PipeChat Digest #2482 - Saturday, November 3, 2001
 
Re: Space found in organ!
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: The uninitiated and the layman audiences (LONG!)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
The Layman and the Professional/Mediocrity vs. Excellence
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Space found in organ!
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Space found in organ!
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Space found in organ!
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Space found in organ! From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 00:11:04 -0000   OK then! here are the specs for my organ as they are now, so you can all dream up exciting expansions in my little bit of space!     Pedal 1 Bourdon 16 2 Quint 10 2/3 3 Flute Bass 8 4 Octave Quint 5 1/3 5 Octave Flute 4   Great 6 Open Diapason 8 7 Lieblich Gedact 8 8 Dulciana 8 9 Principal 4 10 Wald Flute 4 11 Mixture II   Swell 12 Geigen Principal 8 13 Stopped Diapason 8 14 Salicional 8 15 Gemshorn 4 16 Twelfth 2 2/3 17 Fifteenth 2 18 Oboe 8   Swell to Great Swell to Pedal Swell Octave to Great Swell Suboctave to Great Swell Octave Swell Suboctave Great to Pedal Swell Octave to Pedal Balanced Swell pedal 4 pistons to Great and Pedal 4 pistons to Swell Pistons for Gt-Pd, Sw-Gt   There is also a photo if you follow this link (hopefully it will work!) http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/pic.exe?rec_index=3DN14669&no=3D1   As you'll see, it's built in two 'towers' either side of a window. The great and pedal are in the left hand tower, and the swell in the right. = The vacant space is underneath the swell box on the right. The case is really just a frontage and isn't a supporting structure in any way. There are no tops to it either on the top of the towers or in the central casing (which holds the bellows and blower)     I'll let you all get thinking then! Looking forward to recieving suggestions!   Steve    
(back) Subject: Re: The uninitiated and the layman audiences (LONG!) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 03 Nov 2001 19:01:36 -0500   In the process of writing about the fine recital Nigel Potts played thi= s past Sunday afternoon in Lancaster, I seem to have stirred a hornet's nest with my passing comments about the "uninitiated" and "layman audiences." Permit me a number of follow-up comments.   1. I have no wish to offend anyone with any of my comments, and if I did, permit me to apologize.   2. There is nothing wrong per se about standing ovations. I've received a few. So did Herr Hell's famous son Felix when he played a recital at my church. It was a delight to have him play here, and knowing now what I do know about his playing, I would be pleased to have him play here again. Bu= t I must hasten to add that those very kindly people who have stood at the conclusion of my recitals did so, at least in some cases, on bases other than matters of fine musicianship. They are laymen music lovers, uninforme= d and ignorant and in a number of cases uninitiated--I did not say stupid!!--of the details that go into fine playing, but they found somethin= g in my playing that brought them to their feet. Likewise did my church's audience rise to their feet when Felix Hell played for us, and I eagerly joined them.=20 This is not to insult Felix's or my audiences; it simply states facts. Do I get angry when such uninitiated music lovers applaud at "the wrong time" in a multi-movement work? Not at all!!! I'm thankful to know that I am being heard by persons who are relatively new to concert deportment and thus, I hope, are being "brought into the fold" of finer music!! I don't disparage them when I consider them uninitiated! Sometimes that's what the= y are!! But I love them!! And I'm glad they are there.   3. There is nothing wrong nor arrogant nor disparaging =8B I quote the words from one of the messages that came in response to mine =8B to identifying people for what they are. I am a layman in matters of theology= , baseball, chemistry, politics, animal husbandry, and perhaps a thousand other fields. To refer to laymen music lovers as laymen is just honest, accurate discussion. Part of this problem, however, is so well reflected i= n a common American parlance in which Person 1 asks person 2 how he liked the concert. "It was a good concert," too often answers Person 2, which of course does not answer the question but instead makes a quality judgment. "If I liked, it, therefore, it was good." (!!!) The problem: we are all too accustomed to saying this and then slowly, subtly believing that what we said is true, simply because we said it. Put another way: if we say it was a good concert, we come to think that, by golly, it was a good concert. That, of course, is not necessarily true, whether the subject is wine, political leaders, fingerings for a Reger fugue, tires for a Ford Explorer, -- or concerts, But we are too accustomed to thinking that, because we like it, therefore it is good. One respondent fell headlong into another version of this trap: "How can 18,000 screaming, cheering fans...be wrong? The realities are, of course, that quality or even justice is not always necessarily assured by those present and "votin." whether with ballots, the applause meter, etc. . It is well to recall that Jesus lost the popular, uninformed vote. We need not be insulted at being referred to as a layman