PipeChat Digest #2522 - Thursday, November 29, 2001
 
Looking for Nutcrackers . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Max Reger and Christmas Carols
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Dupre
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Carols from King's DVD
  by "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com>
A Little Holiday Article
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: A Little Holiday Article
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
RE: OFF-TOPIC: Advent and Christmas
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
George Wright
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: Advent and Christmas
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Looking for Nutcrackers . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 06:50:48 -0600   Has anyone seen or played a 4-hand version or version for two instruments = of all or selections of the Nutcracker? I have a pianist coming in for Christmas Eve, and had the idea of us doing something together.   Thanks in advance,   Glenda Sutton            
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 09:11:36 -0800   Thank you people for what is to me only the beginning of the explanation. Things like " 1st break, 2nd break, etc. " ???? were mentioned. Thus I have to display my total ignorance , and hope someone can give me a little tutorial on the composition of mixtures? BTW this mixture was from a single organ, so I have to assume it is all one stop.   THNX   John V   > >>Time to turn to more knowledgable folks. We obtained what appears to >>be a four rank mixture. We'd most likely sell it. >>However, we need to do an inventory. >> >>At first glance it looked easy: Pipes were marked with pitch plus: >>mix 1, or mix 2 or mix 3 or mix 4. so we just laid out the matching >>pipes in order of pitch. >>BUT! there are a whole bunch of - and especially the smaller pipes >>- that did not just show the "mix1" "mix2" etc. They also had a >>second # stamped horizontally (perpendicular to the first number) >>stamped underneath. so it would read 3 2. or 1 3 or 3 3 etc. (imagine >>the 2nd # rotated 90 deg.). >> >>Not knowing much about mixtures, I am saying "HELP"! how do I sort >>those pipes and what does it mean? >> >>Thnx in advance! >> > >John V  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 10:49:59 EST   Dear John   Mixtures have breaks. The composition of modern mixtures may start at 2' or 1 1/3' pitch for a four rank mixture. Where the mixture breaks is determined by the builder to support the polyphony of that whole division of pipes.   Here's a hypothetical case: Notes 1-14 15, 19, 22, 26 15-25 12, 15, 19, 22 26-37 8ve, 12, 15, 19 38-50 5th, 8ve, 12, 15 51-61 1st, 8ve, 12, 15     1st=3D 8' C 5th=3D 5 1/3' G 8ve=3D 4' C 12th=3D 2 2/3' G 15th=3D 2' C 19th=3D 1 1/3' G 22nd=3D 1' C 26th=3D 2/3' G   You will notice that the 12th and 15th run nearly the full compass, in fact the 15th does. This is where the brilliance to the Diapason Chorus comes from, and reinforcement of power to gaps in the middle of the compass and at the bass end. Lower pitches are at the top to reinforce gaps that may reside there.   I hope this comes closer in explaining what a mixture is designed to do.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Max Reger and Christmas Carols From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 11:51:41 -0500   The Virgin's Slumber Song is originally for voice and piano.   In the Reger Gesamtausgabe it appears in Band 33 ("Sologesaenge mit = Klavier III") p. 141-142. It is op. 76 no. 52, but the caption reads "Ihrer = Hoheit Prinzessin Marie Elisabeth von Sachsen-Meiningen / ehrfurchtsvoll = zugeeignet / Neun Kinderlieder / Aus Christa's und Lotti's Kinderleben / Mariae Wiegenlied / (Martin Boelitz)." At the bottom of the page is "Copyright 1912 by Ed. Bote & G. Bock, Berlin." This publisher renewed the copyright in 1940, and it was assigned to Associated Music Publishers, New York.   It is a simple but ravishingly beautiful song for mezzo-soprano and piano. The accompaniment (marked pp-ppp throughout) would lend itself very well = to adaptation for the harp, and I have heard it this way, too. While I don't generally like to encourage vocal solos in the liturgy, I'd like to make = an exception here, to express and meditate on the important relationship between a Mother and a Child. After all, the whole cult of devotion to Our Lady depends on this relationship. This song is especially appealing, = either for Christmas Eve or Christmas Day, if you have an able, fresh-voiced high school girl among your singers, Typically, in my experience, by Christmas Day the choir (not to mention everyone else) is thoroughly exhausted after = a month of frantic activity culminating in midnight mass, and enjoying some well-earned relaxation at home. There must be a Christmas morning = service, and it must have music; but it is not well attended, and liable to prove = an anti-climactic, somnolent, even grim affair for anyone involved. The opportunity to sing this lullaby as a solo might suffice to attract an = eager young woman to enliven it with her contribution.   Paul Emmons    
