PipeChat Digest #2479 - Saturday, November 3, 2001
 
Re: Christmas Song needed
  by "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Christmas Song needed
  by "Neil Shepherd" <neilshepherd@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Nigel Potts
  by "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Christmas Song needed
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Effect of swell shutter opening on tonality
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
The Unschooled Organist - Layman's Opinion
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Re: Christmas Song needed
  by "Edric Russell" <russ@eci.co.za>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Song needed From: "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 23:26:05 +1300   I could probably find you a copy somewhere amongst my stuff if you can't = get a copy from closer to home. I'd be surprised if it was Rutter, though. Let me know if you don't get a copy. Regards, Ross -----Original Message----- From: Joe Elliffe <jelliffe@atlantic.net> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 03 November 2001 15:44 Subject: Christmas Song needed     >I have an English priest who asks for a song >called "Little Donkey" for the Christmas Eve >Children's service- Can anyone point me to a >source > >Thanks in advance >Joe > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Song needed From: "Neil Shepherd" <neilshepherd@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 10:29:14 -0000   Definitely not Rutter! - Although I don't know who wrote it!   "Little Donkey" is an extremely simple children's song (appropriate to children in the 4 to 8 years of age range).     Neil Shepherd Organist and Director of Music, St John The Baptist, Keynsham Proprietor, West of England Music 6 Priory Road, Keynsham, Bristol BS31 2BX, UK Telephone/Fax 0117-908-2567      
(back) Subject: Re: Nigel Potts From: "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 23:54:56 +1300   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0059_01C164C2.F06B9560 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Nigel PottsI know Nigel Potts and his mother and father, having been to = =3D University with his Mum, Angela, about 42 years ago here in Wellington =3D and as both parents are members of Wellington Cathedral here. I rang =3D Angela and read her your and Peter Storandt's postings about Nigel's =3D recital. She was thrilled and asked me to email copies to Nigel, so I =3D shall. Angela is a very practical and very capable piano teacher with no = =3D histrionics herself, and Dad, Ron, is a practical, thoroughly likeable =3D person also. What can Nigel do when he's finished at Yale soon? There is = =3D no job for his special kind of talent here in New Zealand, sadly. Sometimes I feel that music has taken a wrong turn: classical musicians = =3D are dying by the mile and hardly any classical CDs are now being sold, =3D with numbers decreasing rapidly every year. Composers write stuff direct = =3D onto tape, that cannot be repeated, hummed, whistled or sung, have no =3D decent tunes and sound like cacophonous garbage to most of the people =3D "out there". Stage an orchestral concert of Stockhausen, Ligeti or =3D anything newer and people will stay away in droves. Put on an =3D all-Beethoven recital and you'll cram the Town Hall to the gunwales. I =3D remember, many years ago, the then Governor-General of New Zealand, a =3D keen amateur musician, was asked to define music. His answer, an =3D absolute classic, was, "Music is that which, having heard it the night =3D before, you whistle in the shower this morning." Re-read Imogen Holst's = =3D book "Tune" and enjoy it. I like some modern music, for sure, and in advance I reject the notion =3D of living in a dream museum world, but there has to be something for the = =3D average uneducated listener and the tune-wanting musician as well. Yes, = =3D I love Messiaen on the organ, but apart from him, what is memorable? Of = =3D North American music we NZers may hear a little Sowerby very rarely, and = =3D perhaps a wee bit of Willan or Purvis equally rarely, but nothing more, = =3D ever, except Ives's set of variations. Why is this so? Is no one =3D writing listenable music? I know some people like to maintain distinctions between "War March of =3D the Priests" and a Bull Fantasia, but who cares any more, as long people = =3D come and want to come back? Doctrinaire ideas about design, similarly, =3D seem to be past their use-by date. I want a musical organ sound, first =3D and foremost, able to play tunefully and musically most things, and I =3D couldn't give a damn about the pedalboard being straight, or the wind =3D flexible or the wind pressure being "right" to the last millimetre. =3D Years ago, a local BMus (Performance, organ) (Hons) fellow aged 23 gave = =3D a recital on a local 1880s Hill organ, demonstrating old English music =3D played with "traditional" fingering, versus "correct" fingering not =3D using the thumb (his distinctions, not mine). Apart from being bored out = =3D of my skull, I still fail to hear the difference between Mid.C on an 8ft = =3D Open Diapason played with the thumb, or another digit, or even prodded =3D with the eraser on the end of a pencil! And while I'm at it, yes, players often do play far too fast, too fast =3D for the pipes to speak, for there to be good phrasing, and for the =3D audience to follow what is being played. Listen to Widor's recording of = =3D his own Toccata, half the speed of most modern recitalists, and you'll =3D know what I mean. And even Marie-Claire Alain, and that fellow Newman, =3D play obscenely fast, making a mockery of Bach and his beautiful =3D melodies. If I, as a competent musician, can hardly hear the music for =3D the speed, no "amateur" could possibly hope to. I've heard much organ =3D music played so fast and so staccato that no pipes except extreme =3D trebles seem to be able to speak at all. I'm sure you all know what I =3D mean, and I'm more than just trying to create trouble here.=3D20 It wouldn't worry me in the slightest if someone were to play a =3D transcription, for example, of a couple of Mozart quartet slow movements = =3D in a recital of "classical organ" music, or even, dare I say it, of a =3D piece, like Zamfir, for pan flutes and organ. I only go to organ =3D recitals for the fun of it, never to be impressed by my own exclusivism = =3D and political correctness.=3D20 Now, having said all of that, which I've been wanting to for some time, = =3D and wanting again to thank you people for your kind words about a fellow = =3D NZer (though I'm a hopelessly minor talent compared with him), I'd =3D better sign off before this site goes into meltdown with the barrage =3D that's bound to follow- - - - - - - - - - Regards, Ross Wards =3D20 -----Original Message---- From: Karl Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: piporg-l <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu>; organchat =3D <organchat@egroups.com>; pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org>; =3D Anglican-music <anglican-music@list.stsams.org> Date: 02 November 2001 09:14 Subject: Nigel Potts     The young Kiwi organist Nigel Potts played a recital in Lancaster =3D PA on Sunday afternoon that was just splendid. I know the organ quite =3D well: a 1967 Schlilcker with new Great principal chorus and 16' & 32' =3D Walker digital pedal stops. Potts obviouslly spent much careful time at = =3D the organ, for we heard more from the instrument than I can recall ever = =3D hearing from a visiting recitalist. His use of the instrument for the = =3D sake of good musicainship was exemplary!   He does not play like a big deal "look at me" type player; he =3D projects the music instead of himself, keeping himself slightly in the =3D background. As such, it may not be the most "thrilling" of playing to =3D the uninitiated, and it does not yield standing ovations from layman =3D audiences, but it is ever so solid and satisfying to a person who does =3D sense good musicianship when he hears it. You never got the impression = =3D that he was slave to some pre-imposed "system" of articulation or the =3D like; it was just good, solid musicianship, with the swell pedal used =3D very, very judiciously employed to enhance phrasing, and with =3D registration that fit just right at every turn.   His major offering was Sonata 8 in A by Guilmant, and I could have = =3D listened to it all over again!! Other very interesting, and, to me, =3D unfamiliar work: two mov'ts from the Percy Whitlock organ sonata in C =3D minor, of which the Scherzetto mov't was utterly delightful on Sunday. = =3D20   I understand that he'll play a master's degree recital in Wolsey =3D Hall at Yale, where he studies with Thomas Murray, on Monday night 26 =3D Nov. I've considered going the whole way to New Haven to hear him on =3D that marvelous organ, given his repertoire, which will include the =3D entire Whilock sonata and also a transcription Potts has done of a =3D Delius orchedstral work, plus again the Guilmant Sonata 8. =3D20   This guy is a "sleeper" in our midst. Not that he's not been =3D around in significant recital venues; but he deserves more attention. = =3D20   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0059_01C164C2.F06B9560 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Nigel Potts</TITLE> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dwindows-1252"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4134.600" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I know Nigel Potts and his mother and father, having = =3D been to=3D20 University with his Mum, Angela, about 42 years ago here in Wellington =3D and as=3D20 both parents are members of Wellington Cathedral here.&nbsp;I rang =3D Angela and=3D20 read her your and Peter Storandt's postings about Nigel's recital. She =3D was=3D20 thrilled and asked me to email copies to Nigel, so I shall. Angela is a = =3D very=3D20 practical&nbsp;and very capable piano teacher with no histrionics =3D herself, and=3D20 Dad, Ron, is a practical, thoroughly likeable person also. What =3D can&nbsp;Nigel=3D20 do when he's finished at Yale soon?&nbsp;There is no job for his special = =3D kind of=3D20 talent here in New Zealand, sadly.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Sometimes I feel that music has taken a wrong turn: = =3D classical=3D20 musicians are dying by the mile and hardly any classical CDs are now =3D being sold,=3D20 with numbers decreasing rapidly every year. Composers write stuff direct = =3D onto=3D20 tape, that cannot be repeated, hummed, whistled or sung, have no decent = =3D tunes=3D20 and sound like cacophonous garbage to most of the people "out there". =3D Stage an=3D20 orchestral concert of Stockhausen, Ligeti or anything newer and people =3D will stay=3D20 away in droves. Put on an all-Beethoven recital and you'll cram the Town = =3D Hall to=3D20 the gunwales. I remember, many years ago, the then Governor-General of =3D New=3D20 Zealand, a keen amateur musician, was asked to define music. His answer, = =3D an=3D20 absolute classic, was, "Music is that which, having heard it the night =3D before,=3D20 you whistle in the shower this morning." Re-read Imogen Holst's book =3D "Tune" and=3D20 enjoy it.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I like some modern music, for sure, and in advance I = =3D reject=3D20 the notion of living in a dream museum world, but there has to be =3D something for=3D20 the average uneducated listener and the tune-wanting musician as well. =3D Yes, I=3D20 love Messiaen on the organ, but apart from&nbsp;him, what is memorable? = =3D Of North=3D20 American music we NZers may hear a little Sowerby very rarely, and =3D perhaps a wee=3D20 bit of Willan or Purvis equally rarely, but nothing more, ever, = except=3D20 Ives's&nbsp; set of variations. Why is this so? Is no one writing =3D listenable=3D20 music?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I know some people like to maintain = distinctions=3D20 between&nbsp;"War March of the Priests" and a Bull Fantasia, but who =3D cares any=3D20 more, as long people come and want to come back? Doctrinaire ideas about = =3D design,=3D20 similarly, seem to be past their use-by date. I want a musical organ =3D sound,=3D20 first and foremost, able to play tunefully and musically most things, =3D and I=3D20 couldn't give a damn about the pedalboard being straight, or the wind =3D flexible=3D20 or the wind pressure being "right" to the last millimetre. Years ago, a = =3D local=3D20 BMus (Performance, organ) (Hons) fellow aged 23 gave a recital on a =3D local 1880s=3D20 Hill organ, demonstrating old English music played with "traditional" =3D fingering,=3D20 versus "correct" fingering not using the thumb (his distinctions, not =3D mine).=3D20 Apart from being bored out of my skull, I still fail to hear the =3D difference=3D20 between Mid.C on an 8ft Open Diapason played with the thumb, or another = =3D digit,=3D20 or even prodded with the eraser on the end of a pencil!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>And while I'm at it, yes, players often do play far = =3D too fast,=3D20 too fast for the&nbsp;pipes to speak, for there to be good phrasing, and = =3D for the=3D20 audience to follow what is being played. Listen to Widor's recording of = =3D his own=3D20 Toccata, half the speed of most modern recitalists, and you'll know what = =3D I mean.=3D20 And even Marie-Claire Alain, and that fellow Newman, play obscenely =3D fast, making=3D20 a mockery of Bach and his beautiful melodies. If I, as a competent =3D musician, can=3D20 hardly hear the music for the speed, no "amateur" could possibly hope =3D to. I've=3D20 heard much organ music played so fast and so staccato that no pipes =3D except=3D20 extreme trebles seem to be able to speak at all. I'm sure you all know =3D what I=3D20 mean, and I'm more than just trying to create trouble here. =3D </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>It wouldn't worry me in the slightest if someone =3D were to play=3D20 a transcription, for example, of a couple of Mozart quartet slow =3D movements in a=3D20 recital of "classical organ" music, or even, dare I say it, of a piece, = =3D like=3D20 Zamfir, for pan flutes and organ. I only go to organ recitals for the =3D fun of it,=3D20 never to be impressed by my own exclusivism and political = correctness.