PipeChat Digest #2484 - Sunday, November 4, 2001
 
Re: The uninitiated and the layman audiences (short)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: The Feast of Richard Hooker in small-town America
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Organist Position,   Macedonia  ,  Ohio
  by <EppleyB@cs.com>
Temperament
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
consequences
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Music for Advent
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Temperament
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Sunday in Octave of All Saints' Day - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA  (
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Effect of swell shutter opening on tonality
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Concert at Oberlin last Night
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Donkey Carol
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Sunday following ASD - out of the primordial ooze . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Concert at Oberlin Last Night
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Concert at Oberlin Last Night
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The uninitiated and the layman audiences (short) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 06:45:18 -0600   As the last recitalist of the church's series said in response to people applauding between movements: She welcomes all the applause she can get - it beats the alternative.   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: The Feast of Richard Hooker in small-town America From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 06:52:47 -0600   My next mission, should I choose to accomplish it, is to make all the "sacramental" flower pots that have accumulated in the sacristy disappear this month, while training an acolyte (guess I will have to exorcise him first, per Bud's suggestion) to sing Malcolm Archer's chant for the Advent wreath prayers.   And I'm afraid to be too close to the baptismal font - I am convinced that primordial slime may be incubating therein. Who said space is the final frontier?   Glenda Sutton (gotta go forth and do it again this morning)   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com>   > Glenda, has anyone checked the water in the Springs lately for alien life-forms?        
(back) Subject: Organist Position, Macedonia , Ohio From: <EppleyB@cs.com> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 08:23:55 EST     --part1_14b.37d6b97.29169b6b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Shepard Road Christian Church Macedonia, OHio One service, 1045 MIxed SAB Choir Mixed service musically, tradtional (Chalice Hymnal) and some Praise Choruses Traditional Protestant Denomination service format Payment is 50$ weekly for one service and one rehearsal, may be negotiable = to 70$ There is much flexibility in this job, there are several built in subs available and no contract or specific requirements as far as what the Organist/Pianist plays for service music. This is a job for someone who needs/wants to play, but also needs/wants a church that is flexible and accommodating with both requirements and scheduling. email to above address (eppleyb@cs.com) or call church at 330-467-5644     --part1_14b.37d6b97.29169b6b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Shepard Road Christian = Church &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Macedonia, OHio <BR>One service, 1045 <BR>MIxed SAB Choir <BR>Mixed service musically, &nbsp;&nbsp;tradtional (Chalice Hymnal) and = some Praise Choruses <BR>Traditional Protestant Denomination service format <BR>Payment is 50$ weekly for one service and one rehearsal, may be = negotiable to 70$ <BR>There is much flexibility in this job, there are several built in subs = available and <BR>no contract or specific requirements as far as what the = Organist/Pianist plays for <BR>service music. <BR>This is a job for someone who needs/wants to play, but also = needs/wants a church that is flexible and accommodating with both = requirements and scheduling. <BR>email to above address (eppleyb@cs.com) &nbsp;or call church at = 330-467-5644 <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_14b.37d6b97.29169b6b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Temperament From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 06:06:33 -0800   I realize that the subject of temperament has been well aired, but some recent bulletins have touched on the question of when equal temperament became the norm.   >From correspondence in Organists Review came the following: ".. the question of the temperament used by Jurgen Ahrend in his restoration of the Schnitger St Jacobi organ.. it was there (in a past OR) that one read that, in certain temperaments,'one had to endure considerable harshness ' in some major keys." It went further that "on the advice of Andreas Werckmeister in 1688 that instrument had been tuned to equal temperament, and that his friend JS Bach himself had championed this system, in the face of reluctant organ builders".The reference is listed.   The writer goes further to admit that in the opinion of Noel Mander, it was possible that the "equal temperament" of Bach was possibly a little different from the modern temperament of that name. Notwithstanding this it seem that certain musicians of the 17th century, including JSB were not altogether happy with the traditional temperaments, because of the "harshness in certain major keys",and wished for something better, hence the experimenting with an "equal temperament".   >From the same source comes also a comment that equal temperament was adopted for tuning of the piano in 1846, long before most of the great early romantic organs of the UK and France were built; it is therefore quite plausible to conjecture that the organs of Vierne and company, and that the major organs in the UK were tuned to equal temperament sometime in the early to mid 19th Century, remembering that the change to equal temperament on the organ may have preceded its application to the piano.   OK, the quotes are out of context but if you have the Feb. 2001 Organists Review you can read the whole reference yourself. Maybe those who try to make a return to the ancient temperaments when adopting a tuning system for modern organs are making a mistake!!   One last word, disagree with me if you wish, but don't tell me I'm an idiot which seems to be the favoured response by some who can't tolerate having their ideas questioned!!!!   Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: consequences From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 10:13:55 -0400   The town of lunenburg used to have its own police force, not sure of what = is now ,Just think this one out The Fire department was on the other side of the street opposite the = chancel of St .John's THe catholic church is on the opposite corner. I agree Bruce, once caught they need a punnishment to let them see = consequences of playing with fire.It fortunate that no one was hurt in = this act.,but its sad for to lose such a beautiful building with so much = history. on a good note The Churches Hand bells were unharmed.as well as the tower bell sheet = music. the tower Bells were a very rare manually lever operated system.THey = were rung every day at 2pm every day untill Nov1 when they were silenced = .the last ringing they made was when they fell with the tower.It isnt = known what the fire, hot ,cold ,and fall have done to the bells.    
