PipeChat Digest #2491 - Wednesday, November 7, 2001
 
tuning
  by "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Temperaments
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2487 - 11/06/01
  by "Ken Earl" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2487 - 11/06/01
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Temperaments
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Temperaments
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Ken Earl vs Bruce Cornelly
  by "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
New Fisk -- First Presbyterian - Gainesville FL
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: tuning From: "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 8 Nov 2001 11:14:21 +1300   Dear all, A few years ago, our local organbuilder came to the Organists' Assoc. here in Wellington, New Zealand. He was a man trained first by WurliTzer, then = by Hill Norman & Beard, later working for Mander before coming to NZ via Cooper, Gill & Tompkins of South Africa (I'm establishing his = credentials). We met in a church with a 12-stop tracker of very clear tone from about 1912. George first tuned the Great to a machine, equal temperament, = showing that he had done it perfectly. He then re-tuned the Great himself, to the same temperament, by ear only, and the effect was remarkably different = even though the machine said it was exactly the same. George explained that, as we all know, one pipe will "draw" another. The machine therefore doesn't know when the pipe is in tune: George explained that you need to learn = well each rank of each organ so you can know how far into the "perfect" (according to the machine) no-beat zone you need to actually get it right: some diapasons will draw more than others, flutes certainly more than strings, and so on. And all along, the most sensitive machine will say you are in fact doing nothing at all! And clearly, the pipes below MidC are going to "draw" a helluva lot more than the higher pitches. So, George always set the scale on the middle octave of the 4ft Principal, and then tuned that entire rank, of course. Then he'd tune that middle octave to = the same octave of another rank, and then shut off the Principal and tune that other rank from the middle octave only, obviously in octaves working up = and down. And George is the finest tuner I know. Stunning, in fact. On another occasion he tuned the same organ's Great to Werckmeister and then to a Kirnberger temperament, finally tuning it back to equal before the meeting ended. Fascinating, and very decent of the church to allow us to have this done. So, George's comment always has been, NEVER NEVER NEVER tune by any kind of machine, however sensitive, unless you are so incompetent you = don't mind admitting you are not much of a tuner. That's most of us.   Someone else, Bud I think, referred to the compass of singers. The trouble is, some of us don't fit those ranges. Me, I'm a basso profundissimo, finding my most comfortable range from TenA down to 8ft CC, but find it relatively easy to get down to AAA, i.e. below the stave. In the 100-voice choir I've just joined the basses have to sing regularly at E or even F above Middle C, and there is just one note down to EE, just where my voice really relaxes. So you can imagine the fun I have trying to join in the local church's chorusy things on Sunday mornings in which there is no impossibility of a bass part. I feel cheated and left out, even though I'm = a musician (and a just-retired Anglican vicar!) I feel most bass parts are = in fact designed for baritones - even "Messiah" goes down only to FF. In a stunningly-good church here in Wellington many years ago there was a 6'5" Dutchman who sang basso profundississimo, having to falsetto above Ten.C. His bottom note was AAAA, the bottom note of the piano, just below 16ft CCC. I kid you not, and it was musical. You could only hear harmonics close to, really, but the choir of 40 mixed voices sang in the rear = gallery of a reverberant Gothic church seating 600. In Victoria, Palestrina etc. which they sang almost every week, some of the basses would double the = bass part an octave lower, i.e. down to about AAA below the stave for a slowmoving section, and then Rene van de Molen, the real basso, would sing along with them at two octaves below written pitch. Down in the church the effect was just unbelievable magic, something like adding a soft Pedal = 32ft open to 8 & 4ft manual flutes. The Director of Music, Maxwell Fernie, who was organist at Westminster Cathedral when George Malcolm was choirmaster, said he had never in his life heard as deep a bass, even in Russia, and assured all that they were genuine sung notes, not croaks. Rene's speaking voice was EE, just below the stave. Oh my, I still get a tingle, 30 years later, just thinking about that choir and what it could do.   Kind regards, Ross      
