PipeChat Digest #2502 - Friday, November 16, 2001
 
Diminishing Voice Levels
  by "pat and ian" <patian@senet.com.au>
Concert Announcement  XPosted
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Re: Diminishing Voice Levels
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
RE: Concert Announcement  XPosted
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Concert Announcement - Ken Cowen - Boston - 16 Nov
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Joseph Clokey (x posted)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: Joseph Clokey (x posted)
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Concert Announcement - Ken Cowen - Boston - 16 Nov
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Afghan Music is Back
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Have you a copy?
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Diminishing Voice Levels
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Diminishing Voice Levels
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
 

(back) Subject: Diminishing Voice Levels From: "pat and ian" <patian@senet.com.au> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 21:52:40 +1030   Can anything be done to level the Main generator voices on a Trio 321 B = from becoming progressively weaker as you play up the keyboard? E.G. the Diapason, etc. almost disappears from approx. the top two octaves on a 61 note manual. Has anyone encountered this "problem"? I play classical as = well as theatre style on this organ. Ian.    
(back) Subject: Concert Announcement XPosted From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 11:19:10 -0500   Hello Listers,   Reading through the Boston Globe this morning I spied in the Calendar = section an anouncement about Ken Cowan playing a recital at Immaculate Conception Church on Friday Evening 11/16 = at 8:00 PM.   Suggested donation is $10.00. Works of Reger, Bossi, Tchaikovsky, Widor, = Liszt.   If you are in the area try to make it great 1863 E&GG Hook Organ.   775 Harrison Avenue Boston, MA (617) 536-8440   Cheers, Mack      
(back) Subject: Re: Diminishing Voice Levels From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 08:51:55 -0800   Pat & Ian,   I'll look into the situation, as I have documentation on that organ, to see what can be done with the main generator voices.   Vern, Sound Research   pat and ian wrote: > > Can anything be done to level the Main generator voices on a Trio 321 B = from > becoming progressively weaker as you play up the keyboard? E.G. the > Diapason, etc. almost disappears from approx. the top two octaves on a = 61 > note manual. Has anyone encountered this "problem"? I play classical as = well > as theatre style on this organ. > Ian. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Concert Announcement XPosted From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 13:02:40 -0500   Dear Mack:   Does Ken realize that he's competing against the American opening of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's-- er, Sorcerer's-- Stone?   I would think that our young-at-heart choirmasters have long since = arranged to take a carload of choristers to an evening showing of that.   But I'll wish him luck. Maybe those attending the movie will learn the trick of being in two places at once, always useful for the future...       > -----Original Message----- > From: Mack [SMTP:mack02445@mindspring.com] > Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2001 11:19 AM > To: Pipechat; Piporg-L > Subject: Concert Announcement XPosted > > Hello Listers, > > Reading through the Boston Globe this morning I spied in the Calendar > section an anouncement about Ken Cowan > playing a recital at Immaculate Conception Church on Friday Evening = 11/16 > at 8:00 PM. > > Suggested donation is $10.00. Works of Reger, Bossi, Tchaikovsky, = Widor, > Liszt. > > If you are in the area try to make it great 1863 E&GG Hook Organ. > > 775 Harrison Avenue > Boston, MA (617) 536-8440 > > Cheers, > Mack > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Concert Announcement - Ken Cowen - Boston - 16 Nov From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 14:09:43 -0500       "Emmons, Paul" wrote: > > Dear Mack: > > Does Ken realize that he's competing against the American opening of = Harry > Potter and the Philosopher's-- er, Sorcerer's-- Stone? >   In Boston, organ recitalists often benefit greatly as the overflow crowd = from a sold out movie give up waiting in line and go to their second favorite activity..   Organ Recitals! In fact that's why the riot gates were installed at the = Busch at Harvard. It was never determined whether the unruly mob rioted because they were denied admission to hear E.P. Biggs or that the Busch offered free beer just like the gardens in Florida..   Stan :)    
