PipeChat Digest #2490 - Wednesday, November 7, 2001
 
the small organ and the Anglican repertoire
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: temperaments: NEXT! (grin)
  by "Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net>
RE: Temperaments
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2487 - 11/06/01 - Temperament
  by <PHarri5833@aol.com>
Re: Temperaments
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Donations to St. John's Church Pipe Organ Fund  can be sent to the  maili
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Orchestration for Dummies
  by <ChPardini@aol.com>
Bach recordings with Anthony Newman
  by <WiegandCJ@aol.com>
RE: Bach recordings with Anthony Newman
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
 

(back) Subject: the small organ and the Anglican repertoire From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 07 Nov 2001 09:27:41 -0800     --------------7EDB73C386BDC243808FB5F9 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   One reason the Anglican repertoire fails so miserably on most small organs is that NOBODY wanted to design a small ROMANTIC organ until Schoenstein started building their stock-model choir organs.   Let's compare what a turn-of-the-20th-century builder thought was essential with what Flentrop (for instance) thought was essential in a small organ:   (1) Estey, 1907 ... could just as well be Hook, etc.   SWELL (enclosed)   8' Stopped Diapason 8' Salicional 4' Harmonic Flute Tremulant   GREAT   8' OPEN DIAPASON (in facade) 8' Dulciana 4' Octave Swell/Great 8-4   PEDAL   16' Bourdon Swell/Pedal Great/Pedal   (1) Flentrop, c. 1964   OBERWERK   8' Oak Gedackt 4' Spillfloete 2' Gemshoorn   HAUTPWERK   8' Rohrfloete 4' Prestant (in facade) ? Mixture II OW/HW   PEDAL   16' Dulzian (1/2 length reed) - in facade 8' Bourdon - metal OW/Ped HW/Ped   I've prolly got the spellings wrong ... can't remember how most things were named or spelled in Dutch (grin).   Both organs were voiced fairly aggressively ... the Estey had been moved from a larger church to a smaller church.   (1) had the all important 8' Open Diapason. The 4' Octave was enough smaller and softer than it could be played down an octave for a mezzo 8' stop on the Great   (2)'s coupled PLENUM worked for Bach Preludes and Fugues, and the three dissimilar 8' flutes for trio sonatas, but not much else.   (1)'s four 8' stops coupled together approximated the "four fonds" for French music. (2)'s two 8' flutes did not.   (1)'s 4' Harmonic Flute down an octave, accompanied by the Dulciana, gave a RAVISHING solo stop, with or without tremulant (grin).   About the only solo combination that WORKED on (2) was OW 8 Gedeckt and 2' Gemshoorn, accompanied by the 8' flute of the HW and the Pedal, but it was PRETTY *bright*.   (1) could play a romantic Anglican service; (2) couldn't.   Shorn of all the "prepared-fors", here's what Stage One of our new organ looks like:   SWELL (enclosed)   16' Gedeckt - 12 pipes - ext. 8' Gedeckt 8' Open Diapason 8' Hohl Flute 8' Gedeckt 8' Viola 8' Celeste (neutral tone, to go with Gedeckt OR Viola) 4' Octave 16' Bassoon - 12 pipes - ext. Oboe - new 8' Trumpet 8' Oboe - new   Sw 16-U-4 Tremulant (swell division only)   GREAT (encased)   8' Open Diapason - new 8' Chimney Flute - new 8' Ludwigtone - recycled 4' Octave - new 2 2/3 Cornet III (full compass) - recycled Sw. flutes + 1 new rank (tierce) 2' Full Mixture V ranks - new   Gt 16-U-4 (Gt. 4' doesn't affect the cornet & mixture) Sw/Gt 16-8-4 Tremulant (great division only) Chimes   PEDAL   32' Resultant - bottom twelve Subbass 16 + Gedeckt 10 2/3; balance Subbass 16' playing an octave lower 16' Subbass - recycled 16' Gedeckt (swell) 8' Octave - recycled 8' Flute - 12 pipes - ext. Subbass 4' Choral Bass - new 4' Flute - 12 pipes - ext. Subbass 16' Bassoon (swell)   All straight, except as indicated. Electric slider chests, except for the unit stops. Compass 61/32. AGO console. Swell expression and Register Crescendo.   The Swell, except for the Oboe, is the 1966 Moller revoiced, rescaled, etc.; the Great is mostly new; the Pedal 4' Choral Bass is new.   I know I'm going to regret not having the 16-8 Violone-Violoncello unit in the Great and Pedal ... perhaps money will be found for it.   Gee, looks REMARKABLY like a Skinner (chuckle), except for the Ludwigtone ... BIG Swell, little Great, "augmented" Pedal, LOTS of couplers.   Bet the Viole + Celeste + Ludwigtone + 16-8-4 couplers + Pedal Resultant is gonna make GOOD "prayin' music" (grin).   I think I'll be able to play church on THAT (grin).   