when one is, i= n fact, precisely that. We are all laymen in many regards, and on most cases, such defensiveness is not called for, any more than I should be defensive simply because I am a layman and Jamie Moyer is a professional at baseball. =20   4. One respondent accuses my comments as being "elitist." I recommend to every one's reading William Henry's classic book _In Defense of Elitism_, a book, which might well change your life. Here, as with point No. 3 above, some of us, proudly wearing a badge of populism, have so hoodwinked ourselves into thinking that quality is best determined by popular vote or consensus, including audience reaction, that we disregard more objective standards in favor of our own standards, which too often amount to little more than whether or not we enjoyed it. Henry, for example, shows how jur= y awards reflect this problem.   5. Much of this discussion turns on what we might classify as two somewhat opposite views on the purpose of musical performance. This problem arises in any performing art, as opposed to an art form which the originating artist leaves in material form. Contrary to that, music requires some othe= r person(s) to bring the original creator's expression to life. One view understands performance as doing all it can to convey the composer's purposes to listeners, as closely as possible as though the playwright, composer, etc. himself/herself were there and making the work come to life. I should now "show my hand": I belong to this group, and whe= n I play Bach or Franck or Scheidt or Reger et al, I try as best I am able, given my personal limitations and those of the instrument and acoustical, environment where I play, etc., to make the musical experience for my listeners as close as possible to what the composer had in mind for them. This is an academic approach, though surely Robert Glasgow, Thomas Murray, or Peter Sykes, to name just three, have shows how such an academic attitude can most successfully result in riveting performances that "come alive," especially in the French romantic (Glasgow), English and American romantic (Murray), or Reger (Sykes, as at the Steinmeyer in Altoona PA) repertoire. (Do not mis-interpret this comment; nothing here is to sugges= t that these wonderful performers are irresponsible or less than successful with other styles; I simply quote ONE of their particularly outstanding performance styles per person.) One can name many more in this category who have made great music "come alive" for huge audiences over many years: Martin Jean, David Craighead, Robert Noehren, Robert Baker, E. Power Biggs--the list could go on and on. Surely many of my present readers have seen and participated in standing ovations to one or another of these performers. The other view understands a composer's output as the basis for the performer's self-expression, etc. This is more personal and less academic= .. One of my respondents wrote, "....who puts into his playing everything, his body, his soul, his life, his power, his weakness, his love, his anger..." but fails to include "his intellect" or the evidence of history. What's primary in this view of performance is the performer in the present moment and place. In psychological terms, this respondent claims a right-brain priority to musical performance. So did Pagannini, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Virgil Fox, and at least to a degree Franz Liszt--again, we could name many others. Music of Lizst's music is regarded highly by historians, of course, and when my family and I visited in Bayreuth in June 2000, I went out of my way to visit Liszt's tomb there and to take pictures of it, given my high regard for his work and music. But I do find it interesting how history so often records the work of many in this second category of mine with an implied smirk, especially when compared with Schumann, Wagner, Verdi, Bach, Palestrina, etc. How do performers "milk" -- I am not making up this term: it is one handed to me by others -- their audiences for the sake of the "look-at-me" attitude? Gottschalk did it by "juicing" harmonic practices and fast, rapid filigree around popular melodies, and his "The Last Hope" will remain a common reference point for such music making. Most of us know how Virgil Fox did it.=20 These performers -- or sometimes composer/performers-- put themselves primary and the composer secondary. Instead of hoping that the composer's music will pass through them to the listener, they intend to "interpret" th= e composer's music through their own selves and for their own purposes. Wido= r was so critical of organists who ripped off certain of his works at break-neck speed, but many self-indulgent performers care little what Widor said about his own music and continue to rip off his works in a way just opposite of what he indicated. I need to stop short here of stating that s= o doing is wrong; I can only say that I do not hope to play that way and prefer to hear others who do not so greatly put themselves between the composer and my listening experience. In this regard, Nigel Potts "filled my bill" perfectly.   