public purposes, is St. John's Anglican Church. At the time of the settlement in 1753 services were first held in the open air on this site under the ministry of the first Anglican missionary, Jean Baptiste Moreau.   In 1754, the Lords of Trade and Plantations (the British Colonial Government administrators) made a grant of about 500 pounds for the building of a church, and the oak frame of St. John's was brought to Lunenburg from Boston. It is believed that the frame may have come from the old King's Chapel in Boston, which was being dismantled at the time.   The original building was constructed in the simple, two storey, New England meeting house style. It took several years to build the church and it was not until 1763 that the building could be finished to the point where it could be said to be "neat and commodious".   Early sketches indicate that the church originally had a circular tower with a steeply pitched conical roof.   The building remained in this original form for more than 80 years.   In 1840, the tower was redesigned by William Lawson, a school master who later became principal of the Lunenburg Grammer School. The new tower was 12 x 12 ft. square, 70 ft. high and had "handsome pinnacles in the gothic style," heralding the burgeoning overall gothic character of the church. The new tower also facilitated the inclusion of a vestry room, a large entry room, and a singing pew. It cost about 300 pounds to build, and later, housed a bell donated by Admiral Boscowen. Between 1870-75, the church was moved 25 ft. to the west to make room for the addition of a new chancel at the eastern end. At the same time the nave was extended by 10 ft. and the flat, plastered ceiling was changed to the present sloping ceiling. Also, the tower was rebuilt yet again, taking the form in which it can still be seen today.   The next change came in 1892 when the present side aisles, designed by a committee of carpenters from the congregation, were added under the direction of Solomon Morash. Also at this time, the notable hammer beam ceiling structure was installed. The beams occur at each column location and are joined across the width of the church by steel tie rods. In addition to the exposed wooden roof deck, dark wooden pews, wooden floor, marbleized pillars, and many stained glass windows, paintings and plaques have, over the years, added further richness to the interior.   Despite alterations, the church has acquired a unique, highly ornamented "carpenter gothic" character that is in perfect harmony with both its site and with the wooden houses that surround it, these houses themselves having been altered and ornamented in much the same way. The church, which, after St. Paul's in Halifax, was the second Anglican church to be erected in Nova Scotia, is a highly significant local landmark and has been recognized as such by its designation as a Provincial Heritage Property and National Historic Site."   More to come as more details become available    
(back) Subject: More info of Fire From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 09:59:20 -0400   http://novascotia.cbc.ca/editorServlets/View?filename=3Dns_lunenburg110101    
(back) Subject: Re: Church Arson in Lunenberg From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 10:53:29 EST     --part1_22.1e207a9a.2912c9f9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/1/01 9:05:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca writes:     > the Arson of a very Historic Church in the East of Canada > In Lunenburg which has North Americas second oldest Wooden Anglican = Church > his church was lost by a major fire last night   How sad. I just do not understand this kind of behaviour. Lunenberg = must be a wonderful place to live. I would love to be surrounded by such = beauty and history.   Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi     --part1_22.1e207a9a.2912c9f9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/1/01 9:05:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">the Arson of a = very Historic Church in the East of Canada <BR>In Lunenburg which has &nbsp;North Americas second oldest Wooden = Anglican Church <BR>his church was lost by a major fire last night</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>How sad. &nbsp;&nbsp;I just do not understand this kind of behaviour. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Lunenberg must be a wonderful place to live. &nbsp;&nbsp;I = would love to be surrounded by such beauty and history. <BR> <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_22.1e207a9a.2912c9f9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Casavant Opus#2243 destroyed From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 13:38:57 -0400   Casavant Pipe Organ opus#2243 is no longer with us:-((((( It was destroyed in a major Church fire   http://novascotia.cbc.ca/editorServlets/View?filename=3Dns_lunenburg110101 to hear the news story you will need Real Player you can still read but if you want to listen click the little speaker = just below the title Fire and you will hear a report , I expect more = reports will be updated, I saw the Fire report on the Local news, The bell = tower has collapsed, this church has a long history since the carillon was installed in 1902 , to present there have been = only 3 bell ringersthe pipe Organ was installed in 1954as a memorial to = those parishioners who laid down there lives for there country. the alter = was a beautiful carved oak table which depicted a reproduction of Da = Vinci's last supperin 1926. there were many stained glass windows,believe me, they were beautiful the ceiling of the church was a richly decorated hammer beam ceiling of = which the chancel and sanctuary was painted a royal blue with gold leaf = stars. I just cant believe somebody could take a moment of Irrresponsability and = to destroy what took many years to build.   More to come as details and possible urls to story become available   Daniel    
(back) Subject: Nigel Potts From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 14:59:45 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3087471585_9857426_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   The young Kiwi organist Nigel Potts played a recital in Lancaster PA on Sunday afternoon that was just splendid. I know the organ quite well: a 1967 Schlilcker with new Great principal chorus and 16' & 32' Walker = digital pedal stops. Potts obviouslly spent much careful time at the organ, for we heard more from the instrument than I can recall ever hearing from a visiting recitalist. His use of the instrument for the sake of good musicainship was exemplary!   He does not play like a big deal "look at me" type player; he projects the music instead of himself, keeping himself slightly in the background. As such, it may not be the most "thrilling" of playing to the uninitiated, and it does not yield standing ovations from layman audiences, but it is ever so solid and satisfying to a person who does sense good musicianship when he hears it. You never got the impression that he was slave to some pre-imposed "system" of articulation or the like; it was just good, solid musicianship, with the swell pedal used very, very judiciously employed to enhance phrasing, and with registration that fit just right at every turn.   His major offering was Sonata 8 in A by Guilmant, and I could have listened to it all over again!! Other very interesting, and, to me, unfamiliar work: two mov'ts from the Percy Whitlock organ sonata in C minor, of which the Scherzetto mov't was utterly delightful on Sunday.   I understand that he'll play a master's degree recital in Wolsey Hall = at Yale, where he studies with Thomas Murray, on Monday night 26 Nov. I've considered going the whole way to New Haven to hear him on that marvelous organ, given his repertoire, which will include the entire Whilock sonata and also a transcription Potts has done of a Delius orchedstral work, plus again the Guilmant Sonata 8.   This guy is a "sleeper" in our midst. Not that he's not been around = in significant recital venues; but he deserves more attention.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   --MS_Mac_OE_3087471585_9857426_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Nigel Potts</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The young Kiwi organist Nigel Potts played a recital in = =3D Lancaster PA on Sunday afternoon that was just splendid. &nbsp;I know the = or=3D gan quite well: a 1967 Schlilcker with new Great principal chorus and 16' = &a=3D mp; 32' Walker digital pedal stops. Potts obviouslly spent much careful = time=3D at the organ, for we heard more from the instrument than I can recall = <B>ev=3D er</B> hearing from a visiting recitalist. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;His use of = the =3D instrument for the sake of good musicainship was exemplary!