(back) Subject: Joseph Clokey (x posted) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 16:02:17 -0500   Can anyone kindly inform me about Joseph Clokey( 1890 - 1957): his = birth and death places, places of education and employment, major works, etc.? = I see very little evidence of his music these days. My choir is going to sing his unison anthem "A Canticle of Peace" for Advent I, and it would be nice to know something of the man. My first = real accompanying opportunity was as pianist in 7th grade for his short, easy cantata _Child Jesus_ . Any help whatsoever will be much appreciated.   Thanx.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: RE: Joseph Clokey (x posted) From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 16:40:30 -0500   Karl Moyer asks:   > Can anyone kindly inform me about Joseph Clokey( 1890 - 1957): his birth and death places, places of education and employment, major works, etc.? = I see very little evidence of his music these days.     Quoting from Contemporary American Composers: a biographical dictionary:   CLOKEY, JOSEPH WADDELL   b. New Albany, Ind., 28 Aug. 1890; d. Covina, Calif., 14 Sep. 1961 [yes, = it says 1961, not 1957]. Studied at Miami Univ., Oxford Ohio, B.A. 1912; and at Cincinnati Cons. He taught at Pomona Coll., 1926-39; at Miami Univ. 1915-26, dean, School of Fine Arts, 1939-46. His works include 3 operas, = a music drama, orchestral works, chamber music, choral works, songs, organ pieces.   I also recall a treatise on church music that he wrote, brief but = impressive for its high standards: _In every corner sing; an outline of church music for the layman_. I gathered from the tenor of this, and the fact that it was published in 1945 by the Episcopal Morehouse-Gorham, that he was probably an Anglican.   I once sat next to a man at an AGO convention banquet who insisted that Clokey should be pronounced to rhyme with "bouquet", but I don't know how much stock to put in this claim.   For some reason, I used to assume in my youth that his was just another = pen ever-flowing with post-Victorian schlock, but when I found the Canticle of Peace in a choir library, it turned out to be considerably better than = that. He's probably under-appreciated.   Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: Concert Announcement - Ken Cowen - Boston - 16 Nov From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 16:52:06 -0500   >In Boston, organ recitalists often benefit greatly as the overflow crowd from a sold out movie give up waiting in line and go to their second favorite activity..   Ah yes, Boston may save the day for Ken.   Did you hear the wonderful anecdote attributed to Marilyn Mason?   At the reception after a recital that she gave in Boston, a brahmin matron is said to have come up to her and asked, "Are you one of the Lowell Masons?" She replied, "No, I'm just Miz Mason from Michigan."   "What a pity," the matron said. "In Boston we think that breeding is *everything*!"   Whereupon Ms. Mason exclaimed, "Well, in Michigan we think that it's a lot of fun, but not 'everything'"!   Paul    
(back) Subject: Afghan Music is Back From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 21:02:21 EST   Here's an Associated Press item that I found to be interesting. It really =   makes you wonder what it would be like to live under those conditions. Please accept my apologies if you get upset by non-instrument specific = posts on these lists.   Richard ****************   Afghan Music Returns By Kim Curtis Associated Press November 15, 2001     FREMONT, Calif. (AP) -- Naghma, an Afghan singer who fled her country = after receiving death threats, watched for years from afar as the Taliban = outlawed music.   Tapes were ripped from cassettes and hung like brown streamers from poles = and trees. A man caught hiring musicians for his daughter's wedding went to = jail for 10 days. For musicians, performing could mean death.   ``Unfortunately, serving others in our country is considered a crime, particularly in the arts. I was an artist. The community itself was = against art and music,'' said Naghma, 36.   After Taliban soldiers retreated this week from Kabul, the capital, and = some other parts of the country, people spontaneously celebrated with music. = They held tiny tape recorders to their ears and danced in the streets.   Few outside Afghanistan could imagine a world without music. But when the Taliban took over in 1996, it banned all instruments and singing. A 1999 edict states: ``If any music cassette (is) found in a shop, the shopkeeper =   should be imprisoned and the shop locked.'' If there was music or dancing = at a wedding, ``the head of the family will be arrested and punished.''   Naghma and other Afghan musicians have kept their music alive from afar -- =   and despite the Taliban's five-year rule, they remain popular.   Their music can be found in bins of cassettes in Pakistani bazaars, or on = the Internet. It plays from loudspeakers in town squares in Iran, or in living-room concerts in Afghan-American homes. It was found among the treasured possessions of refugees leaving Afghanistan in recent weeks.   ``Without music, I could not live -- not even for one hour,'' said another =   Afghan singer, Mahwash, through a translator. Mahwash, who like many = Afghans uses just one name, lives in Fremont, the nation's largest Afghan-American =   community. She gives concerts, performs at weddings -- or just sings in = the shower to keep her music alive.   