PipeChat Digest #2523 - Thursday, November 29, 2001
 
Theodore Dubois Bio?
  by <Doubltrump@aol.com>
RE: mixtures
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com>
Crumar organ
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Mixture Composition
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Mixture Composition (part 2)
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Theodore Dubois Bio?
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Theodore Dubois Bio?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: mixtures
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re:Mixtures
  by "ken_earl01" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com>
Re: Re:Mixtures
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Severance Hall Skinner CD at OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Messiah & Organ Concerto NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Wow!  It's Christmas already!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Theodore Dubois Bio?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Theodore Dubois Bio? From: <Doubltrump@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 07:09:07 EST     --part1_cf.f6b4d64.29377f63_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear List,   I have decided to run with a concept of a featured composer each = month and use a different composition by them in each service that month. I = have had little success learning much about Theodore Dubois (1827 - 1924) and = ask for your assistance. Please reply privately to doubltrump@aol   Tom White Presbyterian Church, Bridgehampton, NY   --part1_cf.f6b4d64.29377f63_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Century Schoolbook" LANG=3D"0">Dear List, <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I have decided to run with a = concept of a featured composer each month and use a different composition = by them in each service that month. &nbsp;I have had little success = learning much about Theodore &nbsp;Dubois (1827 - 1924) and ask for your = assistance. &nbsp;Please reply privately <BR>to doubltrump@aol <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Tom White <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Presbyterian Church, = Bridgehampton, NY</FONT></HTML>   --part1_cf.f6b4d64.29377f63_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: mixtures From: "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 07:14:43 -0500   You can also write it like this. (Mixture 4-ranks on a 1 1/3' base). This explains the "real world" pitches involved for this example.   Lowest oct. 1 1/3 1 2/3 1/2 2e oct. 2 1 1/3 1 2/3 3e oct. 2 2/3 2 1 1/3 1 4e oct. 4 2 2/3 2 1 1/3 5e oct. 5 1/3 4 2 2/3 2  
(back) Subject: Crumar organ From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 05:10:50 -0800   I noticed in a report in a local paper mention of a "powerful Crumar organ" in one of our churches. Does anyone have details? It is, without doubt, electronic but I have never heard of this make.   Bob Elms.  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture Composition From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 08:31:53 EST   "Here's a hypothetical case: Notes 1-14 15, 19, 22, 26 15-25 12, 15, 19, 22 26-37 8ve, 12, 15, 19 38-50 5th, 8ve, 12, 15 51-61 1st, 8ve, 12, 15"   Most builders today would do anything to avoid that 5-1/3' contraquint running from soprano C-sharp through high C-sharp. It sounds very, very = odd in contrapuntal writing, especially when their are fugal passages with parallel sixths between voices. If this is the only Mixture on the Great division of the average organ in an American acoustic, the 15' harmonics, including the prime, should be omitted from a mixture.   See The Journal of American Organbuilding, Volume 14, Number 1.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture Composition (part 2) From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 08:46:25 EST   Then 16' Harmonics AS WELL as the 15' Harmonics.   Ligeti and Webern would be so proud...  