<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;He does not play like a big deal &quot;look at me&quot; = =3D type player; he projects the music instead of himself, keeping himself = sligh=3D tly in the background. &nbsp;As such, it may not be the most = &quot;thrilling=3D &quot; of playing to the uninitiated, and it does not yield standing = ovation=3D s from layman audiences, but it is ever so solid and satisfying to a = person =3D who does sense good musicianship when he hears it. &nbsp;&nbsp;You never = got=3D the impression that he was slave to some pre-imposed &quot;system&quot; = of =3D articulation or the like; &nbsp;it was just good, solid musicianship, with = t=3D he swell pedal used very, very judiciously employed to enhance phrasing, = and=3D with registration that fit just right at every turn.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;His major offering was Sonata 8 in A by Guilmant, and I = =3D could have listened to it all over again!! &nbsp;&nbsp;Other very = interestin=3D g, and, to me, unfamiliar work: &nbsp;two mov'ts from the Percy Whitlock = org=3D an sonata in C minor, of which the Scherzetto mov't was utterly delightful o=3D n Sunday. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I understand that he'll play a master's degree recital = i=3D n Wolsey Hall at Yale, where he studies with Thomas Murray, on Monday = night =3D 26 Nov. &nbsp;I've considered going the whole way to New Haven to hear him = o=3D n that marvelous organ, given his repertoire, which will include the = entire =3D Whilock sonata and also a transcription Potts has done of a Delius = orchedstr=3D al work, plus again the Guilmant Sonata 8. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This guy is a &quot;sleeper&quot; &nbsp;in our midst. = &n=3D bsp;&nbsp;Not that he's not been around in significant recital venues; = &nbsp=3D ;but he deserves more attention. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Cordially,<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Karl E. Moyer<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lancaster PA </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3087471585_9857426_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: RE: Nigel Potts From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 14:19:27 -0600   I strongly second Karl's view of Nigel's playing. He gave a wonderfully informed performance of Romantic English organ music here in Oklahoma City in August on St. Paul's Cathedral's 1998 Buzard Opus 20 (II/34) that was = as notable for his very musical renderings of the familiar (e.g., Howells's Master Tallis's Tesament, Thalben-Ball's Elegy, Elgar's Imperial March) as for his appealing introduction of new (to me) works. This is a musician = who keeps his and his audience's minds squarely on the composition at hand -- the organ is truly the medium. Our family will be in New Haven for Thanksgiving, and we look forward to = the Woolsey Hall program with great anticipation. Peter Storandt   -----Original Message----- From: Karl Moyer [mailto:kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu] Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2001 2:00 PM To: piporg-l; organchat; pipechat; Anglican-music Subject: Nigel Potts     The young Kiwi organist Nigel Potts played a recital in Lancaster PA on Sunday afternoon that was just splendid.    
(back) Subject: Church on Fire Pictures added to webpage From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 17:31:09 -0400   http://novascotia.cbc.ca/editorServlets/View?filename=3Dns_lunenburg110101   some pictures of the fire can be seen on the webpage now A very sad site      
(back) Subject: Video of fire at St. John's Anglican Lunenburg NS From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 17:52:11 -0400   Note the Pipe Organ was located on both sides of the chancel, noticable in video http://www.ctvnews.com/index.html to get the video you need real player click on the above link and once on the page click on the link "Arson suspected in fire at historic church" THere is going to be more added according to the TV network    