(back) Subject: RE: Temperaments From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 17:01:45 -0500   Roy Redman writes:   >Good Grief!! Brass and woodwind instruments are tuned with the finest strobe >tuners we have available.   Tuned but not tempered. The players do that.   > Piano tuners and organ tuners are judged with the same tuners.   By whom?   -------------------------------   I just wanted to add to my earlier message that the article "Tuning" in = _New Grove Dictionary_ mentions the stretching of octaves in piano tuning as a matter of taste. "A mild degree of inharmonicity obliges the tuner to = make all the octaves slightly larger than the theoretical norm of 1200 cents (which would be an octave with a frequency ratio of exactly 2:1)." The amount of stretch recommended in a publication of the Tuners Supply Co. varies with the range in the compass (greater for extreme bass and treble than in the midrange) and with the type of instrument (great for a small upright, less for a large upright, less again for a grand). Apparently, = it might well also vary with the type of music to be performed: Mr. Mark Lindley, the author of the article, writes "Some of the 'stretch' in the extreme bass and treble, however, is for the sake of a certain melodic = bite gained by making the octaves larger than harmonic justness would dictate. In this respect DIFFERENT TUNERS AND MUSICIANS HAVE DIFFERENT TASTES [my emphasis] but markedly stretched octaves are at best a mixed blessing in chamber music..."   Needless to say, this stretching of octaves constitutes a modification of mathematically exact equal temperament that is slight but complex, and significant enough to invalidate dependence on a machine designed to = enforce a simplistic numeric formula. I suspect that it is not even the only such modification.   Paul          
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2487 - 11/06/01 From: "Ken Earl" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 23:02:47 -0000   Bruce Cornelly wrote>>   >>However, the bass response may be different. We shall see!   A few questions / critiques of the spec you sent to the list follow.....     Great Organ ..Manual I Prestant 16' (these are usually of 4' pitch in French instruments, and are the 'octave' to the Montre) Octave 8' - My my, an Octave to a double sub octave = prestant. A Montre perhaps??? Spillpfeife 8' Flute harmonique 8' Violoncelle 8' Octave 4' Rohrflote 4' Twelfth 2 2/3' - cannot be a twelfth if the first Octave is at = 8'. Fifteenth 2' ditto as for 12th Terz 1 3/5' - ditto as for 12th, unless it's flute toned. Mixture V-VII Trommeten 8' Trompette 8'   Alternatively, do we actually have a 'standard' great here, with some = fancy names, which is actually based upon an 8' principal??   Positiv Organ ... Manual II Prestant 8' - ah, a sub octave Prestant??? Gedackt 8' Octave 4' Now, this one should be called Prestant. Baarpijp 4' - is this a reed?? If not, another fancy name pretending to be something it's not. Nasard 2 2/3' Doublet 2' - does this have two ranks, as in 15th and 22nd, = if not, it's a Fifteenth, or a Piccolo of some description. Another fancy = name I suspect!! Quarte de Nasard 2' - once again, does this have 2 ranks, the 12th and the 15th?? If not, is this not a misnomer?? Tierce 1 3/5' Scharff IV Dulcian 16' Cromorne 8'   Swell Organ ... Manual III Bourdon 16' Bourdon 8' Flote traversiere 8' Viole de gambe 8' Voix celeste 8' Principal 4' Fl=3DFBte octaviante 4' Octavin 2' - I assume this IS flute toned, or is it actually ...... an Octave Mixture IV Basson 16' Trompette 8' Hautbois 8' > Pedal   Hey, it's sooooo nice to see a respected classical builder presenting a 'real' pedal department, that is completely straight, no extensions, no borrowings, no derivations..   