(back) Subject: RE: Dupre From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 12:22:09 -0500   > I love the 1st and last Magnificat pieces and Antiphon III from a book = of > 15 pieces by Dupre. Can anyone recommend other works by Dupre that I > might tackle next?   First, the other 12 antiphons, of course. I think that they're all gems. But also:   79 chorals (published by H.W. Gray, or whatever Mills or entertainment conglomerate has absorbed them to date)-- very useful easy chorale = preludes, only a page or two in length, and fingered, based on chorales that Bach = has also set. They were intended for relative beginners at the organ, preparatory to studying Bach's Orgelbuchlein. If you have mastered any of the Antiphons, this book will be more like sight-reading material, but = IMHO every church organist should keep them handy. They are always on the = shelf next to the console at S. George's, ready to grab for impromptu Communion voluntaries.   Unfortunately, they do not appear in anything like liturgical-year order. Unless you are familiar with the chorale texts, you don't know what is appropriate when. Someone should prepare a seasonal or liturgical index = to them for insertion into the front of the volume. Unless someone here knows of this already having been done, I might volunteer to attempt this = project during Christmas break.   Another book of cantus-firmus-based pieces is Le Tombeau de Titelouze = (also H.W. Gray). These ca. 16 pieces, at least largely on Gregorian melodies, are more difficult. The best-known is a short but thrilling toccata on Placulus Servulis, for All Saints' Day.   You have probably heard of Cortege et Litanie, one of my favorite Dupre pieces. To my mind, it makes an ideal funeral postlude although, its title notwithstanding, I gather that it wasn't really composed for this purpose.   Always good to hear from another lover of Dupre's music.   Paul    
(back) Subject: Re: Carols from King's DVD From: "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 11:31:55 -0600   Hee hee, you're warm--there IS a reason why it's "Pains" instead of = "Panes."   Mandy <--getting very defensive about her spelling abilities ;o) --   On Tue, 27 Nov 2001 20:01:28 John L. Speller wrote:   >I think you probably mean "Panes of Glass" -- unless Sr. Wendy cut her >finger on a particularly jagged piece <g> > >John Speller      
(back) Subject: A Little Holiday Article From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 12:49:38 -0500 (EST)     Hi, all.   I thought I'd share with you my little holiday article for our parish newsletter MANIFEST. Every issue, I have an article called "From the Organ Bench." The last one I sent out got some nice comments, so I thought this one might be of interest too.   All best wishes for a happy holiday season!   jh church of the epiphany, nyc   ------------ FROM THE ORGAN BENCH       My favorite time is the fall, from the end of the summer season right through Christmas. After college, when I lived on the South Fork of Long Island, the first weeks after the summer season were just gorgeous: less and less traffic, empty beaches, and beautiful weather. Farm stands were full of zucchini and cauliflower, and church and community choirs were getting back together. Cider and caramel apples began to appear as leaves reluctantly changed color. (In that part of Long Island, this can take till late November.) Fireplaces crackled into life. Chi-chi restaurants closed or shortened their hours. Most of all, the holiday season was drawing near.   Hallowe'en, Thanksgiving, and Advent and Christmas are such a wonderful study in color and contrast. The orange and russet of autumn giving way to the purple and pink of Advent and then the reds and greens of Christmas. The rich iconography. The wonderful layers of history and tradition. One's whole life-clothing, diet, lifestyle-changes dramatically. There is a sense of new beginnings even as the old year is nearly spent.   The music of the holidays is one of the great joys of my life, especially the carols of Christmas. A "carol" is defined as a secular song about a sacred event, but for me all the music of the holidays is sacred. Christmas carols awaken some of the happiest, sweetest, oldest memories of my life: memories of youthful parents, living grandparents, still-familiar apartments one can never visit again, lights and gifts and magic and wonder. Christmas carols are truly sacred.   Here at Epiphany, we will have several chances to celebrate the music of Christmas. One of them will be on Sunday, December 16, at 2:30 pm. Dr. Justin Bischof, an award-winning and nationally respected master of the art of organ improvisation, will present a totally unique recital here. He will transform familiar songs of Christma-and Advent-into complete musical compositions on the spot. We will also have abundant chance to sing along! Come and enjoy music that will only be heard once, ever!   Then there is Christmas Eve. Our Choir will present a half hour of music starting at 10:30, and Eucharist will follow at 11. If you can come to the remaining rehearsals on Thursdays at 7:15, you can join us for this joyous occasion. What a blessing to sing in a choir in church on Christmas Eve!   May your Advent and Christmas be filled with light and music.   Jonathan --------------------------        
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 13:42:50 EST     --part1_11e.8251675.29368a2a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/28/01 9:13:23 AM Eastern Standard Time, jovanderlee@vassar.edu writes:     > BTW this mixture was from a single organ, so I have to assume it is > all one stop. >   That would be my guess. Now with married organs they begin to split and fragment into various other compositions!! ;-)   I, too, hope that the mixture thread will become very educational. I've never really understood the how's and why's, of the placement of breaks in =   actuality.... I do grasp the theory.   Advanced thanks to all who contribute.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_11e.8251675.29368a2a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/28/01 9:13:23 AM Eastern Standard Time, jovanderlee@vassar.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">BTW this mixture = was from a single organ, so I have to assume it is <BR>all one stop. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>That would be my guess. &nbsp;&nbsp;Now with married organs they begin = to split and fragment into various other compositions!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>I, too, hope that the mixture thread will become very educational. = &nbsp;I've never really understood the how's and why's, of the placement = of breaks in actuality.... &nbsp;I do grasp the theory. <BR> <BR>Advanced thanks to all who contribute. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_11e.8251675.29368a2a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 13:54:15 EST     --part1_119.86a7e75.29368cd7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/28/01 10:51:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:   Here's a hypothetical case: Notes 1-14 15, 19, 22, 26 15-25 12, 15, 19, 22 26-37 8ve, 12, 15, 19 38-50 5th, 8ve, 12, 15 51-61 1st, 8ve, 12, 15   You will notice that the 12th and 15th run nearly the full compass, in fact the 15th does. >>   Since the 12th and 15th run nearly the full compass, why are not in single =   ranks, and the breaks placed in the remaining two ranks?   Are 16 series ever included at the top of mixtures?       Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_119.86a7e75.29368cd7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/28/01 10:51:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR>Here's a hypothetical case: <BR>Notes <BR>1-14 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;15, 19, 22, 26 <BR>15-25 &nbsp;&nbsp;12, 15, 19, 22 <BR>26-37 &nbsp;&nbsp;8ve, 12, 15, 19 <BR>38-50 &nbsp;&nbsp;5th, 8ve, 12, 15 <BR>51-61 &nbsp;&nbsp;1st, 8ve, 12, 15 <BR> <BR>You will notice that the 12th and 15th run nearly the full compass, <BR>in fact the 15th does. &nbsp;&gt;&gt; <BR> <BR>Since the 12th and 15th run nearly the full compass, why are not in = single ranks, and the breaks placed in the remaining two ranks? <BR> <BR>Are 16 series ever included at the top of mixtures? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_119.86a7e75.29368cd7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: A Little Holiday Article From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 14:08:28 EST     --part1_a2.1d38fd7c.2936902c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   A very nice write-up, Jonathan. Your parish is very luck. I look = forward to your music postings.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_a2.1d38fd7c.2936902c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>A very nice write-up, = Jonathan. &nbsp;Your parish is very luck. &nbsp;&nbsp;I look forward to = your music postings. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a2.1d38fd7c.2936902c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 28 Nov 2001 11:10:47 -0800   On Wed, 28 November 2001, Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > <BR>Here's a hypothetical case: > <BR>Notes > <BR>1-14 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;15, 19, 22, 26 > <BR>15-25 &nbsp;&nbsp;12, 15, 19, 22 > <BR>26-37 &nbsp;&nbsp;8ve, 12, 15, 19 > <BR>38-50 &nbsp;&nbsp;5th, 8ve, 12, 15 > <BR>51-61 &nbsp;&nbsp;1st, 8ve, 12, 15   > <BR>Since the 12th and 15th run nearly the full compass, why are not in = single ranks, and the breaks placed in the remaining two ranks?   .... and why not make them individual stops -- i.e., a 12th, a 15th, and a = two-rank mixture?   Dick Meckstroth      
(back) Subject: RE: OFF-TOPIC: Advent and Christmas From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 15:32:22 -0500   >Christ CAME (past tense) at Christmas (well, actually, sometime in the middle of the summer, but no matter);   Is there actually evidence for this?   In any event, the choice of date for Christmas may not be chronologically accurate, but (according to a sermon heard a couple years ago) _pace_ the sneers of every scoffing atheist, it is more than merely arbitrary or expedient (i.e., as camouflage or competition vis-a-vis already-existing pagan solstice festivities). The ancient world considered it a mark of perfection to die on the date of one's conception. We know that Jesus was crucified around Passover, therefore early in springtime. We believe that He was perfect. It follows that He must have been conceived in the early spring as well, hence born in early winter.   >Christmas was a relatively minor festival in the Western Church until comparatively recently.   