(back) Subject: Re: Theodore Dubois Bio? From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 10:33:13 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_01E1_01C178C1.3F900970 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Are you looking for biographical information, or information on =3D published works?   Malcolm Wechsler ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Doubltrump@aol.com=3D20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 Sent: Thursday, November 29, 2001 7:09 AM Subject: Theodore Dubois Bio?     Dear List,=3D20   I have decided to run with a concept of a featured composer each = =3D month and use a different composition by them in each service that =3D month. I have had little success learning much about Theodore Dubois =3D (1827 - 1924) and ask for your assistance. Please reply privately=3D20 to doubltrump@aol=3D20   Tom White=3D20 Presbyterian Church, Bridgehampton, NY=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_01E1_01C178C1.3F900970 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#c8e0d8> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Are you looking for biographical =3D information, or=3D20 information on published works?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Malcolm Wechsler</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3DDoubltrump@aol.com=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:Doubltrump@aol.com">Doubltrump@aol.com</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, November 29, = =3D 2001 7:09=3D20 AM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Theodore Dubois =3D Bio?</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0=3D20 face=3D3D"Century Schoolbook" size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF">Dear = List,=3D20 <BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I have decided to run with = =3D a=3D20 concept of a featured composer each month and use a different =3D composition by=3D20 them in each service that month. &nbsp;I have had little success =3D learning much=3D20 about Theodore &nbsp;Dubois (1827 - 1924) and ask for your assistance. = =3D   &nbsp;Please reply privately <BR>to <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:doubltrump@aol">doubltrump@aol</A>=3D20 <BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Tom White=3D20 <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Presbyterian Church, =3D Bridgehampton,=3D20 NY</FONT> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_01E1_01C178C1.3F900970--      
(back) Subject: Re: Theodore Dubois Bio? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 10:43:00 EST     --part1_16a.4be064b.2937b184_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Tom, I don't know much about Dubois, personally, but I do enjoy his music. The =   Twelve Pieces are very nice, the first of which is much like an = improvisation that sort of comes out of nowhere, builds, ebbs and flows, and then fades away. Of course, the Ten Pieces can't be beat, especially the elevation.   I hope you'll share your music with us.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_16a.4be064b.2937b184_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Tom, <BR>I don't know much about Dubois, personally, but I do enjoy his music. = &nbsp;The Twelve Pieces are very nice, the first of which is much like an = improvisation that sort of comes out of nowhere, builds, ebbs and flows, = and then fades away. &nbsp;&nbsp;Of course, the Ten Pieces can't be beat, = especially the elevation. <BR> <BR>I hope you'll share your music with us. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_16a.4be064b.2937b184_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: mixtures From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 10:44:47 EST     --part1_121.7ee9cc8.2937b1ef_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/29/01 7:21:54 AM Eastern Standard Time, wayne@eminent-usa.com writes:     > You can also write it like this. (Mixture 4-ranks on a 1 1/3' base). > This explains the "real world" pitches involved for this example. >   How dare you speak in understandable language.... !! ;-)   (thanky)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_121.7ee9cc8.2937b1ef_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/29/01 7:21:54 AM Eastern Standard Time, wayne@eminent-usa.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">You can also write = it like this. (Mixture 4-ranks on a 1 1/3' base). <BR>This explains the "real world" pitches involved for this example. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>How dare you speak in understandable language.... &nbsp;!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>(thanky) <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_121.7ee9cc8.2937b1ef_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 11:00:04 -0800     Ok now I'm gonna sound real stupid: All the discourse so far is making me feel like Alice in Mixtureland. Not that I don't appreciate it! But you may assume that I know nothing about mixtures except that they enhance the ensemble. That's where my knowledge stops. Everything I've read so far assumes that the other parties know *something* about them. Me? I feel like Alice! Can some one either offer me a primer on mixtures (4 rank in my case) or point me to something that equates" "Mixtures For Dummies"?   