(back) Subject: Music for Advent From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 14:18:05 -0000   Dear List,   If any of you are looking for some new music for Advent this year, then please visit http://members.sibeliusmusic.com/sbarker/ where you'll find copies of my Missa Ventio Christi (Mass for the Coming of Christ) and my Advent Dismissal. Both of these are available free of charge, but I would appreciate knowing if you find them useful!   Apologies for the self-plug but as these are free for you to use I hope = you won't mind!   Thanks for the ideas for the organ (some more serious than others!) Keep them coming!   Steve Canterbury UK    
(back) Subject: Re: Temperament From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 08:57:51 -0600   It is worth noting that the famous organ in the Laurenskerk in Alkmaar, Holland, has been tuned to equal temperament ever since it was built, although at the time it was built this was highly unusual. In the United States, David Tannenberg of Lititz, Pennsylvania was tuning his organs to equal temperament as early as the 1760's, following the advice of German theoretician G. A. Sorge..   On the other hand there may be something to be said for a very slightly unequal temperament that adds color to the different keys and at the same time is sufficiently like equal temperament that many people wouldn't even notice the difference. Such, for example, was the Thomas Young = temperament used by Thomas Appleton and others for their organs in early nineteenth-century Boston.   John Speller   Bob Elms wrote:   > I realize that the subject of temperament has been well aired, but some > recent bulletins have touched on the question of when equal temperament > became the norm. > > >From correspondence in Organists Review came the following: > ".. the question of the temperament used by Jurgen Ahrend in his > restoration of the Schnitger St Jacobi organ.. it was there (in a past > OR) that one read that, in certain temperaments,'one had to endure > considerable harshness ' in some major keys." It went further that "on > the advice of Andreas Werckmeister in 1688 that instrument had been > tuned to equal temperament, and that his friend JS Bach himself had > championed this system, in the face of reluctant organ builders".The > reference is listed. > > The writer goes further to admit that in the opinion of Noel Mander, it > was possible that the "equal temperament" of Bach was possibly a little > different from the modern temperament of that name. Notwithstanding this > it seem that certain musicians of the 17th century, including JSB were > not altogether happy with the traditional temperaments, because of the > "harshness in certain major keys",and wished for something better, hence > the experimenting with an "equal temperament". > > >From the same source comes also a comment that equal temperament was > adopted for tuning of the piano in 1846, long before most of the great > early romantic organs of the UK and France were built; it is therefore > quite plausible to conjecture that the organs of Vierne and company, and > that the major organs in the UK were tuned to equal temperament sometime > in the early to mid 19th Century, remembering that the change to equal > temperament on the organ may have preceded its application to the piano. > > OK, the quotes are out of context but if you have the Feb. 2001 > Organists Review you can read the whole reference yourself. Maybe those > who try to make a return to the ancient temperaments when adopting a > tuning system for modern organs are making a mistake!! > > One last word, disagree with me if you wish, but don't tell me I'm an > idiot which seems to be the favoured response by some who can't tolerate > having their ideas questioned!!!! > > Bob Elms. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Sunday in Octave of All Saints' Day - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 07:10:22 -0800   Sung Holy Communion at 9:00 a.m.   Voluntary - Gaudeamus - Titcomb Processional - For All the Saints, verses 1-4 - Sine nomine Setting - Willan/Scottish Chant Offertory Anthem - What Are These That Are Arrayed In White Robes? - Stainer Communion Hymns The Saints of God, Their Conflict Past - Beati I Sing A Song of the Saints of God - Grand Isle Orison - My Country, 'Tis of Thee, verse 4 - America Recessional - For All the Saints, verses 5-8 - Sine nomine Voluntary - Improvisation on Sine nomine   High Mass at 11:00 a.m.   Same Voluntary, Setting, Hymns no anthems Proper - Gaudeamus - Tones VIII, VI, I       The soprano soloist got all choked up on Thursday night when she got to "and God shall wipe away all tears" in the anthem ... the parish is still reeling from the death of the infant daughter of the chairman of my organ committee. But she'll be fine this morning ... the same thing happened when we were rehearsing the music for the Burial Office for little Roxanne ... but at the service, she was a trooper.   Next Sunday will be ANOTHER tear-jerker ... we do Veterans' Day / Armistice Day / Remembrance Day in a BIG way. The choir is singing "In Solemn Silence" for one of the anthems ... I haven't quite decided yet what to do for the other one.   Off to church ...   Cheers,   Bud-by-the-Beach    