OOooooppppsss - not in this organ <g>   Bourdon 32' (as some one more respected than I once said, a 32' Bourdon is an expensive draught!!) Contrebasse 16' Prestant (Gt) 16' - as for thi sone on the Great. Bourdon (32) 16' Octave 8' Spillpfeife (Gt) 8' Violoncelle (Gt) 8' Octave 4' Posaune 16' Trommeten (Gt) 8' - What - not even it's own 8' reed???? Don't play any "loud" French music on this 'French' instrument. It won't work. Trompette (Gt) 8' - as above. >   KE  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2487 - 11/06/01 From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 07 Nov 2001 15:24:00 -0800   The usual mixture of languages (grin) ... one of my PET peeves ... some comments, though:   Ken Earl wrote:   > Bruce Cornelly wrote>> > > >>However, the bass response may be different. We shall see! > > A few questions / critiques of the spec you sent to the list follow..... > > Great Organ ..Manual I > Prestant 16' (these are usually of 4' pitch in French > instruments, and are the 'octave' to the Montre) > Octave 8' - My my, an Octave to a double sub octave = prestant.   That would indicate to me that it's a normal 16'-based Great ... = "Prestant" is used interchangeably with "Prinzipal" in German and Dutch nomenclature, = and indicates the pitch upon which the division is founded.   > > A Montre perhaps??? > Spillpfeife 8' > Flute harmonique 8' > Violoncelle 8' > Octave 4' > Rohrflote 4' > Twelfth 2 2/3' - cannot be a twelfth if the first Octave is at = 8'. > Fifteenth 2' ditto as for 12th > Terz 1 3/5' - ditto as for 12th, unless it's flute toned.   Mmmm ... sorta. But a lot of builders name it that way, even if there IS a = 16' Prestant.   > > Mixture V-VII > Trommeten 8' > Trompette 8' > > Alternatively, do we actually have a 'standard' great here, with some = fancy > names, which is actually based upon an 8' principal?? > > Positiv Organ ... Manual II > Prestant 8' - ah, a sub octave Prestant???   See above ... the Great is based upon a 16' Prestant, the Positiv upon an = 8' Prestant.   > Gedackt 8' > Octave 4' Now, this one should be called Prestant. > Baarpijp 4' - is this a reed?? If not, another fancy name > pretending to be something it's not. > Nasard 2 2/3' > Doublet 2' - does this have two ranks, as in 15th and 22nd, = if > not, it's a Fifteenth, or a Piccolo of some description. Another fancy = name > I suspect!!   Nope. Normal name for a French 2' Principal, spelled funny.   > Quarte de Nasard 2' - once again, does this have 2 ranks, the 12th = and > the 15th?? If not, is this not a misnomer??   Nope. "A fourth above the Nasard." Standard name for French wide-scale 2' = stop.   > > Tierce 1 3/5' > Scharff IV > Dulcian 16' > Cromorne 8' > > Swell Organ ... Manual III > Bourdon 16' > Bourdon 8' > Flote traversiere 8' > Viole de gambe 8' > Voix celeste 8' > Principal 4' > Fl=3DFBte octaviante 4' > Octavin 2' - I assume this IS flute toned, or is it actually > ..... an Octave   I think GDH sometimes (usually?) built it as a principal, but it's = SUPPOSED to be a flute.   > > Mixture IV > Basson 16' > Trompette 8' > Hautbois 8' > > > Pedal > > Hey, it's sooooo nice to see a respected classical builder presenting a > 'real' pedal department, that is completely straight, no extensions, no > borrowings, no derivations.. > > OOooooppppsss - not in this organ <g> > > Bourdon 32' (as some one more respected than I once said, a = 32' > Bourdon is an expensive draught!!) > Contrebasse 16' > Prestant (Gt) 16' - as for thi sone on the Great. > Bourdon (32) 16' > Octave 8' > Spillpfeife (Gt) 8' > Violoncelle (Gt) 8' > Octave 4' > Posaune 16' > Trommeten (Gt) 8' - What - not even it's own 8' reed???? Don't = play > any "loud" French music on this 'French' instrument. It won't work. > Trompette (Gt) 8' - as above. > > > > KE >   I had to chuckle when I first saw the SMU Fisk spec ... the old A-S had = more independent Pedal stops (grin). What was anathema in electric-action pedal organs (borrowing, extending, etc.) is now acceptable in tracker organs, I guess.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Temperaments From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 18:53:50 EST     --part1_8e.1db7cf2a.291b238e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/7/01 2:50:24 PM Eastern Standard Time, manderusa@earthlink.net writes:     > "Do you mean that the pianos in, > e.g. Carnegie Hall, are now tuned by someone staring into a machine? I > really doubt it." And of course, he is correct. Most fine tuners set a > temperament quickly and precisely by ear, almost by instinct. I tuned my = way > through college, and even my simple mind was eventually able to produce = a > temperament in reasonable time. They did not always proof out the first > time, but most of the time they did. >   I learned to tune pianos because I could not find a local tuner who would tune without a "machine" and I was just sick of the awful temperament that =   resulted. The week I learned to set a temperament was quite a trial for =   me, experimenting.. trial and many errors... all with Thursday rehearsal bearing down on me. I finally managed a temperament that worked. Even = then it was not "equal" because I had always been told by tuners that they slightly favored certain keys depending upon what the owner of the piano played on it. Baptists got very rich sounding D-flat keys, too!   