PipeChat Digest #2492 - Thursday, November 8, 2001
 
Re: Ken Earl vs Bruce Cornelly
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: New England Church Positions
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Memory chips for Rodgers Trio 321 B
  by "pat and ian" <patian@senet.com.au>
Tuning etc
  by "Jonathan Roussos" <jroussos@san.rr.com>
Re: Tuning etc
  by "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ken Earl vs Bruce Cornelly From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 19:20:09 EST     --part1_88.ef6c4ad.291b29b9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/7/01 7:08:48 PM Eastern Standard Time, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz writes:     > Anyway, take no offence from the above: I'm possibly hearing in my head > different tones for the stops than you are, and i have no idea of your > building or its size or acoustics. >   I absolutely love this kind of criticism. Mainly because I had nothing = to do with the design of the organ, and am merely passing along the = information. I'm not even a member of the church, yea, even the denomination (except that I was baptised a Presbyterian -- but I have been forgiven for that!!) = ;-)   Many of the criticisms seem not to take into account that the organ is mechanical action. I don't agree with the pedal borrows, myself, and = would certainly not have had an international design. This should have been a tip-off to those who chided me for the inconsistencies. I would have = chosen a specific period and stuck with it. I can, however, see the usefulness = of having a decidedly French trumpet and a decidedly German trumpet, rather = than a compromised "trumpette" ;-) . There are, of course, other things = that I would have done differently, except that I must admit being overjoyed = when I saw the straight/flat pedalboard!!!   It will be interesting to see how the principal choruses of the Great and Positiv compare with each other tonally. At Holy Trinity (V-R) the = Great is decidedly English whereas the Positiv is decidely German. Although it =   makes the organ somewhat schizophrenic, it does make it versatile. Life = is a compromise, although I enjoy it more with less! ;-)   It will be very interesting to see how this organ sounds. We'll sort = of know in a month or so. In seven months we'll be sure!   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_88.ef6c4ad.291b29b9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/7/01 7:08:48 PM Eastern Standard Time, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Anyway, take no = offence from the above: I'm possibly hearing in my head <BR>different tones for the stops than you are, and i have no idea of your <BR>building or its size or acoustics. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I absolutely love this kind of criticism. &nbsp;&nbsp;Mainly because I = had nothing to do with the design of the organ, and am merely passing = along the information. &nbsp;&nbsp;I'm not even a member of the church, = yea, even the denomination (except that I was baptised a Presbyterian -- = but I have been forgiven for that!!) &nbsp;;-) &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Many of the criticisms seem not to take into account that the organ is = mechanical action. &nbsp;I don't agree with the pedal borrows, myself, and = would certainly not have had an international design. &nbsp;This should = have been a tip-off to those who chided me for the inconsistencies. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I would have chosen a specific period and stuck with it. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I can, however, see the usefulness of having a decidedly = French trumpet and a decidedly German trumpet, rather than a compromised = "trumpette" &nbsp;;-) &nbsp;. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;There are, of course, = other things that I would have done differently, except that I must admit = being overjoyed when I saw the straight/flat pedalboard!!! <BR> <BR>It will be interesting to see how the principal choruses of the Great = and Positiv compare with each other tonally. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;At Holy Trinity (V-R) the Great is = decidedly English whereas the Positiv is decidely German. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Although it makes the organ somewhat schizophrenic, it does = make it versatile. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Life is a compromise, although I = enjoy it more with less! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>It will be very &nbsp;interesting to see how this organ sounds. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;We'll sort of know in a month or so. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;In seven months we'll be sure! <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_88.ef6c4ad.291b29b9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: New England Church Positions From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 20:49:57 -0600   <arpschneider@starband.net> wrote: > In the same way they all know everything about organbuilding > but are amazed at the fact that Reservoir tops actually MOVE > when the organ is used   It is probably just as well to keep them in ignorance about this. When I was working in Pennsylvania, I once turned up in a church to service their Moller organ. There seemed to be something wrong with the winding system, and this prompted me to go down into the basement and look at the blower room. I discovered that someone in the church had discovered that the static reservoir lid could move. Accordingly they had screwed it down.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Memory chips for Rodgers Trio 321 B From: "pat and ian" <patian@senet.com.au> Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2001 14:51:29 +1030   Anyone know where I can obtain memory chips 74C200, U5 and U6? Ian.    