(back) Subject: Re: Effect of swell shutter opening on tonality From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 15:40:28 -0000   ----- Original Message ----- From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Sent: Saturday, November 03, 2001 5:16 PM   Dick, Thanks for your input.   >As the shutters close, the highs are dampened disproportionately. In = fact, even the open shutters have that effect, which is why some or all of the pipes are left exposed, depending upon the literature for which the instrument is designed. For Bach, the effect of shutters is awful: you lose clarity and precision. For the Romantic literature, the effect can = be wonderful: the sound of those reeds desperately trying to claw their way out of the closed box really sets you up for what's to come when the shutters open.   But Compton built several totally enclosed straight organs (Derby = Cathedral is one) with the pipes voiced for that environment. Shutters on top of the boxes firing into the roof as well as the front.The effect of the full = swell or big Tuba crescendo was quite wonderful. I'm sure Bach was fine with a small combination and the shutters open.     > Depending upon your hardware, you may run into a wall. The SBLive, for example, won't >let you change its low-pass filter settings over the = course of a sustained tone.   Yes, I am using SB Live, but according to my info you can change the = Filter Cut-off in real time but not the Filter Resonance Co-efficient. Anyway = with just the filter cut-off it it does work and gives a reasonably realistic result although I can't pretend the parameters are based on any exact measurements.   Regards,   Bruce Miles   mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Concert at Oberlin last Night From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 11:11:06 -0500   Hi again, As my Weekend at Oberlin College activities progresses, I attended a recital played by Daniel Roth (I was surprised to hear Roth is pronounced with a long "o" sound) on the new Fisk Organ in Finney Chapel. No old "war-horse" selections were heard this night. I had never heard any of the selections performed before, and indeed a full 25% of the concert was dedicated to improvisation, which had not been heard by anyone before.   1. Offertoire sur les grands jeux (from Mass for the Parishes) by Francois Couperin   2. Symphonic Interlude (from the Oratorio Redemption) by Cesar Franck (transcription by Daniel Roth)   3. Scherzo, Op. 8, No. 5 (from Six Duos for harmonium and piano) by Camille Saint Saens (transcription for organ by Daniel Roth)   4. Triptyque-Homage a Pierre Cochereau by Daniel Roth Prelude Andante Toccata   INTERMISSION   5. Improvisation-Daniel Roth   6. Sonata on the 94th Psalm by Julius Reubke Introduction-Grave Larghetto-Allegro con fuoco Adagio Allegro- Allegro assai   The concert attendance was rather sparse. (I counted about 200), so I was able to switch seating locations at Intermission. I spent the first half of the concert nearly front row center so I could watch Mr. Roth's work at the console, and the second half in the last row center of the rear balcony. The organ indeed sounds different from the two locations, but I cannot report any unpleasantness to my admittedly untrained ears. Mr. Roth used many voices I had not heard before last night, as would be expected from his choice of literature. This instrument seems quite capable of handling the nuances of the French literature, but seems equally at home with Bach as it does with Alain. IMHO, Oberlin has got themselves a real gem with this instrument. Mr. Roth seems a wizard at the console. I was knocked out by the Saint Saens considering I had only heard his symphonic work previously. I found that much of this music seemed to be in the style of Olivier Messiaen, with abounding discordance, and never ending time signature changes. the number of registration changes was phenomenal, but easily accomplished with a foot lever just to the right of the Swell pedals. The changes were obviously programmed into the computer so that Mr. Roth could tap this same lever for the next change, and the next, and so on. During his improvisation section, we also discovered Mr. Roth was most adept at making manual registration changes. Professor Thompson handed Mr. Roth the music he would improvise from, on stage, so Mr. Roth did not know what to expect before hand. This was a very interesting exercise that I had not ever seen before. His improvisation was nearly like a demonstration of the entire organ as he thundered through the full organ sections, and brought it all the way down to sections where only the various highest pitches of the organ were played. It was a real treat indeed. We managed to bring Mr. Roth back out for an encore despite the somewhat feeble applause able to be generated with only 400 hands. He spoke for the first time before his encore, though without a microphone, and me sitting as far from the stage as I could get, I heard not what he said. The encore was a gentle and sweet, high pitched piece, that reminded me of what one might hear from a music box. It was a fitting close to an evening of thunder and lightening, and I enjoyed it all very much. Like I said in a post yesterday, there is some that recharges your soul when you spend some time in front of a live pipe organ, whether you are playing it, or just listening to it. With all the discussion lately about what brings people to the pipe organ and pipe organ music, I think somehow that may be the key. I am in constant wonderment of the complexity of the instrument, and the talent of those who build it. I am blown away by the ability of anyone who can play it. I am stirred to the marrow by the music, and I am fascinated by the history, and the diversity brought to the instrument by the different international cultures that embrace the pipe organ. If I could package all of that, and set it on the doorstep of every home in the world, perhaps we could somehow find a common ground, and learn to live together in a world of music instead of terrorism. One last note, and that is an apology for my omission of diacritical markings. I know I should take the time to learn how to create them on my word processor, but alas, I haven't done so yet.   Warmest Regards to All Mike      
(back) Subject: Re: Donkey Carol From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 14:10:38 -0500   If all-else fails, try the " Donkey Serenade" from the "Grand Canyon = Suite"   Rick    
(back) Subject: Sunday following ASD - out of the primordial ooze . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 14:14:36 -0600   November 4, 2001 The Sunday following All Saints' and All Souls' Days St. Agatha's Episcopal Church   Prelude: The joy of the redeemed (O quanta qualia) - Clarence Dickinson Processional Hymn: For all the saints (Sine Nomine) - H 287 Sequence Hymn: Ye watchers and ye holy ones (Lasst uns erfreuen) - H 618 Offertory Hymn: Who are these like stars appearing (Zeuch mich, zeuch mich) - H 286 Music during Communion: Pavane for a dead princess - Maurice Ravel (piano) Closing Hymn: Ye holy angels bright (Darwall's 148th) - H 625 Postlude: Toccata and Fugue in D minor - J. S. Bach   "All music today praises God in remembrance of All Saints' and All Souls' Days occurring this past week. The postlude is a tradition at St. = Agatha's for the Sunday following All Saints' Day, at which time we rescue Bach = from Halloween."   The Canon to the Ordinary was visiting today and preached the sermon. He told a story of when he first graduated from seminary and was working in = New Orleans. On a Sunday following All Saints' Day he was teaching a group of small children, and asked if they knew what saints were. A small boy in = the back raised his hand enthusiastically, and responded that "they are = football players".   From there Father Dunnam launched his sermon that we are all "football players for Jesus". Afterward he remarked to me that he knew nothing = about football, and hoped his sermon was not too silly. I replied, "You are at St. Agatha's - of course, it wasn't too silly."   The busybody from yesterday appointed herself an usher again today (don't know how that happened), and just stood there again with the collection plates during the offertory hymn. During the second verse, I turn to her and her husband and say, "Go! Go! Go!" I guess that makes me a = cheerleader.   And I say unto you, "Rah, rah, yada, yada."   Glenda Sutton (who keeps hearing tinkling bells during the Agnus Dei and other weird times - where is Richard Hooker when you need him?)        