This is exactly what we would expect given the less Incarnational approach of the western church compared to the eastern. I don't know about you, = but the more I learn about eastern theological thought, the better I like it, and the more thankful I am to be in that part of the western church (Anglican) that has always been the most hospitable to eastern Orthodox ideas, including an emphasis on the Incarnation.   >as late as the early 1800s, Christmas Eve and/or Christmas Day = celebrations of the Eucharist were unknown in American Episcopal churches.   They were probably rare in the Church of England as well until about the same time, still laboring under Calvin's heavy hand. This suppression and suspicion were understandable to some extent, insofar as the popular celebration of Christmas in the Renaissance featured pranks, tomfoolery, = and sometimes vandalism, like our Halloween. There was a very practical reason why you might want to be good to bands of carolers who presented = themselves at your door. I recall an article about Dickens's _Christmas Carol_ = stating that it was rather uncommon to observe Christmas in England when it was written: this story had a great influence in encouraging it to the point that we take for granted now.   Of course, tractarianism-- specifically Puseyism-- was another decisive influence in support of Christmas observances, because it appreciated the pastoral importance of the dogma of the Incarnation (as well as the Atonement) to downtrodden people. A paper on this development, delivered = by Prof. Franklin of General Seminary at the AAM conference in Minnesota some years back, was I think the most thrilling and inspiring lecture I have = ever heard in my life. The Incarnation, specifically the dignity it gives to humanity and all of creation, underlies the entire raison d'etre of music = in the church. We should never seek to disparage it.   >Besides, if you wait till Twelfth Night to give gifts, you can hit all = the 50% off sales on Dec. 26th (grin).   I don't even need that encouragement. A tendency to procrastination = usually takes care of it for me. Admiration for Orthodox ways makes a virtue of not-quite-necessity :-)   Paul    
(back) Subject: George Wright From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 17:55:56 -0500   Two new theatre organ CDs from George Wright are now available at http://www.ohscatalog.org near the bottom of the opening page. The = original tapes of two of his great LPs, "The Wright Touch" and "A George Wright = Pipe Organ Concert" have been combined into one CD. The second new CD is "Anything Goes," a reissue of his 1987 digital recording. All 25 of = George Wright's CDs are on Wurlitzer pipe organs and are available at OHS.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture IDs - more dumber questions From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 19:41:33 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_005C_01C17844.AF524C00 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Many organbuilders think you should not use harmonics from the 16' =3D series, such as 5.1/3', in a mixture, because the resultants make things = =3D sound as if you have a 16' stop on, and this is felt to damage the =3D clarity. On the other hand Ernest M. Skinner thought you should use =3D 5.1/3' pitches at the top precisely because it adds depth and richness =3D in the treble. So it depends whom you agree with.   John Speller =3D20 Cremona502@cs.com Are 16 series ever included at the top of = mixtures?=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_005C_01C17844.AF524C00 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Dwindows-1252" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Many organbuilders think you should = not =3D use=3D20 harmonics from the 16' series, such as 5.1/3', in a mixture, =3D because&nbsp;the=3D20 resultants make things sound as if you have a 16' stop on, and this is =3D felt to=3D20 damage the clarity.&nbsp; On the other hand Ernest M. Skinner thought =3D you should=3D20 use 5.1/3' pitches at the top precisely because it adds depth and =3D richness in=3D20 the treble.&nbsp; So it depends whom you agree with.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>John Speller&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =3D </FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: = =3D 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com" =3D title=3D3DCremona502@cs.com>Cremona502@cs.com</A>=3D20 <FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>Are 16 series ever =3D included at the top=3D20 of mixtures? </FONT></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_005C_01C17844.AF524C00--    
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: Advent and Christmas From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 22:08:49 -0600       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > >Christ CAME (past tense) at Christmas (well, actually, sometime in the > middle of the summer, but no matter); > > Is there actually evidence for this?   According to what I learned years ago, the internal evidence of the = Gospels suggests a spring Nativity. In Palestine, the only time that the = shepherds kept watch over flocks in the fields is during the spring....   ns