=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Now, having said all of that, which I've been =3D wanting to for=3D20 some time, and wanting again to thank you people for your kind words =3D about a=3D20 fellow NZer (though I'm a hopelessly minor talent compared with him), =3D I'd better=3D20 sign off before this site goes into meltdown with the barrage that's =3D bound to=3D20 follow- - - - - - - - - -</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Regards,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Ross Wards</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>&nbsp;</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px = =3D solid"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><B>-----Original =3D Message----</B><BR><B>From:=3D20 </B>Karl Moyer &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu">kmoyer@marauder.millersv= =3D ille.edu</A>&gt;<BR><B>To:=3D20 </B>piporg-l &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu">piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu= =3D </A>&gt;;=3D20 organchat &lt;<A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:organchat@egroups.com">organchat@egroups.com</A>&gt;; = =3D pipechat=3D20 &lt;<A =3D href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A>&gt;;=3D20=   Anglican-music &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:anglican-music@list.stsams.org">anglican-music@list.stsams= =3D ..org</A>&gt;<BR><B>Date:=3D20 </B>02 November 2001 09:14<BR><B>Subject: </B>Nigel=3D20 Potts<BR><BR></DIV></FONT>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The young Kiwi organist =3D Nigel=3D20 Potts played a recital in Lancaster PA on Sunday afternoon that was =3D just=3D20 splendid. &nbsp;I know the organ quite well: a 1967 Schlilcker with =3D new Great=3D20 principal chorus and 16' &amp; 32' Walker digital pedal stops. = Potts=3D20 obviouslly spent much careful time at the organ, for we heard more =3D from the=3D20 instrument than I can recall <B>ever</B> hearing from a visiting =3D recitalist.=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;His use of the instrument for the sake of good =3D musicainship=3D20 was exemplary!<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;He does not play like a big =3D deal "look=3D20 at me" type player; he projects the music instead of himself, keeping = =3D himself=3D20 slightly in the background. &nbsp;As such, it may not be the most =3D "thrilling"=3D20 of playing to the uninitiated, and it does not yield standing ovations = =3D from=3D20 layman audiences, but it is ever so solid and satisfying to a person =3D who does=3D20 sense good musicianship when he hears it. &nbsp;&nbsp;You never got =3D the=3D20 impression that he was slave to some pre-imposed "system" of =3D articulation or=3D20 the like; &nbsp;it was just good, solid musicianship, with the swell =3D pedal=3D20 used very, very judiciously employed to enhance phrasing, and with=3D20 registration that fit just right at every =3D turn.<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;His=3D20 major offering was Sonata 8 in A by Guilmant, and I could have =3D listened to it=3D20 all over again!! &nbsp;&nbsp;Other very interesting, and, to me, =3D unfamiliar=3D20 work: &nbsp;two mov'ts from the Percy Whitlock organ sonata in C =3D minor, of=3D20 which the Scherzetto mov't was utterly delightful on Sunday.=3D20 &nbsp;<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I understand that he'll play a =3D master's degree=3D20 recital in Wolsey Hall at Yale, where he studies with Thomas Murray, =3D on Monday=3D20 night 26 Nov. &nbsp;I've considered going the whole way to New Haven =3D to hear=3D20 him on that marvelous organ, given his repertoire, which will include = =3D the=3D20 entire Whilock sonata and also a transcription Potts has done of a =3D Delius=3D20 orchedstral work, plus again the Guilmant Sonata 8.=3D20 &nbsp;<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This guy is a "sleeper" &nbsp;in our =3D midst.=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;Not that he's not been around in significant recital =3D venues;=3D20 &nbsp;but he deserves more attention.=3D20 =3D &nbsp;<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Cordially,<BR><BR= =3D >&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Karl=3D20 E. Moyer<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lancaster PA=3D20 </BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0059_01C164C2.F06B9560--      