Mahwash says she is anxious for peace so she can go back and ``sing for = all the women who suffered under the various governments, to reduce a little = of their pain and suffering.''   Thousands of musicians have fled Afghanistan in the past 20 years. Some = left because of the communists, who ruled from 1978 to 1992 and restricted what =   kinds of music could be played. Others left during the chaos after the communists' fall and the pullout of Soviet troops. The few musicians who remained fled or went undergound when the Taliban cracked down.   Naghma -- whose face is seen all over the Middle East, on walls, on = posters, painted on the sides of trucks -- has never considered herself political. = But she became a star in Afghanistan under communist rule, and her popularity made her a target of authorities. First the mujahadeen wanted her dead, = she said; then the communists did.   She said the communists killed her sister, mistaking her for the singer. Fearing that her husband and children were next, Naghma fled to Pakistan a =   decade ago. Then Taliban sympathizers there threatened to kill her.   Two years ago, Naghma settled with her family in Fremont. Last year, she = was granted U.S. political asylum. She continues to record and perform.   ``If I don't speak out for the rights of the women and the people and the peace of the nation, then who will do it?'' she said in a telephone = interview from Pakistan, where she was on a secretive visit to record an album with musicians who live there.   ``I and other educated people must do it. We are threatened, but it will = not stop us.''   Long before Afghanistan's current borders were drawn by British India and Russia in the late 19th century, the country enjoyed a rich musical tradition. As early as the 1860s, Indian musicians were invited to perform = at court in Kabul.   Afghan music distinguished itself from its Indian roots with its use of spiritual and mystical poetry sung with heavy vibrato; a favorite subject = is romantic love. The singer is usually accompanied by a harmonium, which = looks and sounds much like an accordion. The singing is punctuated by fast, instrumental sections.   Afghanistan's national instrument is the rubab, a short-necked lute. Long-necked lutes like the dambura and the uniquely Afghan tanbur and = dutar are also widespread.   Before the Taliban, music was sold in stores, and played on loudspeakers = in town squares and at festivals. In the 1960s, Radio Afghanistan was = launched, creating an audience for modern, popular versions of Afghan music. Radio = also boosted the low social status of musicians.   Ahmad Zahir, who was killed in 1979 but remains popular through recordings =   and the Internet, came from a wealthy and cosmopolitan family; his father = was briefly prime minister. Zahir played electric organ and sang, accompanied = by electric guitars, trumpets and other Western instruments.   Radio also allowed women singers to achieve fame. Mahwash, 54, first = worked as a secretary at the radio station. Her musical career began in the = 1960s, and in 1976 the Afghan government gave her the title of master musician. = She fled in 1989.   While Naghma and Mahwash help keep traditional Afghan music alive, Qader Eshpari, 29, performs for a new generation.   He grew up in Kabul, where his brother owned a music store, and listened = to Santana and Donna Summer. He's been in the United States since 1983, but ``the traditional music was still in the back of my head,'' he said.   He spent months searching for bits and pieces of Afghan instrumental and Eastern music on the Internet, albums and CDs. Then he transferred those small sampled songs to an electronic keyboard, giving him the ability to recreate the sound with a single keystroke.   Now his Middle Eastern-style electronic dance music reaches thousands of Afghans scattered across the globe via the Internet.   He believes Afghan Americans are still drawn to Afghan music ``automatically.''   ``My nieces and nephews were born here, but their parents played Afghan = music at home. To them it makes more sense,'' he said from his music store in Newark, another east San Francisco Bay suburb.   For older expatriates who miss their homeland, it's a joy to hear Mahwash = and Naghma perform.   Sher Ahmad, executive director of the Fremont-based International Refugee Services, Inc., recalls his desperate quest for tickets to a sold-out 1968 =   Mahwash concert in Afghanistan. He ended up settling for tickets that got = him close enough to hear but not see her.   ``A few years later, I was able to get into her concert and I sat in the front row,'' he said.   But when Ahmad visited his hometown of Kandahar last year, he found a deafening silence.   ``It's like you're walking through dead bodies, through a graveyard,'' he said. ``Only the mountains were the same. Everything else was not the same = at all.''  