As always, trying to learn (and hoping to make sense out of that pile of = pipes)   Dumbfoundedly,   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 12:06:20 EST   Dear John(Alice)   Lay out your pipes in four rows on the floor and use the indicators on the pipes 1/1 2/1 3/1 4/1 line these up first. 1/1 being the longest, 2/1 the second row, 3/1 third row, and 4/1 fourth row. Keep going until you reach the break large to smaller, then 1/2 first row next to 1/1, 2/2 next to 2/1 and 3/2 next to 3/1 and 4/2 next to 4/1. Keep going with sorting until you reach the next break. then 1/3 next to 1/2, 2/3 next to 2/2, 3/3 next to 3/2 and 4/3 next to 4/2. If there is a fourth break, 1/4 next to 1/3, 2/4 next to 2/3, 3/4 next to3/3 and 4/4 next to = 4/3.   The first number in each fraction is the row number, the second number is the number of the pipe group. When you finish you should have before you four rows of pipes in order, and each row should have four groups of pipes larger to smaller.   (Row 1) 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4 (Row 2) 2/1, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4 (Row 3) 3/1, 3/2, 3/3, 3/4 (Row 4) 4/1, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4   The arrangement will look like four rows saw tooth shaped. I do hope this explains things a bit more plain. There should be 244pipes in the correct order to place on the chest. Lining these pipes up in the correct order is only the first of your challenges. Now you've got to tune them. Make sure the tempered tuning rank is dead on equal temperment usually a 4' principal. Put in one row at a time of your mixture and tune them dead on. Handle the mixture pipes with thick cloth gloves so as not to transmit heat of your hand to them. Let each row stand for a few minutes to equalize to room temp and tune them. You may need to touch up some of them. This can take several hours to do the first time. The tuning tool needs to be thin enough not to jar tuners on adjacent pipes. Have Fun!   Don't open any attachments to E-mail even this one!   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re:Mixtures From: "ken_earl01" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 21:14:11 -0000   Hi all   Bruce C and John V has asked about Mixtures, and i hope I can add a little clarity, if not brilliance, to the topic!!   The history behind the multirank mixture lies in the design of the organ even before the German 'werkprinzip' concept was realised.   The original 'principals', because of the scaling methods used, tended to = be reasonably bright in the bass, and more much more flute toned as one progressed towards the trebles. In other words, the 'scale' of the rank = did not halve soon enough.   In order to get 'brilliance' and reinforce the volume of the weak trebles, multi rank mixtures were concieved, often of a what would nowadays be thought of as an eccentric make up. For example, one such is quoted as being of 5 ranks in the bass, and 10 ranks on the treble, starting with :-   CC =3D 15th, 19th, 22nd, 26th, 29th,   until in the top octave on had - 1, 1, 1, 1, (Unison, unison, unison = unison) 5th, 5th, 5th, 5th, 8th, 8th.   But - in the concept of the original tone, this would have worked.   Once the 'werkprinzip' was adopted, it was common to have the 'Brustwerk' manual's chorus based upon a 16' Principal (with a 32' Sub Principal) , = the Hauptwerk manual's chorus based upon an 8' Principal (with a 16' sub), the Oberwerk manual based upon a 4' Principal (with an 8' Sub), and the Ruck-positif or Positif based upon a 2' Principal (with a 4' Sub).   The compostion of the mixtures which then reinforce the harmonic series (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and so on) are then based upon the pitch of the = 'Principal' stop of the manual.   So - if the Brustwerk uses a 16' prinicpal, then we might see a 4 rank mixture starting as a 12, 15, 19, 22, and breaking back to a sub quint, 1, 5, 8 in the top end.   The same fourniture on the Hauptwerk would be a 19, 22, 26, 29, ( one = octave higher), the Oberwerk's version would be a 26, 29, 33, 36, and the = positif, with its 2' principal, and 1' Octavek, having a little Scharff sitting at 33, 36, 40, 43 at CC.   In the latter case, the breaks would have to occur within the first 18 notes, and then every 6 notes or so, to keep the highest pitched pipe = within a tunable length / pitch.   On this point, whilst most builders make the Tierce (1,3/5) right up to = the top note of a 61 note keyboard, it is usual to make the highest note of = the organ with a 61 note keyboard as the top note of the 2' or 15th, as this = is the highest note / shortest pipe that it is practical to tune, even with cone tuning.   In modern instruments, where mixtures are used to reinforce other = harmonics (b21st, 17th, etc) the breaks will depend upon the pitch of the reeds that they are corroborating into the fluework, otherwise, the compostion of 'traditional' mixtures and the positioning of their breaks is fairly standard practice amongst all of the organ builders, based upon the experimental work carried out in the 19th century by the likes of Walcker = in Germany, Cavaille-Coll in France, and Willis in England.   Have I shed light??   KE        