6. The layman audience cannot know these finesse items regarding any particular style or composition unless someone teaches them. Now comes a very difficult discussion: should the performance merely "entertain," or, in Handel's words, should it "make them better?" Our society is so entertainment-crazy, even to the point of "entertainment evangelism" in churches and news media who increasingly dumb down the facts --- a local TV station in Lancaster calls a four or five minute discussion of a topic a= n "in-depth report" ---!!!! ---- that too many of our society have no concept, much less a wish, to be "stretched," to be "inspired," or to be made better thoruogh classical music performance. Too often we're more hooked on hero worship than fine artistry. Performers, preachers, churc= h musicians, college professors, etc, who simply hand "audiences" things tha= t confirm them AS THEY ARE do not make for a better society. By comparison, when I heard Nigel Potts last Sunday playing Guilmant Sonata 8, I was not simply entertained, though I will admit to being almost "transported," so lovely was his music-making; but his performance challenged me in a way that, with such repeated experiences, makes me a finer person. Louis Moreau Gottschalk cared less about "making them better;" he wanted their money and his ego trip, and he got both, too!! So did Virgil Fox. It may be that both "communicated" liberally with their audiences and sent them away smiling, but is any such popularity a sign of high quality? No. Sadl= y enough, sometimes it's a sign of skill in manipulating an audience. It's just like United Airlines' ad about "the friendly skies" cannot gainsay the fact that that United and most of the other airlines have NOT taken steps the federal gov't may need to take to assure greater "friendliness" in the skies that can more reasonably assure our safety. This comment about stron= g popular acceptance of performances of doubtful value is a "hard sell" and can be predicted to bring any number of knee-jerk reactions, including here on line, particularly from those who enjoy being manipulated. (I am being brutally frank,, but if you think this is not a factor, think again!!)   The supposed dichotomy between "academic" and "popular" concerts and recitals is a false one. "Academic" recitals can be thrilling beyond measure, and "popular" recitals can be either boring or just plain stupid and even an insult to the average "layman" audience. St. Paul's comment in I Cor 14;15 is a good guideline here: to do it with spirit but with the mind also, i.e., to balance left brain and right brain in our performances and to bring BOTH to a very high level of sophistication. Too many "virtuoso" performances tilt too far to the emotional, self-indulgent side of this issue, to the expense of concern both for finer musicianship and fo= r helping to mold audiences into more perceptive music lovers.   So let me repeat: Nigel Potts did not get into this virtuoso, look-at-me type of self promotion. He became a real servant of the music itself, and as such, he let us hear Reger, Guilmant, Percy Whitlock et al o= n their own terms and not on Potts'. And while it was "academic" to the extent that Potts had studied the works and the styles and then thought the composers' thoughts after them, it was far from boring. Indeed, I could listen to it all over again--and hope to at Yale on 26 Nov.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer LancasterPA    
(back) Subject: The Layman and the Professional/Mediocrity vs. Excellence From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 20:05:29 EST     --part1_98.1cb1c801.2915ee59_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I will admit that I have not followed this thread from the beginning. But =   one poster pointed out that a "listener" could tell the difference between =   organs in nearby parishes.   My sincere wish is that all church musicians, regardless of education and background and, yes, experience, will strive to do their very best -- = seeking to play or sing or strum as excellently as possible.   Having dealt with this issue recently on the staff level (I'll elucidate below), I am becoming more and more convinced of the importance of PREPARATION, which includes practice, rehearsal, study -- all of it. If = more musicians would simply spend more time preparing for their worship responsibilities, regardless of style, more worship experiences would be enlivened.   Now, to my staff issues: I had a very heated disagreement this week with = 2 of our staff members (not the senior pastor). We all sat down together in =   the sanctuary and went after it. The superficial issue is that they have planned to do a children's "musical" for Christmas, basically against my wishes. Whether the intent was there or not, they crossed into my area. Enough of that.   The REAL issue that surfaced in our heated discussion (which was long overdue) was "quality" and what definition of it should prevail = (particularly in worship and musical presentations). The other 2 staffer do not necessarily believe that everything we do must be done well. They fell = just short of branding what I do as somehow less than holy, less than personal, =   less than uplifting and meaningful because I attempt to do it very well. = I would not let them pin that on me or the work we have done these past 7 = years.   I am not backing down on this one. In our church, we have the resources = and folks to produce excellent music and worship experiences, and it is my sincere desire that we honor that trust from God. Not to mention, my Senior Pastor and the Staff/ Parish Relations Committee (i.e. Personnel) = have repeatedly affirmed my ministry in this place year after year.   