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Song needed From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 10:46:55 -0000   Little Donkey is by Eric Boswell published Chappell and Co London 1959. Quite well known in UK - I think it was in the top ten at one time. Its a nice simple little Christmas song.   HTH   Bruce Miles     mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk ----- Original Message ----- From: "Joe Elliffe" <jelliffe@atlantic.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, November 03, 2001 2:47 AM Subject: Christmas Song needed     > I have an English priest who asks for a song > called "Little Donkey" for the Christmas Eve > Children's service- Can anyone point me to a > source        
(back) Subject: Re: Effect of swell shutter opening on tonality From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 11:04:08 -0000   Jim,   >Your ears are not deceiving you. Bruce. The physics of why this occurs would >take pages and really doesn't belong on pipechat. The fact that we hear = it >sustains its actual happening and our ears recognize that the sound = becomes >much, much brighter before it becomes louder as the shades are opened = from >fully closed, and conversely the high frequencies are the last of the >spectrum to be diminished.   Many thanks for your detailed reply - you confirm in the main what I thought. However the info that the high frequencies are heard prior to any significant increase in volume is new - I shall have to do some more experimenting with this. It is rather at odds with my perception that the final few degrees of shutter opening produces a final blaze of upper harmonics. On second thoughts this may be due to the differences between = the Wurlitzer 'one-by-one' shutter system and the usual Compton whiffle-tree arrangement where all the shutters open gradually together. This last is what I have been listening to. There is obviously a difference between the sound transmission properties of a single opening a few inches wide and several openings which may be less than a half inch wide. Also whether or not the shutter edges are grooved will have an effect. I have always = thought that it is only when the tranmission path from pipes to ears becomes line-of-sight that you hear the full spectrum of sound.   > Your analogy of a volume control on EORG's is also right on. Upper end EORG > builders emulated this effect to a degree by adding capacitance on the swell > shoe. When the shoe was slightly depressed, the attenuated high frequencies > were returned to the sound field before any noticeable decibel increase was > heard. It gave a more realistic pipe organ approach of swell boxes through > speaker cabinets. This is not at all difficult to do on a physical = organ but > I must defer to your expertise in the virtual computer organ.   There is no great problem over reproducing these effects on a 'soundfont' organ. You can use a utility like Mid-ox to intercept volume change = messages and from them generate and interpolate messages which alter the filter settings in the soundcard before also passing on the original volume = change message. I hope to put some detail on on this and possibly a sound clip or two to demonstrate it on the misc page on my website later today.   >My electronics > skills outstrip my programming skills, and my advancing age is causing both > to wane increasingly.   Join the club - on advancing age I mean. I spent 22 years as an army = signals technician later foreman of signals and technical officer. But it's all a long time ago.   > Allow me to congratulate you on your creation of the computer organ. I was > very impressed with your progress and intend to someday incorporate some of > the voices in my old Artisan. If you can add this phenomenon to your = sound font spectrum, it will add even > more realism to the final product.   I blush, but thanks. I have just added a Clarinet and Orchestral Oboe - to the 'Stops only' version on the misc page. 'Final product' you say - I = doubt if this will ever happen. !!   Best wishes, Bruce Miles       bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk        
(back) Subject: The Unschooled Organist - Layman's Opinion From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 06:57:47 EST     --part1_108.7e6b03a.291535bb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I have been reading the "uninitiated" letters for some time now and can = only related that: our church bought a Walker enhanced Rodgers 925 a number of years ago. = The room has superb acoustics and we presented a concert, advertised widely but attended only by parishioners and area AGO members. Some of the latter could be easily identified by their scores and pencils = in hand. Several years later, another church bought a mechanical action, = north European pipe organ (the organist had studied there) and presented several =   concerts. A member of that congregation later told me: "no matter who = plays it, or what they play, it all sounds the same; we spent all that money and =   don't have the magnificant cathedral sounds of the organ in your church. It's a real disappointment." Uninitiated, but interested enough to = attend; one of the paying customers who is not satisfied! Is that organ a = memorial to the organist, himself? Are we locking out others by locking ourselves = in some narrow past of replica antique organs. In all of this, " Who are we playing for?" The answer seems to be "Ourselves." No wonder we are so = few in number. Never mind the occasionally well attended concerts by certain organists, here and there. Across the board, classical organ concerts do =   not draw except from our own. It just ain't interesting (entertaining) enough. Funny, tho, they pack over a thousand into those Dickenson High School theater organ concerts a half dozen times a year, year after year. =   One reason, they aren't just organists, they are those uninitiated people = who want to listen to organ music that doesn't bore them. But, if the artist does not use the sound capabilities of that organ in an interesting = manner, they will complain. Of course, those theater organists are not locked = into using only certain "accepted registrations" of ages ago.   --part1_108.7e6b03a.291535bb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial Black" LANG=3D"0">I = have been reading the "uninitiated"&nbsp; letters for some time now and = can only related that:<BR> our church bought a Walker enhanced Rodgers 925 a number of years = ago.&nbsp; The room has superb acoustics<BR> and we presented a concert,&nbsp; advertised widely but attended only by = parishioners and area AGO members.<BR> Some of the latter could be easily identified by their scores and pencils = in hand.&nbsp; Several years later, another church bought a mechanical = action, north European pipe organ (the organist had studied there) and = presented several concerts.&nbsp; A member of that congregation later told = me: "no matter who plays it, or what they play, it all sounds the same; we = spent all that money and don't have the magnificant cathedral sounds of = the organ in your church.&nbsp; It's a real disappointment."&nbsp; = Uninitiated, but interested enough to attend; one of the paying customers = who is not satisfied!&nbsp; Is that organ a memorial to the organist, = himself? Are we locking out others by locking ourselves in some narrow = past of replica antique organs. In all of this, " Who are we playing = for?"&nbsp; The answer seems to be "Ourselves."&nbsp; No wonder we are so = few in number.&nbsp; Never mind the occasionally well attended concerts by = certain organists, here and there.&nbsp; Across the board, cla   --part1_108.7e6b03a.291535bb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Song needed From: "Edric Russell" <russ@eci.co.za> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 14:20:07 +0200   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C16472.A3ADA4C0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable     ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Ross Wards=3D20 To: PipeChat=3D20 Sent: Saturday, November 03, 2001 12:26 PM Subject: Re: Christmas Song needed     Go to the following site and you will find the words and a real audio = =3D file of the music. It was quite popular in the 60's in South Africa but = =3D is really a childrens song. Quite cute though. I hope this helps. =3D http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/tweenies/songtime/songs/l/littledonkey.sht= =3D ml   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C16472.A3ADA4C0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4134.600" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3DTheShieling@xtra.co.nz =3D href=3D3D"mailto:TheShieling@xtra.co.nz">Ross=3D20 Wards</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">PipeChat</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Saturday, November 03, = =3D 2001 12:26=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: Christmas = Song=3D20 needed</DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial>Go to the following site and you will find the = =3D words and=3D20 a real audio file of the music.&nbsp; It was quite popular in the 60's = =3D in=3D20 South Africa but is really a childrens song.&nbsp; Quite cute =3D though.&nbsp; I=3D20 hope this helps.</FONT><BR><FONT face=3D3DArial><A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/tweenies/songtime/songs/l/littledo= =3D nkey.shtml">http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/tweenies/songtime/songs/l/litt= =3D ledonkey.shtml</A></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C16472.A3ADA4C0--