(back) Subject: Organ Specifications Posted From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 14:03:05 -0800 (PST)   Below I paste in the final specifications for the organ at my church. Now = almost double the original size. The final chest will be completed soon, and work has = started on our new console, which began life as an Aeolian Skinner. It will retain the basic outward = appearance, but aside from the manuals and pedals and their contacts, all working components = will be new. Other than the final 2 ranks (great Twelfth and Fifteehth) everything is currently = playable from the original Klann console, but a much paired down stoplist, no couplers, etc. We = expect to make the final transition to the new console and control systems prior to Lent 2002.   St. Peter's Episcopal, Redwood City, CA Swain & Kates, 1972, 12 ranks rebuilt, revoiced, and expanded 2001-2002, 20 ranks, Paul Sahlin, = Burlingame, CA   GREAT I (6 pipe ranks)   16=92 Gedeckt (sw) 8=92 *Diapason 61 pipes 8=92 Hohl Phife (encl) 61 pipes 8=92 Gemshorn (sw) 8=92 Gemshorn Celeste (tc) (sw) 4=92 *Octave 61 pipes 4=92 Rohrfl=F6te (encl) 61 pipes 2-2/3=92 *Twelfth 61 pipes 2=92 *Fifteenth 61 pipes 1-1/3=92 Nasat (sw) II Sesquialtera (sw) IV Mixture 1-1/3=92 (sw) IV Sharp 1=92 (sw ext) 16=92 Double Trumpet (sw) 8=92 Trumpet (sw) 8=92 Oboe (sw) 4=92 Clarion (sw) Chimes Cymbelstern Swell 16=92 Swell 8=92 Swell 4=92 *exposed     SWELL ORGAN II (13 pipe ranks)   16=92 Gemshorn (unit) 8=92 Principal (unit) 8=92 Gedeckt 61 pipes 8=92 Gemshorn 73 pipes 8=92 Gemshorn Celeste (tc) 49 pipes 4=92 Principal 73 pipes 4=92 Koppelfl=F6te 73 pipes 4=92 Unda Maris II (ext) 2-2/3=92 Nasat 73 pipes 2=92 Octave (ext) 2=92 Fl=F6te (gt ext) 1-3/5=92 Terz (tc) 49 pipes 1=92 Siffl=F6te (ext) IV Mixture 1-1/3=92 244 pipes 16=92 Bassoon (tc) (unit) 8=92 Trumpet 85 pipes 8=92 Oboe 61 pipes 4=92 Clarion (ext) 4=92 Oboe (unit) General Tremulant   PEDAL ORGAN (1 pipe rank)   32=92 Acoustic Bass (unit) 16=92 Bourdon 24 pipes 16=92 Gedeckt (sw) 8=92 Diapason (gt) 8=92 Bass Flute (unit) 8=92 Gemshorn (sw) 4=92 Choralbass (gt) 4=92 Rohrfl=F6te (gt) 2=92 Koppel (sw) 16=92 Double Trumpet (sw) 8=92 Trumpet (sw) 4=92 Clarion (sw) 4=92 Oboe Clarion (sw) Chimes Great 8' Swell 8'   COMBINATION ACTION 99 memory levels adjustable crescendo record/playback transposer, etc.   Generals: 1 =96 12 (duplicated) Great: 1 =96 8, 0 Swell: 1 =96 8, 0 Pedal: 1 =96 6 (toe only) General Cancel piston only Setter piston only Great to Pedal rev. (duplicated) Swell to Pedal rev. (duplicated) Swell to Great rev. (thumb only) Full Organ rev. (duplicated) Cymbelstern rev. (toe only)       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make a great connection at Yahoo! Personals. http://personals.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Fire: St. Johns Anglican, Lunenburg NS From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 17:42:34 -0500   Dear List,   On an occasion such as this and after coming to grips with the crass stupidity of the act, my mind turns to one or two practical matters. One = is the matter of how the insurance policy reads for the building and contents =   and by extension of this, the organ. In times past I have had arguments with some in our Church about how our insurance policy is written and I did succeed in getting it changed. Quite =   typically since the organ is fixed in place it is not unusual for it to be =   considered as part of the structure and if under a policy written this way =   the sum assured is say $2m. and there is a loss and the organ that cost $30K 20 years ago now costs $600K, a congregation has no hope of erecting =   a replacement structure and replacing the organ for the sum assured. As I understand it, another kicker can be what is termed a co-insurance clause. =   If the loss is figured to be say $4m. in todays dollars and the coverage = is $2m. the insurance company can say that the Church was effectively = insuring 50% of the value themselves and they will only pay out a million dollars. A Church, if it has a valuable organ in terms of replacement cost must show the organ separately on the policy for a specific sum assured. In the event that the organ is damaged and it is deemed to be repairable = it is usual for the Insurance adjuster to seek two or three quotes for the work. It is absolutely essential that the Church get the damage professionally surveyed by, probably the original builder if that is possible, or by an extremely competent technician and all damage be meticulously documented and included in the scope of work that will be the basis for getting quotations for the restorative work. This and a = hefty bonding provision will go along way towards disqualifying the organ repair =   charlatans that are out there .   HD    
(back) Subject: More Cassette Tapes -- Organ & Choir From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 17:51:02 -0500   OHS has found a few more cassette tapes to add to the clearance of these items at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Thanks to all who have ordered. The response has been great!   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: The uninitiated and the layman audiences (was: Nigel Potts) From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Fri, 02 Nov 2001 02:23:20 +0100 (MET)   Don't you feel, Herr Dr. Moyer, that your posting regarding the "uninitated" and the "layman audiences" calls for an explanation before the "uninitiated" and the "layman audiences". I for my part, as a member of one of these groups, feel offended, especially within the context of your arrogant and disparaging formulation about the kind of players, you describe.   After reading this and knowing the person, who has written it, it is very difficult for a young performer, who puts into his playing everything, his body, his soul, his life, his power, his weakness, his love, his anger... yes, everything, to stay humble. I pray, that this will never happen. Hans-Friedrich Hell,   Karl Moyer wrote: > > He does not play like a big deal "look at me" type > player.... > As such, it may not be the most "thrilling" of playing to > the uninitiated, > and it does not yield standing ovations from layman > audiences  
(back) Subject: Re: The uninitated and the layman audiences From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Fri, 02 Nov 2001 02:39:34 +0100 (MET)   Dear list and administration,   I just mailed a message to the list, which was actually foreseen for the sender privately. I apologize for that, but the respective e-mail showed the e-mail address of the sender, as well as the recipient: PIPORG-L. So I was surprised, when I realized too late, after I had used the answer button, and the whole message went to PIPECHAT (even not to PIPORG-L) I'm afriad, that I will never understand, how this procedure really goes. Again, sorry, if I should have violated rules. But the topic, how performers should "treat" layman audiences, and whta role layman audiences really play for the success of a presenter's recital series, is probably not off topic.   Hans-Friedrich Hell  
(back) Subject: All Saints' Day in Hades, a tiny town next to Perdition From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 20:47:13 -0600   SAINT AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH DeFuniak Springs, Florida   November 1, 2001 CELEBRATION OF THE FEAST OF ALL SAINTS   HOLY EUCHARIST   Service music - Powell/Merbecke   Prelude - Joy of the Redeemed - Clarence Dickinson Introit Hymn - For all the saints, from whom their labors rest (Sine Nomine) - H 287 (verses 1-4 only) Sequence Hymn - Ye watchers and ye holy ones (Lasst uns erfreuen) - H 618 Renewal of Baptismal Vows Offertory Hymn - I sing a song of the saints of God (Grand Isle) - H 293 Eucharistic Prayer D Closing Hymn - Ye holy angels bright (Darwall's 148th) - H 625   God works in mysterious ways. I ended up playing a service for only 5, a record small All Saints' service for me. The Mardi Gras queen who politicked against my serving on the vestry and slandered me in the church community was sitting close enough for me to hit her, and had to "pass the peace" with me. I almost laughed during the offertory hymn when it spoke = of "queens". I did not take communion since she thought I was only an employee. No one even showed up to serve, so I read the lessons for the vicar. The Old Testament passage in Ecclesiasticus speaking of those = saints whose names were long forgotten was comforting - sometimes I feel as = though I have been destined for mediocrity and anonymity here. Communion did not last long enough to do the planned Ravel's Pavane on the piano.   I stayed behind to fulfill my altar guild duty for this month, which was a blessing, because a message was taken for me of a call by an organist = about an hour's drive away who had moved in the area from Orlando, and was interested in the AGO. So I went home and talked to this utterly charming man for over an hour about organs, musicians we knew in common, and the = AGO chapters in the area.   Happy All Saints' and All Souls' Days to you all,   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: Re[4]: Membership in the parish From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 21:01:58 -0600     <RMB10@aol.com> wrote: > I served a church where the pastor wouldn't let anyone sing "Battle Hymn of > the Republic" at any Patriotic because the composer was a Unitarian. I had > to scour through all sorts of books to find information on Julia Ward Howe, > and lo and behold, it was true. But where does Unitarian thought come into > that song   Presumably he wouldn't let you sing "Nearer, my God, to thee", "It came = upon the midnight clear", etc., for the same reason.   John Speller