Whether they carry out the plan to have a musical remains to be seen. I = have said to their faces that it will not succeed because it is wrong. Not to mention, they are not putting a whole lot of effort into it.   Why I have not done musicals to this point is for another thread at some other time.   People KNOW the difference between quality and mediocrity.   Neil Brown   --part1_98.1cb1c801.2915ee59_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>I will admit that I have not followed this thread from the = beginning. &nbsp;But one poster pointed out that a "listener" could tell = the difference between organs in nearby parishes. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>My sincere wish is that all church musicians, regardless of education = and background and, yes, experience, will strive to do their very best -- = seeking to play or sing or strum as excellently as possible. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Having dealt with this issue recently on the staff level (I'll = elucidate below), I am becoming more and more convinced of the importance = of PREPARATION, which includes practice, rehearsal, study -- all of it. = &nbsp;If more musicians would simply spend more time preparing for their = worship responsibilities, regardless of style, more worship experiences = would be enlivened. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Now, to my staff issues: &nbsp;I had a very heated disagreement this = week with 2 of our staff members (not the senior pastor). &nbsp;We all sat = down together in the sanctuary and went after it. &nbsp;The superficial = issue is that they have planned to do a children's "musical" for = Christmas, basically against my wishes. &nbsp;Whether the intent was there = or not, they crossed into my area. Enough of that. <BR> <BR>The REAL issue that surfaced in our heated discussion (which was long overdue) was "quality" and what definition of it should prevail = (particularly in worship and musical presentations). &nbsp;The other 2 = staffer do not necessarily believe that everything we do must be done = well. &nbsp;&nbsp;They fell just short of branding what I do as somehow = less than holy, less than personal, less than uplifting and meaningful = because I attempt to do it very well. &nbsp;I would not let them pin that = on me or the work we have done these past 7 years. <BR> <BR>I am not backing down on this one. &nbsp;In our church, we have the = resources and folks to produce excellent music and worship experiences, = and it is my sincere desire that we honor that trust from God. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Not to mention, my Senior Pastor and the Staff/ Parish = Relations Committee (i.e. Personnel) have repeatedly affirmed my ministry = in this place year after year. <BR> <BR>Whether they carry out the plan to have a musical remains to be seen. = &nbsp;I have said to their faces that it will not succeed because it is = wrong. Not to mention, they are not putting a whole lot of effort into it. <BR> <BR>Why I have not done musicals to this point is for another thread at = some other time. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>People KNOW the difference between quality and mediocrity. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Neil Brown</FONT></HTML>   --part1_98.1cb1c801.2915ee59_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Space found in organ! From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Sat, 03 Nov 2001 20:35:59 -0500       Stephen Barker wrote: > > OK then! here are the specs for my organ as they are now, so you can all > dream up exciting expansions in my little bit of space!   > I'll let you all get thinking then! Looking forward to recieving > suggestions! >   With tongue firmly planted in cheek (or foot in mouth), I humbly offer the following suggested enhancements to the organ. :)   Stan http://www.theatreorgans.com/mississippi/jacksonkimball/trapsx.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Space found in organ! From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2001 20:39:11 EST   A pedal 8' Open metal  
(back) Subject: Re: Space found in organ! From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 03 Nov 2001 17:46:15 -0800     --------------CC30E17F1BE5677D41B54444 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Probably all you have room for is   (1) a 49-note chest for a celeste rank to go with the Swell Salicional, = or   (2) a 12-note offset chest to give you a 16' Bassoon extension in the = Pedals from the Oboe, or   (3) maybe a 49-note Tierce from tenor C to go with the Swell Twelfth.   Cheers,   Bud   Stephen Barker wrote:   > OK then! here are the specs for my organ as they are now, so you can all > dream up exciting expansions in my little bit of space! > > Pedal 1 Bourdon 16 > 2 Quint 10 2/3 > 3 Flute Bass 8 > 4 Octave Quint 5 1/3 > 5 Octave Flute 4 > > Great 6 Open Diapason 8 > 7 Lieblich Gedact 8 > 8 Dulciana 8 > 9 Principal 4 > 10 Wald Flute 4 > 11 Mixture II > > Swell 12 Geigen Principal 8 > 13 Stopped Diapason 8 > 14 Salicional 8 > 15 Gemshorn 4 > 16 Twelfth 2 2/3 > 17 Fifteenth 2 > 18 Oboe 8 > > Swell to Great > Swell to Pedal > Swell Octave to Great > Swell Suboctave to Great > Swell Octave > Swell Suboctave > Great to Pedal > Swell Octave to Pedal > Balanced Swell pedal > 4 pistons to Great and Pedal > 4 pistons to Swell > Pistons for Gt-Pd, Sw-Gt > > There is also a photo if you follow this link (hopefully it will work!) > http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/pic.exe?rec_index=3DN14669&no=3D1 > > As you'll see, it's built in two 'towers' either side of a window. The > great and pedal are in the left hand tower, and the swell in the right. = The > vacant space is underneath the swell box on the right. The case is = really > just a frontage and isn't a supporting structure in any way. There are = no > tops to it either on the top of the towers or in the central casing = (which > holds the bellows and blower) > > I'll let you all get thinking then! Looking forward to recieving > suggestions! > > Steve > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   --------------CC30E17F1BE5677D41B54444 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Probably all you have room for is <p>(1) a 49-note chest for a celeste rank to go with&nbsp; the Swell = Salicional, or <p>(2) a 12-note offset chest to give you a 16' Bassoon extension in the Pedals from the Oboe, or <p>(3) maybe a 49-note Tierce from tenor C to go with the Swell Twelfth. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>Stephen Barker wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>OK then! here are the specs for my organ as they are now, so you can all <br>dream up exciting expansions in my little bit of space! <p>Pedal&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Bourdon&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 16 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Quint&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 10 2/3 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 3&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Flute Bass&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Octave Quint&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 5 1/3 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 5&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Octave Flute&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4 <p>Great&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 6&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Open Diapason&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 7&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Lieblich Gedact&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Dulciana&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 9&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Principal&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 10&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Wald = Flute&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Mixture&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&n= bsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; II <p>Swell&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 12&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Geigen Principal&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 13&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Stopped Diapason&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 14&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Salicional&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 15&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Gemshorn&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 16&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Twelfth&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&n= bsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2 2/3 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 17&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Fifteenth&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2 <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 18&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Oboe&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8 <p>Swell to Great <br>Swell to Pedal <br>Swell Octave to Great <br>Swell Suboctave to Great <br>Swell Octave <br>Swell Suboctave <br>Great to Pedal <br>Swell Octave to Pedal <br>Balanced Swell pedal <br>4 pistons to Great and Pedal <br>4 pistons to Swell <br>Pistons for Gt-Pd, Sw-Gt <p>There is also a photo if you follow this link (hopefully it will work!) <br><a = href=3D"http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/pic.exe?rec_index=3DN14669&no= =3D1">http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/pic.exe?rec_index=3DN14669&amp;= no=3D1</a> <p>As you'll see, it's built in two 'towers' either side of a = window.&nbsp; The <br>great and pedal are in the left hand tower, and the swell in the right.&nbsp; The <br>vacant space is underneath the swell box on the right.&nbsp; The case is really <br>just a frontage and isn't a supporting structure in any way.&nbsp; There are no <br>tops to it either on the top of the towers or in the central casing (which <br>holds the bellows and blower) <p>I'll let you all get thinking then!&nbsp; Looking forward to recieving <br>suggestions! <p>Steve <p>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" <br>PipeChat:&nbsp; A&nbsp; discussion List for pipe/digital organs &amp; related topics <br>HOMEPAGE : <a = href=3D"http://www.pipechat.org">http://www.pipechat.org</a> <br>List: <a = href=3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org</a> <br>Administration:&nbsp; <a = href=3D"mailto:admin@pipechat.org">mailto:admin@pipechat.org</a> <br>Subscribe/Unsubscribe:&nbsp; <a = href=3D"mailto:requests@pipechat.org">mailto:requests@pipechat.org</a></blo= ckquote> </html>   --------------CC30E17F1BE5677D41B54444--