(back) Subject: Re: Re:Mixtures From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2001 11:53:50 +1300   Get off the grass! A 16ft-Principal as the basis of a Brustwerk? That = little division right above your head where you can tune the fractional-length reeds easily? If the Hauptwerk was 16ft, the Ruckpositiv would be 8ft and the Brustwerk 4ft. If there was an Oberwerk, it is likely that would be 8ft-based and the Ruck at 4ft and the Brust at 2ft.   But remember the words of Debussy, that books about theory are written = after a style has gone out of fashion, by people who can't compose themselves. = Or was it Mozart? No matter. Debussy did say that he had no theory of composition whatever, nor of harmony, but that here merely wrote down = sounds that appealed to him. The parable is this: that you don't have to follow any 16-8-4-2 system of manual bases (not referring to basses) with a 32ft Pedal, or somesuch, but do what you like to create a musical instrument. Wasn't it Schnitger = himself who on one organ had the 2 2/3 Twelfth as the lowest-pitched Principal on the Great, and that was a strong rank to create an 8ft resultant with the = 8 and 4ft flutes? This was because he had very little height to work in. And = a wonderful organ - I've got it on a recording. Ross (in NZ) -----Original Message----- From: ken_earl01 <ken_earl01@hotmail.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, November 30, 2001 10:14 AM Subject: Re:Mixtures     >Hi all > >Bruce C and John V has asked about Mixtures, and i hope I can add a = little >clarity, if not brilliance, to the topic!! > >The history behind the multirank mixture lies in the design of the organ >even before the German 'werkprinzip' concept was realised. > >The original 'principals', because of the scaling methods used, tended to be >reasonably bright in the bass, and more much more flute toned as one >progressed towards the trebles. In other words, the 'scale' of the rank did >not halve soon enough. > >In order to get 'brilliance' and reinforce the volume of the weak = trebles, >multi rank mixtures were concieved, often of a what would nowadays be >thought of as an eccentric make up. For example, one such is quoted as >being of 5 ranks in the bass, and 10 ranks on the treble, starting with = :- > >CC =3D 15th, 19th, 22nd, 26th, 29th, > >until in the top octave on had - 1, 1, 1, 1, (Unison, unison, unison unison) >5th, 5th, 5th, 5th, 8th, 8th. > >But - in the concept of the original tone, this would have worked. > >Once the 'werkprinzip' was adopted, it was common to have the 'Brustwerk' >manual's chorus based upon a 16' Principal (with a 32' Sub Principal) , the >Hauptwerk manual's chorus based upon an 8' Principal (with a 16' sub), = the >Oberwerk manual based upon a 4' Principal (with an 8' Sub), and the >Ruck-positif or Positif based upon a 2' Principal (with a 4' Sub). > >The compostion of the mixtures which then reinforce the harmonic series >(1st, 2nd, 3rd, and so on) are then based upon the pitch of the = 'Principal' >stop of the manual. > >So - if the Brustwerk uses a 16' prinicpal, then we might see a 4 rank >mixture starting as a 12, 15, 19, 22, and breaking back to a sub quint, = 1, >5, 8 in the top end. > >The same fourniture on the Hauptwerk would be a 19, 22, 26, 29, ( one octave >higher), the Oberwerk's version would be a 26, 29, 33, 36, and the = positif, >with its 2' principal, and 1' Octavek, having a little Scharff sitting at >33, 36, 40, 43 at CC. > >In the latter case, the breaks would have to occur within the first 18 >notes, and then every 6 notes or so, to keep the highest pitched pipe within >a tunable length / pitch. > >On this point, whilst most builders make the Tierce (1,3/5) right up to = the >top note of a 61 note keyboard, it is usual to make the highest note of = the >organ with a 61 note keyboard as the top note of the 2' or 15th, as this = is >the highest note / shortest pipe that it is practical to tune, even with >cone tuning. > >In modern instruments, where mixtures are used to reinforce other = harmonics >(b21st, 17th, etc) the breaks will depend upon the pitch of the reeds = that >they are corroborating into the fluework, otherwise, the compostion of >'traditional' mixtures and the positioning of their breaks is fairly >standard practice amongst all of the organ builders, based upon the >experimental work carried out in the 19th century by the likes of Walcker in >Germany, Cavaille-Coll in France, and Willis in England. > >Have I shed light?? > >KE > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2001 12:13:55 +1300   Did you get my email the other day when I asked if it might be possible to buy your mixture from you? This hard-up retired Anglican vicar in New Zealand hath a mighty need of a Mixture stop to complete his pipe collection, to be an organ next year. Ross Wards -----Original Message----- From: John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, November 30, 2001 5:01 AM Subject: Re: mixtures and Alice in Mixtureland     > >Ok now I'm gonna sound real stupid: >All the discourse so far is making me feel like Alice in Mixtureland. >Not that I don't appreciate it! >But you may assume that I know nothing about mixtures except that >they enhance the ensemble. That's where my knowledge stops. >Everything I've read so far assumes that the other parties know >*something* about them. Me? I feel like Alice! Can some one either >offer me a primer on mixtures (4 rank in my case) or point me to >something that