(back) Subject: Re: Concert at Oberlin Last Night From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 18:30:46 -0500   Well, is my face red, I reported that Mr. Daniel Roth"s improvisational style is "Messiaen like", and I could not have jumped to a more wrong conclusion. I indeed should have said "Mr. Roth performed an improvisation last night at Oberlin, and it seemed "Messiaen like". This afternoon, I attended a lecture and demonstration given by Mr. Roth at Oberlin, on the whole subject of improvisation. he explained the main different schools of improvisational styles, Polyphonic, and Gregorian, and proceeded to tell us about the elements used to create well constructed improvisations. This is obviously a vast area of study, and I realized that I had done Mr. Roth a great disservice by labeling his improvisational style in such an offhand manner. He obviously has far more to offer in both styles and content, than what I heard last night. I also got to hear the organ today under a set of circumstances I had not heard before. All my live organ listening so far has been at concerts. I had never heard it being used as an instructional instrument before. Although I am not trying to find something to dislike about the Fisk, I must say I found several of the individual voices to be a tad disagreeable. They were obviously reeds, and it was not the steady tone of them I found a bit funny, but the start and stopping of them. I have come to know the term "Chiff", but thought that it applied more to flues, and have never heard it before when a note was released. Being that this instrument has mechanical key action, could this be a result of the player's articulation, or am I hearing something peculiar to Fisk? Well, I have run off quite a bit this weekend, but only because I had a terrific time meeting the new Fisk, and hearing some music I never had before. I still love Bach, but it's nice to form an appreciation for other styles of music as well. If you had asked me what I would have you play for me last week, I would have requested the Gm Fantasia and Fugue. It had been my long time favorite. If you ask me now, I would want "Litanies" by Jehan Alain, and then the Gm Bach. Who knows what I may ask for tomorrow. it's nice to know one's musical tastes need not be set in stone. :-).   Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: Concert at Oberlin Last Night From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 19:56:27 EST     --part1_80.128f8f23.29173dbb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/4/01 6:29:44 PM Eastern Standard Time, mike3247@earthlink.net writes:     > I found several of the individual voices to be a tad > disagreeable. They were obviously reeds, and it was not the steady tone > of them I found a bit funny, but the start and stopping of them. I have > come to know the term "Chiff", but thought that it applied more to > flues, and have never heard it before when a note was released. Being > that this instrument has mechanical key action, could this be a result > of the player's articulation, or am I hearing something peculiar to > Fisk?   I think what you're referring to is "burp". I've found it to be more common in instruments with low pressure, both EP and tracker.... DE too. =   It's a voicing problem, I believe.     > Well, I have run off quite a bit this weekend, but only because I > had a terrific time meeting the new Fisk, and hearing some music I never > had before. I still love Bach, but it's nice to form an appreciation for > other styles of music as well. If you had asked me what I would have you > play for me last week, I would have requested the Gm Fantasia and Fugue. > It had been my long time favorite. If you ask me now, I would want > "Litanies" by Jehan Alain, and then the Gm Bach. Who knows what I may > ask for tomorrow. it's nice to know one's musical tastes need not be set > in stone. :-). > It is neat to learn that you can like more than one composer and more than =   one piece! (of course you must keep it to yourself!) ;-)   Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi     --part1_80.128f8f23.29173dbb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/4/01 6:29:44 PM Eastern Standard Time, mike3247@earthlink.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I found several of = the individual voices to be a tad <BR>disagreeable. They were obviously reeds, and it was not the steady = tone <BR>of them I found a bit funny, but the start and stopping of them. I = have <BR>come to know the term "Chiff", but thought that it applied more to <BR>flues, and have never heard it before when a note was released. Being <BR>that this instrument has mechanical key action, could this be a result <BR>of the player's articulation, or am I hearing something peculiar to <BR>Fisk?</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I think what you're referring to is "burp". = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I've found it to be more common in instruments with low = pressure, both EP and tracker.... DE too. &nbsp;&nbsp;It's a voicing = problem, I believe. <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px"> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Well, I have run off quite a bit this weekend, but = only because I <BR>had a terrific time meeting the new Fisk, and hearing some music I = never <BR>had before. I still love Bach, but it's nice to form an appreciation = for <BR>other styles of music as well. If you had asked me what I would have = you <BR>play for me last week, I would have requested the Gm Fantasia and = Fugue. <BR>It had been my long time favorite. If you ask me now, I would want <BR>"Litanies" by Jehan Alain, and then the Gm Bach. Who knows what I may <BR>ask for tomorrow. it's nice to know one's musical tastes need not be set <BR>in stone. :-). <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">It is neat to learn that you can like more than = one composer and more than one piece! &nbsp;&nbsp;(of course you must keep = it to yourself!) ;-) <BR> <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_80.128f8f23.29173dbb_boundary--