Cheers,   Bud         Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 11/7/01 10:53:10 AM Eastern Standard Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > > >> I'm always puzzled/amused when I see an organ with an historical >> tuning >> go into an Anglican church ... I wonder what they DO with it (grin). >> And >> I think it's even ODDER that a LOT of Anglican organists who >> champion >> the above repertoire ALSO champion historical tunings. Curious ... > > A gently un-equal historic tuning, such as Valotti, works perfectly > with Stanford and the rest of the gang. If the big romantic pieces > don't work well on a small organ, they why not have the small organ > with a tuning system that makes it unique? It's a disservice to > Anglican worship to lock it into the "celeste and subcoupler" genre. > I love worship in places like Church of the Advent - Boston. But I > don't expect that kind of worship in a small parish, and would much > rather hear an exceptional and unique pipe organ than an organ that's > futilly trying to be Skinner-esque but failing miserably. There is > more than one way to skin a pontificat! > > Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > and wander through the Mall Without Walls > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi   --------------7EDB73C386BDC243808FB5F9 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> One reason the Anglican repertoire fails so miserably on most small organs is that NOBODY wanted to design a small ROMANTIC organ until Schoenstein started building their stock-model choir organs. <p>Let's compare what a turn-of-the-20th-century builder thought was = essential with what Flentrop (for instance) thought was essential in a small organ: <p>(1) Estey, 1907 ... could just as well be Hook, etc. <p>SWELL (enclosed) <p>8' Stopped Diapason <br>8' Salicional <br>4' Harmonic Flute <br>Tremulant <p>GREAT <p>8' OPEN DIAPASON (in facade) <br>8' Dulciana <br>4' Octave <br>Swell/Great 8-4 <p>PEDAL <p>16' Bourdon <br>Swell/Pedal <br>Great/Pedal <p>(1) Flentrop, c. 1964 <p>OBERWERK <p>8' Oak Gedackt <br>4' Spillfloete <br>2' Gemshoorn <p>HAUTPWERK <p>8' Rohrfloete <br>4' Prestant (in facade) <br>? Mixture II <br>OW/HW <p>PEDAL <p>16' Dulzian (1/2 length reed) - in facade <br>8' Bourdon - metal <br>OW/Ped <br>HW/Ped <p>I've prolly got the spellings wrong ... can't remember how most things were named or spelled in Dutch (grin). <p>Both organs were voiced fairly aggressively ... the Estey had been = moved from a larger church to a smaller church. <p>(1) had the all important 8' Open Diapason. The 4' Octave was enough smaller and softer than it could be played down an octave for a mezzo 8' stop on the Great <p>(2)'s coupled PLENUM worked for Bach Preludes and Fugues, and the three dissimilar 8' flutes for trio sonatas, but not much else. <p>(1)'s four 8' stops coupled together approximated the "four fonds" for French music. (2)'s two 8' flutes did not. <p>(1)'s 4' Harmonic Flute down an octave, accompanied by the Dulciana, gave a RAVISHING solo stop, with or without tremulant (grin). <p>About the only solo combination that WORKED on (2) was OW 8 Gedeckt and 2' Gemshoorn, accompanied by the 8' flute of the HW and the Pedal, but it was PRETTY *bright*. <p>(1) could play a romantic Anglican service; (2) couldn't. <p>Shorn of all the "prepared-fors", here's what Stage One of our new = organ looks like: <p>SWELL (enclosed) <p>16' Gedeckt - 12 pipes - ext. 8' Gedeckt <br>8' Open Diapason <br>8' Hohl Flute <br>8' Gedeckt <br>8' Viola <br>8' Celeste (neutral tone, to go with Gedeckt OR Viola) <br>4' Octave <br>16' Bassoon - 12 pipes - ext. Oboe - new <br>8' Trumpet <br>8' Oboe - new <p>Sw 16-U-4 <br>Tremulant (swell division only) <p>GREAT (encased) <p>8' Open Diapason - new <br>8' Chimney Flute - new <br>8' Ludwigtone - recycled <br>4' Octave - new <br>2 2/3 Cornet III (full compass) - recycled Sw. flutes + 1 new rank (tierce) <br>2' Full Mixture V ranks - new <p>Gt 16-U-4 (Gt. 4' doesn't affect the cornet &amp; mixture) <br>Sw/Gt 16-8-4 <br>Tremulant (great division only) <br>Chimes <p>PEDAL <p>32' Resultant - bottom twelve Subbass 16 + Gedeckt 10 2/3; balance = Subbass 16' playing an octave lower <br>16' Subbass - recycled <br>16' Gedeckt (swell) <br>8' Octave - recycled <br>8' Flute - 12 pipes - ext. Subbass <br>4' Choral Bass - new <br>4' Flute - 12 pipes - ext. Subbass <br>16' Bassoon (swell) <p>All straight, except as indicated. Electric slider chests, except for the unit stops. Compass 61/32. AGO console. Swell expression and Register Crescendo. <p>The Swell, except for the Oboe, is the 1966 Moller revoiced, rescaled, etc.; the Great is mostly new; the Pedal 4' Choral Bass is new. <p>I know I'm going to regret not having the 16-8 Violone-Violoncello unit in the Great and Pedal ... perhaps money will be found for it. <p>Gee, looks REMARKABLY like a Skinner (chuckle), except for the = Ludwigtone .... BIG Swell, little Great, "augmented" Pedal, LOTS of couplers. <p>Bet the Viole + Celeste + Ludwigtone + 16-8-4 couplers + Pedal = Resultant is gonna make GOOD "prayin' music" (grin). <p>I think I'll be able to play church on THAT (grin). <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <p>Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 11/7/01 10:53:10 AM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>I'm always puzzled/amused when I see an organ with an historical = tuning</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>go into an Anglican = church .... I wonder what they DO with it (grin). And</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>I think it's even ODDER that a LOT of Anglican organists who champion</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>the above repertoire = ALSO champion historical tunings. Curious ...</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>A gently = un-equal historic tuning, such as Valotti, works perfectly with Stanford and the rest of the gang.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If the big romantic pieces don't work well on a small organ, they why not have the small organ with a tuning system that makes it unique?&nbsp; It's a disservice to Anglican worship to lock it into the "celeste and subcoupler" genre.&nbsp;&nbsp; I love worship in places like Church of the Advent - Boston.&nbsp;&nbsp; But I don't expect that kind of worship in a small parish, and would much rather hear an exceptional and unique pipe organ than an organ that's futilly trying to be Skinner-esque but failing miserably.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There is more than one way to skin a pontificat!</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Please = visit Howling Acres at&nbsp;&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/">http://members.tripod.com/Bru= con502/</A></font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>&nbsp; = and wander through the Mall Without Walls</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Bruce = Cornely&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ~&nbsp; Cremona502@cs.com</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>with the = Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!"</font></font></font> <br><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi</font></font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------7EDB73C386BDC243808FB5F9--    
(back) Subject: Re: temperaments: NEXT! (grin) From: "Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 12:35:50 -0600   Bud wrote:   >Equal temperament isn't ideal; it works reasonably well; there are >trade-offs.   Wasn't it Winston Churchill who said something along the lines of: "Democracy is the worst form of government--except for all the others."?   John  
(back) Subject: RE: Temperaments From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 13:37:24 -0500   Roy Redman writes:   >Good Grief!! Brass and woodwind instruments are tuned with the finest strobe >tuners we have available.   Tuned but not tempered. The players do that.   > Piano tuners and organ tuners are judged with the same tuners.   By whom?   >It is precisely because some tuners have worked with inferior >aural tuners, or entirely by ear with faulty ideas, that equal = temperament has >many times failed to satisfy. I have heard "ear" temperaments called "equal" >that were unbelievably bad! Lets be sure we get it right before we call = it >Equal Temperament.   Do you mean that the pianos in, e.g. Carnegie Hall, are now tuned by = someone staring into a machine? I really doubt it.   I heard a radio interview with a piano technician expert enough to be = hired by the managers of such places. He disdained the idea that an electronic aid was of any use to a tuner working for a customer with such high expectations. That was, I admit, probably fifteen or twenty years ago, = but what has changed since? The arrival of the pentium? It is rumored that this name was given to it because the folks at Intel asked this new chip = to add 100 to 80486 and it came up with 80585.9999627.   My point is that mathematical perfection was just as achievable twenty = years ago as it is now, and it is just as disappointing to the ear.   Of course an incompetent tuner (like myself, God knows, whenever I try to "lay a temperament") will probably botch his attempt at equal temperament without a machine (and probably even with one). And incompetence gives a bad name to whatever it touches. But perhaps this only underlines my feeling that it isn't just science, there is still art in it.   Paul    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2487 - 11/06/01 - Temperament From: <PHarri5833@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 14:17:52 EST     --part1_157.3a20357.291ae2e0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 07/11/01 15:39:39 GMT Standard Time, RonSeverin writes:   > Chose a temperament, and it will play a short example, and so on. > Bach was familiar with Silbermann and several other well tempers. > You will also see why some of these didn't survive, while others did.   Thanks, Ron,   Some day I'll probably manage to port the applets across to the one on = which I do my audio work. For good reasons, my hi-spec computer which I use for audio editing, CD mastering etc. is networked to my other machines, but I don't have audio facilities in this computer which I use for email and web =   browsing.   Whilst I can see form the opening page that it covers a lot of tunings, it =   does not appear to make any reference to what you describe as the "well" temperament.   I had begun to wonder if this "well" temperament really existed and if so what it amounted to either in frequency multiples or in terms of beats per =   minute for each interval particular. I think I have now answered this by reference the web site of Herbert Anton Kellner in which he seems to = suggest Bach's "Well tempered" system is actually another name for Werckmeister's scheme.   Quoting from Kellners website (http://ha.kellner.bei.t-online.de/)...   > This welltempered system is specified via the fundamental C-major triad, = the > sharpened third c-e of which beats at the same rate as the flattened > welltempered fifth c-g in optimum mutual adaptation. The second octave = of > the third is made up by four such welltempered fifths c-g-d-a-e. The = fifth > e-b is perfect. From c descend six perfect fifths until g-flat (f-sharp) = is > reached, including octave transpositions where necessary, upon tuning a > harpsichord. The chromatic scale wohltemperirt, ascending successively = from > c, reads in cent: > >> 0,0; 90,2; 194,6; 294,1; 389,1; 498,0; 588,3; 697,3; 792,2; 891,8; = 996,1; >> 1091,1; 1200,0. > The inventor of this system was Andreas Werckmeister, as my publications =   > show. It was reconstituted on 21.12.1975 - see the <A = HREF=3D"http://ha.kellner.bei.t-online.de/#German patent DE 25 58 = 716">patent</A>.   I'll try and decode this into terms I can comprehend and then I think my question is answered!   Peter   Peter M Harrison Emmanuel Church, Holcombe Ramsbottom, Lancashire & P H Music tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 web www.phmusic.co.uk   --part1_157.3a20357.291ae2e0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 07/11/01 15:39:39 GMT Standard Time, = RonSeverin writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Chose a = temperament, and it will play a short example, and so on.<BR> Bach was familiar with Silbermann and several other well tempers.<BR> You will also see why some of these didn't survive, while others = did.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Thanks, Ron,<BR> <BR> Some day I'll probably manage to port the applets across to the one on = which I do my audio work. For good reasons, my hi-spec computer which I = use for audio editing, CD mastering etc. is networked to my other = machines, but I don't have audio facilities in this computer which I use = for email and web browsing.<BR> <BR> Whilst I can see form the opening page that it covers a lot of tunings, it = does not appear to make any reference to what you describe as the "well" = temperament.<BR> <BR> I had begun to wonder if this "well" temperament really existed and if so = what it amounted to either in frequency multiples or in terms of beats per = minute for each interval particular. I think I have now answered this by = reference the web site of Herbert Anton Kellner in which he seems to = suggest Bach's "Well tempered" system is actually another name for = Werckmeister's scheme.<BR> <BR> Quoting from Kellners website (http://ha.kellner.bei.t-online.de/)...<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">This welltempered = system is specified via the fundamental C-major triad, the sharpened third = <I>c-e</I> of which beats at the same rate as the flattened welltempered = fifth <I>c-g</I> in optimum mutual adaptation. The second octave of the = third is made up by four such welltempered fifths <I>c-g-d-a-e</I>. The = fifth <I>e</I>-<I>b</I> is perfect. From <I>c</I> descend six perfect = fifths until <I>g-flat</I> (<I>f-sharp</I>) is reached, including octave = transpositions where necessary, upon tuning a harpsichord. The chromatic = scale <I>wohltemperirt</I>, ascending successively from <I>c</I>, reads in = cent: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">0,0; 90,2; 194,6; = 294,1; 389,1; 498,0; 588,3; 697,3; 792,2; 891,8; 996,1; 1091,1; = 1200,0.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> The inventor of this system was Andreas Werckmeister, as my publications = show. It was reconstituted on 21.12.1975 - see the <A = HREF=3D"http://ha.kellner.bei.t-online.de/#German patent DE 25 58 = 716">patent</A>.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> I'll try and decode this into terms I can comprehend and then I think my = question is answered!<BR> <BR> Peter<BR> <BR> Peter M Harrison<BR> Emmanuel Church, Holcombe<BR> Ramsbottom, Lancashire<BR> &amp; P H Music<BR> tel: +44 (0)1204 853310<BR> fax: +44 (0)1204 853445<BR> web www.phmusic.co.uk</FONT></HTML>   --part1_157.3a20357.291ae2e0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Temperaments From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 14:49:46 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, November 07, 2001 1:37 PM Subject: RE: Temperaments > > Do you mean that the pianos in, e.g. Carnegie Hall, are now tuned by someone > staring into a machine? I really doubt it. > > I heard a radio interview with a piano technician expert enough to be hired > by the managers of such places. He disdained the idea that an = electronic > aid was of any use to a tuner working for a customer with such high > expectations.   