(back) Subject: Have you a copy? From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 20:17:24 -0800   I need a copy of the words of an Appalachian Carol (sometimes called "Judah's Land"). I have the music and the words for the first verse, which commences: "To Thee with joy I sing Sweet child that heaven did bring Now Judah's land will ring with Thy praises...."   I used this carol many years ago with my children's choir but have been unable to find the book it was in, and I wish to use it this Christmas.   If anyone can help I would be grateful if the words of other verses could be emailed to the above address. Thank you, Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: Re: Diminishing Voice Levels From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 18:41:12 -0000   Hello Pat & Ian and all,   The same problem afflicts my Conn. It's due to the very simple circuitry that's used. There's a generator with lots of harmonics and a crude filter that reduces the higher ones - one filter applies to whole keyboard range The result is the diapason sounds like a string at the bottom gets softer and flutier at the top. It's only OK in the middle. There's not a thing (short of rebuilding the organ) you can do about it. Using the Tibia and strings together and kidding yourself it sounds like a diapason gives a more level response since the tibias (flutes ?) are generated separately for each note and are more or less level.   I don't know a thing about the Rogers Trio 321 B - is it an analogue organ = ? If so the cause of the problem is likely to be the same.   Best wishes   Bruce Miles   mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk ----- Original Message ----- From: "pat and ian" <patian@senet.com.au> To: "pipechat, Theatreorgans, EORG, Rodgers" <patian@senet.com.au> Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2001 11:22 AM Subject: Diminishing Voice Levels     > Can anything be done to level the Main generator voices on a Trio 321 B from > becoming progressively weaker as you play up the keyboard? E.G. the > Diapason, etc. almost disappears from approx. the top two octaves on a = 61 > note manual. Has anyone encountered this "problem"? I play classical as well > as theatre style on this organ. > Ian. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Diminishing Voice Levels From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 23:55:19 -0800   Pat & Ian,   The problem is as Bruce described, there is a single preamp (with low pass filters) for the Diapason, as well as a single voicing filter. What really needs to be done, is to have 5 preamps and 5 filters, Rodgers skimped here. Some of the filter components could be changed, but that might make them too brite to sound right at the lower pitches. There are 2 resistors per each keyer called R7 and R8, these are String/Diapason scaling resistors, there are 61 sets per manual, these could be changed out to increase the top-end level. (lots of work) the easiest would be to split the busses, add the extra filters with a simple mixing circuit at the output to recombine the filter outputs. The next trick is getting someone to build and install it for a reasonable costs. If you're handy, you could probably install it with a set of good instructions.   I happen to own one of these too, I have added MIDI to mine, and use an Ahlborn for the classic sounds, and an SC-55 to enhance the theatrical sounds.   Vern, Sound Research http://www.foothill.net/~soundres   pat and ian wrote: > > Can anything be done to level the Main generator voices on a Trio 321 B = from > becoming progressively weaker as you play up the keyboard?