This was then transferred to the organ, when the church I was playing for = got their pipe organ. I listened intently as the temperament was set. I = would love to have a small pipe organ with one rank within reach so that I could =   play around with various temperaments. It is so much fun, and listening = to the changes in key colour and chord resolution. Music is so much more exciting with this added ingredient. Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_8e.1db7cf2a.291b238e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/7/01 2:50:24 PM Eastern Standard Time, manderusa@earthlink.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">"Do you mean that = the pianos in, <BR>e.g. Carnegie Hall, are now tuned by someone staring into a machine? = &nbsp;I <BR>really doubt it." And of course, he is correct. Most fine tuners set a <BR>temperament quickly and precisely by ear, almost by instinct. I tuned = my way <BR>through college, and even my simple mind was eventually able to = produce a <BR>temperament in reasonable time. They did not always proof out the = first <BR>time, but most of the time they did. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I learned to tune pianos because I could not find a local tuner who = would tune without a "machine" and I was just sick of the awful = temperament that resulted. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The week I learned to set a = temperament was quite a trial for me, experimenting.. trial and many = errors... &nbsp;all with Thursday rehearsal bearing down on me. &nbsp;I = finally managed a temperament that worked. &nbsp;&nbsp;Even then it was = not "equal" because I had always been told by tuners that they slightly = favored certain keys depending upon what the owner of the piano played on = it. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Baptists got very rich sounding D-flat keys, too! = &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>This was then transferred to the organ, when the church I was playing = for got their pipe organ. &nbsp;I listened intently as the temperament was = set. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I would love to have a small pipe organ with one = rank within reach so that I could play around with various temperaments. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It is so much fun, and listening to the changes in key colour = and chord resolution. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Music is so much more exciting with this added ingredient. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_8e.1db7cf2a.291b238e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Temperaments From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Wed, 07 Nov 2001 15:54:32 -0800   I can't agree with all that Paul says. The best tuners here would disdain using any device to tune an organ or a piano. My son tunes organs, including what is arguably the largest church organ in Australia. He and every other good piano and organ tuner that I know of tunes by ear and the result is very satisfactory. He uses fourths and fifths right up the scale. To use an aural device to tune will not give the best result.   Regarding Paul's remark that the players "temper" their instruments, what on earth does he mean by that? These instruments are tuned to a tempered scale and although they can be blown sharp or flat deliberately, that is not done. The ear is used to PLAY IN TUNE WITH THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS not to go seeking some form of temperament. I play the oboe and the other instruments in the our city orchestra tune to me. That is because the oboe is the most stable instrument. It is also tuned to equal temperament.   I would agree with the remarks about "bad" aural tuners. If they are incompetent the result could be very bad. I woud doubt also whether Carnegie Hall or any other prestige music venue would have its pianos tuned by someone using a tuning device. They are for amateurs and the result will be amateurish.   Bob Elms.   "Emmons, Paul" wrote: > > Tuned but not tempered. The players do that. > >It is precisely because some tuners have worked with inferior > >aural tuners, or entirely by ear with faulty ideas, that equal = temperament has > >many times failed to satisfy. I have heard "ear" temperaments called > "equal" > >that were unbelievably bad! Lets be sure we get it right before we = call it > >Equal Temperament. > > Do you mean that the pianos in, e.g. Carnegie Hall, are now tuned by = someone > staring into a machine? I really doubt it. > > I heard a radio interview with a piano technician expert enough to be = hired > by the managers of such places. He disdained the idea that an = electronic > aid was of any use to a tuner working for a customer with such high > expectations. That was, I admit, probably fifteen or twenty years ago, = but > what has changed since? > Of course an incompetent tuner (like myself, God knows, whenever I try = to > "lay a temperament") will probably botch his attempt at equal = temperament > without a machine (and probably even with one). And incompetence gives = a > bad name to whatever it touches. But perhaps this only underlines my > feeling that it isn't just science, there is still art in it. > > Paul >    
(back) Subject: Ken Earl vs Bruce Cornelly From: "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 8 Nov 2001 13:19:16 +1300   Bruce - A number of criticisms by Ken here, some justified, some not, but no = comment on your actual design. Shame on you both (grin). You should know by now = that not one organ has ever been built that hasn't had its design attacked by several people, whatever its musical worth. I shall have to fill in for = you (double grin). It does seem Bruce has heard of some fancy names, and used them a bit willy-nilly. GREAT Why a 16ft diapason here, when there is only one Mixture? A 16ft metal Gedackt plus the Mixture divided into a III and a II would be more use. = The use of Prestant and Montre is confusing, and Ken's comment. A mixture of languages, unnecessarily. PRESTANT is a stop that literally stands in = front of things, i.e. a showcase stop. MONTRE means "show", so the ranks are literally the same thing and it doesn't matter a hoot what pitch they are. What's wrong with Principal and Octave anyway? Bruce, you have no stopped rank on the Great - for old kinds of uses, a stopt flute on the Great is better than a harmonic or tapered one, at 8ft. And why the French Cello? I really believe a genuine Dulciana (a la olde Englishe, not a string) is ideal - gives you a soft stop that you can use = to accompany anything on another deck - even a soft 8ft flute somewhere else, or a reed with the box closed. "Mood music" is good on this, too. Better not a Rohrflote here, but something a little more bland, maybe your Spillpfeife or a Koppel. Twelfth and Fifteenth, Ken, have an honoured history as names, whether a 16ft or 8ft Diapason below it. Better to call the next rank a Seventeenth, and make it very similar scaling and tone, giving you a fabulous Principal-toned Sesquialtera possibility (listen to Zwolle's!!) A flute 17th sounds awful with any combination of 12th and 15th. The Mixture - if you don't divide this in two, you'll have only a = 15th between the 4fts and the full-out, which is most difficult. And why two Trumpets here? Unnecessary duplication, especially as you have a French Swell Trumpet. A big unenclosed Regal is historically OK here, and incredibly useful. SWELL Why two 8ft flutes? Flote Traversiere is a nonsense name combination of German and French. When you have already specified a Harmonic flute 8ft on the Great, there's no need for another. Perhaps a Geigen or Gemshorn here = at 8ft instead? Why say Flute Octaviante, when just Flute is adequate? After all, Octaviante merely means octave, and that's obvious if the rank is a 4ft. Yes, Octavin is a Flute, and the 2ft here would be of much greater = use as a dual-purpose Gemshorn. No Clarion? If you play up an octave on your Basson, then you can dispense with the separate Hautbois and put in a Clarion, as Octave to the = Trompette, instead. If you wish, call it Clairon, but most people would think that mrely a spelling mistake.   POSITIV The 8ft, Ken, may well be a Prestant, if pipes of it are in the showcase. Swiss/French organs have Prestants at right down to 32ft pitch, so a 4ft-only ruling is wrong. Here's where I would have my colourful Rohrflote at 8ft, instead of the more bland Gedackt. Octave - Call it Principal, as Prestant is not necessarily correct here. Yes, a Baarpijp is often a reed, but if it is a tapered rank, as I am guessing, it could be called Gemshorn or suchlike, instead of introducing = an old Dutch name. Doublet should of course be Doublette, and it can be of = 2ft, of course, Ken, as sometimes the name implies merely 2 octaves above the = 8ft Principal. Quarte de Nasard is indeed acceptable here, as it does not = imply two ranks of pipes, but it is a 4th above the 2 2/3ft, hence the title. PEDAL Depends on the acoustics and the scaling whether a 32ft Bourdon is any = use, and the size of the building. In our Christchurch Town Hall organ in NZ here, Rieger a few years ago put in a vast-scaled 32ft Bourdon in a = tracker organ of about 28 stops. It's absolutely stunning, far more effective than most open 32fts I know - bottom CCCC is about 32 inches square, I believe. The 16ft Prestant would be better called plain "Open Metal" or "Principal", whether in the showcase or not. If it is open metal to CCC, then the Contrebasse should be open wood. What, no 8ft stopped flute rank here, but rather two 8ft open metal ranks? Why?Rather than borrow the 2nd open 8ft from the Great, I'd rather have = the very-cheap alternative of extending the Bourdon 16ft up to 8ft, and then = to 4ft. Organists often make the big mistake of giving no soft 4ft Pedal = stop. Same applies to the reeds - You have far too many stops plain borrowed = from the Great, making the pedal division effectively always coupled. Better, again, to have the Posaune extended to both 8ft and 4ft, and forget the direct borrows, though the Swell Basson 16ft could very usefully be added: very often, the 16ft Basson, or Contra Oboe if you wish, can give added clarity to a Principal chorus on Great and Pedal without resorting to the over-loud farting of a Bombarde or Posaune. As mentioned, it's a shame you have no 4ft manual or pedal reed anywhere.   Anyway, take no offence from the above: I'm possibly hearing in my head different tones for the stops than you are, and i have no idea of your building or its size or acoustics.   Many regards, Ross (in New Zealand)      
(back) Subject: New Fisk -- First Presbyterian - Gainesville FL From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 19:08:45 EST     --part1_112.74bf82b.291b270d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I dropped by this afternoon to check progress on the installation of the = new Fisk. It's amazing what they have done in three days.   The swell box is up and shutters are in. Swell chest is in place. Pedal =   chests for the Bourdon 32 and pipes are in as well as the 16 open wood Contrebass which appears to be recycled from somewhere. The console mechanism is in, but no keyboards yet. The framework for the case is up.   I checked and the configuration is that the Swell sits on the shelf, = flanked by the Pedal. The "case" sits on the top level of the choir and = contains the console with the Great at impost level and the Positiv above. = There's alot of organ going into a smallish space, but nothing looks crowded = (yet).   I did get some photos, but my digital camera refuses to communicate with = MGI photo suite. I keep getting a message "unable to connect with Twain source". If anyone knows how to remedy this situation, I'll be really grateful.       Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_112.74bf82b.291b270d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I dropped by this = afternoon to check progress on the installation of the new Fisk. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It's amazing what they have done in three days. <BR> <BR>The swell box is up and shutters are in. &nbsp;Swell chest is in = place. &nbsp;&nbsp;Pedal chests for the Bourdon 32 and pipes are in as = well as the 16 open wood Contrebass which appears to be recycled from = somewhere. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The console mechanism is in, but no keyboards = yet. &nbsp;&nbsp;The framework for the case is up. <BR> <BR>I checked and the configuration is that the Swell sits on the shelf, = flanked by the Pedal. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The "case" sits on the top level = of the choir and contains the console with the Great at impost level and = the Positiv above. &nbsp;&nbsp;There's alot of organ going into a smallish = space, but nothing looks crowded (yet). &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>I did get some photos, but my digital camera refuses to communicate = with MGI photo suite. &nbsp;&nbsp;I keep getting a message "unable to = connect with Twain source". &nbsp;If anyone knows how to remedy this = situation, I'll be really grateful. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_112.74bf82b.291b270d_boundary--