equates" "Mixtures For Dummies"? > >As always, trying to learn (and hoping to make sense out of that pile of pipes) > >Dumbfoundedly, > >John V > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Severance Hall Skinner CD at OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 18:51:13 -0500   Dear List:   In response to many requests, the OHS Catalog at http://www.ohscatalog.org now has available the brand new CD of Todd Wilson playing Christmas music = on the 1929 (installed '31) E. M. Skinner 4-95 at Severance Hall, Cleveland, Ohio. As most of the organ world knows, this organ received a widely heralded and very well received restoration recently that involved relocating it from the fly space 41 feet above the stage of the hall to = new space created for it onstage. Until the restoration, the organ had been essentially silent for about 30 years.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Messiah & Organ Concerto NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 19:10:08 EST   THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH in the City of New York presents   Georg Friedrich Handel (1685-1759):   "MESSIAH," an Oratorio (Christmas portions) Ellen Goff Entriken, soprano Cheryl Zilinyi, mezzo-soprano Daniel Cucura, tenor Andrew Martens, bass   The First Presbyterian Church Orchestra William F. Entriken, DMA, Conductor and Director of Music Dr. Walter Hilse, FAGO, continuo organist   Concerto for Organ with Orchestra in B-flat, Opus 7, Number 3   William F. Entriken, DMA, Organ soloist The First Presbyterian Church Orchestra   Sunday Afternoon, 2 December, 2001, at 4:00 O'Clock The First Presbyterian Church in the City of New York Fifth Avenue from Eleventh to Twelfth Streets 4,5,6,L,N,R,Q and W trains to Union Square; 1,2, and 3 trains to 14th = Street   Fellowship and refreshments follow; please say "hello" if you join us.  
(back) Subject: Wow! It's Christmas already! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 19:41:13 -0600   It may only be Advent at church, but it's Christmas at the Sutton = household. I had been disgruntled because I hadn't received any Christmas cards, even though it's not even December 1. And I have despaired of ever receiving = my order from the Royal School of Church Music(ians) from over two months = ago.   Today I bought Rick an early birthday present, a toolbox with tools that = he had admired. I also bought the paper, bow and card, then found out I couldn't even lift the box. Because I couldn't carry it, I decided I = would never get it wrapped, much less out of the CRV. So I told him about it so he could unload it himself.   Tonight I got home and he was in the garage putting the pieces parts of = the toolbox together. There on the kitchen counter was the mail - the latest issue of TAO, my first Christmas card of the season from Stan Lowkis (thanks, Stan - it is lovely), AND my very own autographed copy of the directory of composers for organ by Dr. Henderson! Nifty-neato. It took 15 minutes to unwrap the thing, but it's so great, with even pictures and a list of BWV numbers! I may never get = to ask another stupid question again. What more could anyone want?   Glenda Sutton (with kitty Zack on her lap, who wants to write Santa to ask for his very own laptop)                  
(back) Subject: Re: Theodore Dubois Bio? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 20:06:12 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_004F_01C17911.4AE96820 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   One thing I do remember about him is that he was organist of the Church = =3D of the Madeleine in Paris. One of the pieces by Dubois that is best =3D known is his Marche des Rois Mages, which includes a held note high up =3D on the Choir Organ most of the way through. On one occasion Dubois =3D himself was playing this piece and the organbuilder Cavaill=3DE9-Coll was = =3D in the congregation. Hearing the long note, Cavaill=3DE9-Coll thought it = =3D was a cipher, rushed up and began to pull pipes, much to the outrage of = =3D the performer! One of my favorite pieces by Dubois -- and almost =3D unknown today -- is his Grand Choeur in D major (not to be confused with = =3D the better-known Grand Choeur in G major).=3D20   John=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_004F_01C17911.4AE96820 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Dwindows-1252" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>One thing I do remember about him is = =3D that he was=3D20 organist of the Church of the Madeleine in Paris.&nbsp; One of the =3D pieces by=3D20 Dubois that is best known is his Marche des Rois Mages, which includes a = =3D held=3D20 note high up on the Choir Organ most of the way through.&nbsp; On one =3D occasion=3D20 Dubois himself was playing this piece and the organbuilder =3D Cavaill=3DE9-Coll was in=3D20 the congregation.&nbsp; Hearing the long note, Cavaill=3DE9-Coll thought = =3D it was a=3D20 cipher, rushed up and began to pull pipes, much to the outrage of the=3D20 performer!&nbsp; One of my favorite pieces by Dubois -- and almost =3D unknown today=3D20 -- is his Grand Choeur in D major (not to be confused with the =3D better-known=3D20 Grand Choeur in G major). </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>John </FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_004F_01C17911.4AE96820--