Well, I have a chance to make the boss look good, and it's on topic! At = the Boston AGO National Convention some years back, the exhibits were in the great armory castle across from the Park Plaza. At one end of the big hall was a separate, very large and very high room into which all noise-making pipe organs were put. We had a small continuo organ made by the company = for The Peabody in Baltimore and generously loaned to us by them, there was a = Moller Tracker(!), a (English)Walker practice organ, a continuo organ by Scot Huntington, and a rather larger instrument by Fernand Letourneau. Someone got the bright idea that there ought to be a performance of the Bach Concerto for Four Harpsichords, using the four small instruments as harpsichords, and the larger Letourneau as the orchestra. We were, I = think, in Valotti. I am not sure of the others, but it was decided that we would all tune to equal temperament, I believe. There was an unidentified guy running around with perhaps a new toy, a tuning device that could listen = to pitches and precisely identify them, and also indicate the correctness of tuning for various temperaments. Before the decision had been taken to do the Bach, John Mander had just checked and adjusted the Valotti tuning of our instrument before the next demonstration of it. (We had all agreed on times when each instrument would be demonstrated each day.) The man with = the tuning device, hereafter known as mwtd, checked John's Valotti and was = quite taken with the fact that it was perfect except for one note somewhere that was a cent off. That tuning was done quickly without any electronic = devices in sight. I am not telling this as something terribly unusual, either. It = is merely meant to bolster Paul's comment: "Do you mean that the pianos in, e.g. Carnegie Hall, are now tuned by someone staring into a machine? I really doubt it." And of course, he is correct. Most fine tuners set a temperament quickly and precisely by ear, almost by instinct. I tuned my = way through college, and even my simple mind was eventually able to produce a temperament in reasonable time. They did not always proof out the first time, but most of the time they did.   Temperamentally,   Malcolm Wechsler          
(back) Subject: Donations to St. John's Church Pipe Organ Fund can be sent to the mailing address below From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 07 Nov 2001 16:59:04 -0400   To all interested in sending Donations to St. Johns Church in Lunenburg = for Pipe Organ or building fund Clearly mark envelope and how ever you send money . please send donation for Pipe Organ to:     "PIPE ORGAN FUND" St. John's Church C/o PO Box 238 Lunenburg, Nova Scotia B0J 2C0                  
(back) Subject: Re: Orchestration for Dummies From: <ChPardini@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 16:02:09 EST       I would suggest Walter Piston's book simply titled Orchestration. It's published by Norton. Also, Kent Kennan's book The Techniques of Orchestration. This one is published by Norton also, I believe. Both are =   very readable and informative. Samuel Adler's book on orchestration is = good too (I forget the name and publisher). I believe it also has recordings available of the printed examples. Experience is the best teacher, = however these books will get you started.   Good luck!   CP  
(back) Subject: Bach recordings with Anthony Newman From: <WiegandCJ@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 16:34:56 EST   I have three cassettes with Bach recordings by Anthony Newman. It seems = they are from 1977. The recordings are made with an unknown organ. It is a neo baroque organ of medium size in a very dry accoustic. Can anyone help me = to identify this organ?   Carl  
(back) Subject: RE: Bach recordings with Anthony Newman From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 15:42:21 -0600   Might they be from the chapel at the Wooster School in Danbury, = Connecticut? I have an LP Tony made there of several Bach works at about that time.   -----Original Message----- From: WiegandCJ@aol.com [mailto:WiegandCJ@aol.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 07, 2001 3:35 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Bach recordings with Anthony Newman     I have three cassettes with Bach recordings by Anthony Newman. It seems = they   are from 1977. The recordings are made with an unknown organ. It is a neo baroque organ of medium size in a very dry accoustic. Can anyone help me = to identify this organ?   Carl   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org