(back) Subject: Tuning etc From: "Jonathan Roussos" <jroussos@san.rr.com> Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 23:47:44 -0800   I would like to make a few comments regarding the tuning discussion.   Re the comments about the use of electronic tuning aids. While it is true that concert tunings will be performed by ear alone, = there are many fine tuners who chose to use an electronic tuning aid. The = current devices can be used with excellent results. Many tuners will use them because they can speed the process and help with consistency.   The best devices can be programmed with an optimum tuning for a particular model of piano, and can remember the tuning for a particular piano.   Of course, the test is in the hearing and a good tuner will make numerous aural checks on an electronically aided tuning.   If someone shows up with a chromatic guitar type electronic tuner there is cause to worry, but using the right device, a truly professional result = may be achieved.   Regarding octave stretching,   The reason that a different "stretch" s required for different types of pianos is due to the physics of a stiff vibrating string. The mathematics is beyond my undergraduate acoustics book, but the harmonic structure is dependent on the stiffness of the string.   The stiffness of the string will cause the "harmonics" of the string to to be at a higher frequency that would be expected. A standard form of "stretch" would be to tune the fundamental of the octave to the first harmonic of the note. Or you might chose a higher pair of harmonics.   The difference between pianos is due to the string length. The same note = on a concert grand will have a much longer string than say a spinet. The spinet will have stiffer strings and require more stretch. The bottom octave of some of these is so inharmonic as to make it very difficult to chose a pitch to tune.   Jon Roussos Organist / Director Christ the King Episcopal Alpine, CA    
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning etc From: "Ross Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 8 Nov 2001 22:56:43 +1300   Tuning pianos is certainly different from tuning organ pipes. Often in = small pianos the 5th harmonic is pretty dominant - i.e. the "Tierce" or "seventeenth", so much so that tuners will often "tune" the note to that harmonic rather than the fundamental. With a longer string, that harmonic = is less prominent and there is a much greater chance of a good fundamental. = So, the result is that a large grand and a small upright will not be in tune with each other in the lower octaves, to a greater or lesser extent. That, too, is why an upright piano often sounds plain horrid with an organ. Ross -----Original Message----- From: Jonathan Roussos <jroussos@san.rr.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 08 November 2001 20:49 Subject: Tuning etc     >I would like to make a few comments regarding the tuning discussion. > >Re the comments about the use of electronic tuning aids. >While it is true that concert tunings will be performed by ear alone, = there >are many fine tuners who chose to use an electronic tuning aid. The current >devices can be used with excellent results. Many tuners will use them >because they can speed the process and help with consistency. > >The best devices can be programmed with an optimum tuning for a = particular >model of piano, and can remember the tuning for a particular piano. > >Of course, the test is in the hearing and a good tuner will make numerous >aural checks on an electronically aided tuning. > >If someone shows up with a chromatic guitar type electronic tuner there = is >cause to worry, but using the right device, a truly professional result = may >be achieved. > >Regarding octave stretching, > >The reason that a different "stretch" s required for different types of >pianos is due to the physics of a stiff vibrating string. The = mathematics >is beyond my undergraduate acoustics book, but the harmonic structure is >dependent on the stiffness of the string. > >The stiffness of the string will cause the "harmonics" of the string to = to >be at a higher frequency that would be expected. A standard form of >"stretch" would be to tune the fundamental of the octave to the first >harmonic of the note. Or you might chose a higher pair of harmonics. > >The difference between pianos is due to the string length. The same note on >a concert grand will have a much longer string than say a spinet. The >spinet will have stiffer strings and require more stretch. The bottom >octave of some of these is so inharmonic as to make it very difficult to >chose a pitch to tune. > >Jon Roussos >Organist / Director >Christ the King Episcopal >Alpine, CA > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >