PipeChat Digest #2414 - Thursday, October 4, 2001
 
Re: THE "NON-PROFIT" ISSUE
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Grace Cathedral - San Francisco
  by <PHarri5833@aol.com>
The Oberlin Fisk
  by <Mark85inCT@aol.com>
Re: The Oberlin Fisk - question
  by "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de>
Re: The Oberlin Fisk - question
  by <Mark85inCT@aol.com>
Bach Cantatas on CD-ROM, also Keyboard Wks
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Anyone hear the Oberlin Fisk?
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Cavaille-Coll, Fisk
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Grace Cathedral - San Francisco
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: AGO certificates
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Wurlitzer electronic for home available
  by "Patricia and Bill Scoffield" <grampa@eagle.ca>
AGO, ametuers, Credentials, Etc.
  by "Larry" <Larrytow@webtv.net>
Re: AGO, ametuers, Credentials, Etc.
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: THE "NON-PROFIT" ISSUE From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 03 Oct 2001 12:38:10 -0700       Randy Terry wrote:   > I only read Bud's latest "to AGO or not to AGO." Bud, I suggest you = join, if you have not already > done so, the Association of Anglican Musicians. The higher professional = emphasis and "invitation > only" attitude seem to be more in keeping with what you describe. (Skip = to last paragraph to read > about *topic!*)   Ah, but there's an issue there, I believe ... I have been told in the past = that musicians who work in "continuing" churches, while they may JOIN, are DEFINITELY *not* welcome = in AAM. And indeed it WOULD be strange to go to conventions and be expected to participate in = liturgies that (1) I left ECUSA to get AWAY from (grin), and (2) about which there is at least SOME question = of canonical validity. Now, I hasten to add that (2), at least in MY view, is because of ECUSA bishops = remaining in communion with certain bishops who deny belief in the doctrines of the Trinity and the = physical Resurrection of Our Lord, and NOT because ECUSA has women priests and bishops. It may shock = some to discover that I don't care a FIG one way or the other about THAT. However, I DO care deeply = about doctrinal ORTHODOXY.   > My attitude is that there is NOTHING wrong with the AGO as it is set up. = For centuries membership > in "guilds" has not been based on education but training and experience.   Then let's revive the rigorous apprenticeship program which still obtains = in some places in the U.K., and which produces MOST of the outstanding cathedral and collegiate = organists, who come up through the ranks from boy chorister.   > What is wrong with the > AGO is the additudes of certain of its membership and detractors alike. = As to what level of > training one should exhibit to bridge the gap I won't even think about = going there. > > Look at it this way: If the requirement for membership in the AGO was = that we all hold the FAGO > diploma then the organization would not exist in anything near the form = it does today and it > certainly would not be able to afford a publication as nice as TAO.   That's irrelevant. I can find out all I need to find out about the organ, = harpsichord and carillon world from The Diapason; what I DON'T need to know is who served tea at = the East Tujunga Flats chapter meeting.   > Additionally, those who have > most to gain from membership in the AGO are certainly the part-timers, = regardless of education. I > have been concerned for years that no matter how much effort the = chapters I am involved with try > to make their programs accessible to the "basic" church musician, these = very people we keep trying > to attract don't get reached. I can only conclude that they are happy = where they are and don't > care. I don't even think a blanket "snob" excuse applies as not all = AGO'er are snobs and even if > you think that, until you find that to be true for yourself you should = not accept it as fact!   I think you're making my point, Randy. It is very difficult (read = "impossible) for ONE organization to function both as an educational organization for those who need THAT *and* = a professional guild/union/whatever for those who need THAT.   > Personally, I fall in-between I certainly could not pass the FAGO or = AAGO without much study > especially for some of the paperwork parts. Too much trouble, on the = other hand I'm not sure you > gain anything by holding a service playing note, and the CAGO is a = stepping stone to the main > diplomas mentioned above. For me, why bother doing the service playing = test, I already get jobs > quite above that level, and I am too lazy as well as too busy to take = the time to attempt the > others.   I'm sorry to say that in the "real world", all of the above and $1.50 will = get you on Metro Transit, and not much else. I hold a musty-dusty BMus in Organ Performance from a = venerable conservatory of music, and that's ALL. What has ALWAYS gotten me jobs is who I've STUDIED = with, the accumulated list of choral works I've performed over the years, and some excellent = references ... not so much from teachers, although I have those, as from the CHURCHES I've worked in.   My job interview at St. Matthew's lasted all of two minutes:   "Do you know how to do Holy Week?   "Yes."   "You're hired."   "Don't you want to hear me play the organ?"   "If you can do Holy Week, you can play the organ."   End of interview. A handshake, and I was hired.   > I guess I do agree with you regarding who the AGO is serving. In my = experience it is not reaching > those it attempts to serve, and in my chapter we take that approach in = our planning and those of > us who attend meetings are bored. The annual Bar-B-Que in September will = have 50 people in > attendance. It is FUN, and the host has a 50 rank classical all pipe = organ. People enjoy playing > members recitals at Stanford or at the Littlefield residence, but = monthly meetings are poorly > attended and the only public events which have a significant audience = are those at Stanford and it > is the allure of the beautiful chapel and campus, plus a constant supply = of tourists that give > that a shot in the arm.   Agreed. The Orange County Chapter is fairly active, and they do a fine job = with their Pipe Organ Encounter, but the rest of the programs (for the most part) are geared to = the non-professional.   > To actually address the topic. After the bombing, my company laid off = several employees, including > me. I have worked in California for almost 3 years. When I called about = unemployment, my name > didn't show up, upon questioning, I was asked "have you worked for = non-profits?" It just so > happens that at least here if you work for a non-profit they are not = required to pay into the > unemployment system and it is not always made clear to employees. I = began working in a > "for-profit" at such a point that I would be eligable for the full = unemployment amount in > Novemebr, leaving me without a full time income for over a month. I was = hired yesterday for a new > job (secular) actually making more money than my last secular job, which = makes this less of an > issue for me. But I will NEVER again consider working full-time for a = non profit organization in > California, and I think this is something that really should be = addressed across the board > regardless of whether you work for the church or some other non profit = agency. It seems cruel for > someone to spend a career working to help others and then be left out in = the cold when they > themselves need help! > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Randy Terry > Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster > The Episcopal Church of St. Peter > Redwood City, California > www.stpetersrwc.org >   Just so ... and, it should be noted, neither are you eligible for State = DISABILITY benefits if you work for a non-profit in California. Churches may CHOOSE to pay into = disability and unemployment; few do. THIS is the kind of thing, in my opinion, that an organists' guild = should be addressing. I haven't heard anything about Guild health a retirement benefits in awhile, so I = don't know precisely what the state of all that is.   I paid my AGO dues this year; I suppose TAO will start coming eventually; = but that's a pretty steep price for a magazine and not much else.   Cheers,   Bud-by-the-Beach    
(back) Subject: RE: Grace Cathedral - San Francisco From: <PHarri5833@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2001 15:58:38 EDT     --part1_6a.145c851e.28ecc7ee_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 03/10/01 20:39:14 GMT Daylight Time, = pipechat@pipechat.org writes: > has a new addition. It is an unenclosed Tuba Magna   I certainly hope no-one would ever think of enclosing dear Mr Gluck!   Kind regards from a contended amateur musician Peter M Harrison BSc, ATCL, MIBS etc...! Emmanuel Church, Holcombe Ramsbottom, Lancashire & P H Music tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 web www.phmusic.co.uk   --part1_6a.145c851e.28ecc7ee_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 03/10/01 20:39:14 GMT Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: <BR>.......<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> has a new = addition. &nbsp;It is an unenclosed Tuba Magna</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I certainly hope no-one would ever think of enclosing dear Mr Gluck! <BR> <BR>Kind regards from a contended amateur musician <BR>Peter M Harrison BSc, ATCL, MIBS etc...! <BR>Emmanuel Church, Holcombe <BR>Ramsbottom, Lancashire <BR>&amp; P H Music <BR>tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 <BR>fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 <BR>web www.phmusic.co.uk</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6a.145c851e.28ecc7ee_boundary--  
(back) Subject: The Oberlin Fisk From: <Mark85inCT@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2001 17:00:32 EDT     --part1_f4.10419630.28ecd670_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Wayne and list,   I attended the festivities inaugurating the new Fisk at Oberlin this past weekend. The organ is pretty terrific and a beautiful vehicle for French literature. While splendid with the Oberlin Orchestra Friday evening, the organ really came into its own Saturday night in the solo recital. Incidentally, both events were filled to capacity! David Boe and Haskell Thomson (Professors of Organ at the Conservatory) were the organists both evenings. Finney Chapel is a spacious room seating about 1300 people and, thanks to some acoustical work, sounds pretty good though it could stand = to be a bit more live. Saturday's performances really showed off the instrument's true continental character. The solo voices are lovely = (soaring harmonic flutes, luscious strings, truly gorgeous English Horn and = Clarinet stops); foundation stops broad, warm, and colorful; and chorus reeds fiery =   and brilliant without obliterating the richness of the flue choruses ... = it was like listening to a stunning Cavaille-Coll ... one that was surgically = in tune! The pedal organ boasts three substantial 32' stops ... PLENTY of = very solid support. And the two enclosed divisions are impressively effective = ... particularly the Recit. Evidently, much of the exceptional color of the instrument is compromised by the sonic resources of a full symphony = orchestra.   This certainly isn't much of an "in depth review" of the organ, but gives = a very brief accounting of my impression. Perhaps more will follow. Were any =   other list members there?   Mark Scholtz (Oberlin class of 1985 ... Haskell Thomson's studio)   --part1_f4.10419630.28ecd670_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Dear Wayne and list, <BR> <BR>I attended the festivities inaugurating the new Fisk at Oberlin this = past weekend. The organ is pretty terrific and a beautiful vehicle for = French literature. While splendid with the Oberlin Orchestra Friday = evening, the organ really came into its own Saturday night in the solo = recital. Incidentally, both events were filled to capacity! David Boe and = Haskell Thomson (Professors of Organ at the Conservatory) were the = organists both evenings. Finney Chapel is a spacious room seating about = 1300 people and, thanks to some acoustical work, sounds pretty good though = it could stand to be a bit more live. Saturday's performances really = showed off the instrument's true continental character. The solo voices = are lovely (soaring harmonic flutes, luscious strings, truly gorgeous = English Horn and Clarinet stops); foundation stops broad, warm, and = colorful; and chorus reeds fiery and brilliant without obliterating the = richness of the flue choruses ... it was like listening to a stunning = Cavaille <BR> <BR>This certainly isn't much of an "in depth review" of the organ, but = gives a very brief accounting of my impression. Perhaps more will follow. = Were any other list members there? <BR> <BR>Mark Scholtz <BR>(Oberlin class of 1985 ... Haskell Thomson's studio)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f4.10419630.28ecd670_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: The Oberlin Fisk - question From: "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 00:58:48 +0200   Dear Mark,   Would you please explain what you mean by the following:     "it was like listening to a stunning Cavaille-Coll ... one that was surgically in tune!" , and   "Evidently, much of the exceptional color of the instrument is compromised by the sonic resources of a full symphony orchestra." - does this mean it is not successful as a concert hall organ?     Thanks, Sam Westbrook    
(back) Subject: Re: The Oberlin Fisk - question From: <Mark85inCT@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2001 19:37:02 EDT     --part1_2b.1c33b082.28ecfb1e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Sam,   "It was like listening to a stunning Cavaille-Coll ... one that was =   surgically in tune!"   It seems to me, after listening to many recordings of famous organs of Cavaille-Coll (and other French builders), that they aren't always in the absolute finest of tune. The effect is stunning, but there are moments = when there's something a bit pungent in the mix. At Oberlin, the Fisk was beautifully and precisely tuned ... as it ought to have been for its = premiere.   "Evidently, much of the exceptional color of the instrument is compromised by the sonic resources of a full symphony orchestra." - does this mean it is not successful as a concert hall organ?   Not at all! The organ is incredibly successful and equal to what an = orchestra can muster. It is the "color" of the registers that is somewhat masked by = the orchestra. The Fisk is most certainly audible over and equal to the sound = of full orchestra, but the bite and "clang" of the reeds and choruses is somewhat more tame. It is a very exciting concert hall instrument ... as = was evident on that mighty C Major chord in Saint-Saens' third and throughout Jongen's "Symphonie Concertante."   Mark     --part1_2b.1c33b082.28ecfb1e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Sam, <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;"It was like listening to a stunning Cavaille-Coll ... = one that was &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;surgically in tune!" <BR> <BR>It seems to me, after listening to many recordings of famous organs of = Cavaille-Coll (and other French builders), that they aren't always in the = absolute finest of tune. The effect is stunning, but there are moments = when there's something a bit pungent in the mix. At Oberlin, the Fisk was = beautifully and precisely tuned ... as it ought to have been for its = premiere. <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;"Evidently, much of the exceptional color of the <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;instrument is compromised by the sonic resources of = a full symphony <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;orchestra." - does this mean it is not successful = as a concert hall <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;organ? <BR> <BR>Not at all! The organ is incredibly successful and equal to what an = orchestra can muster. It is the "color" of the registers that is somewhat = masked by the orchestra. The Fisk is most certainly audible over and equal = to the sound of full orchestra, but the bite and "clang" of the reeds and = choruses is somewhat more tame. It is a very exciting concert hall = instrument ... as was evident on that mighty C Major chord in Saint-Saens' = third and throughout Jongen's "Symphonie Concertante." <BR> <BR>Mark <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_2b.1c33b082.28ecfb1e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Bach Cantatas on CD-ROM, also Keyboard Wks From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Wed, 03 Oct 2001 19:58:48 -0400   All 199 of J. S. Bach's church cantatas, BWV 1 through BWV 199, are now available as piano/vocal scores on CD-ROM for $21 from http://www.ohscatalog.org   From a computer with a CD drive, one may view these scores on screen and/or print one page, several pages, or all of them on whatever sort of printer is attached to the computer.   On another CD-ROM, all of Bach's keyboard works are available for $13. This CD-ROM contains the 371 chorals, the Well-Tempered Clavier, the 2-part and 3-part Inventions, the Anna Magdalena Notebook and the book for W. F. Bach, the French and English Suites, the Goldberg Variations, 40+ concert works, etc.   These are both from the same source, CD Sheet Music, that brought us the complete Bach Organ Works on CD-ROM and the CD-ROM of Baroque Organ Music, comprising all the works of Sweelinck, Buxtehude, Froberger, etc.   CD Sheet Music advises that the secular cantatas and other choral works of Bach will appear on CD-ROM to be issued in the future.   Bill  
(back) Subject: Anyone hear the Oberlin Fisk? From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2001 20:25:34 EDT   In a message dated 01-10-03 13:04:33 EDT, you write:   > > I was curious if any list members made it to Obelin to hear the Fisk at > Finney Chapel? > Wayne   I am also curious. I was hoping to go back and see the other organ alums = and hear the new Fisk as well as the Flentrop and Brombaugh, neither of which = i have heard; alas, it was not to be, as i am in the middle of moving. Merry  
(back) Subject: Cavaille-Coll, Fisk From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 03 Oct 2001 17:02:09 -0700   A Cavaille-Coll in TUNE? Sacre bleu! The French only tune their mixtures once every thirty years or so, when the organs are REBUILT (grin).   One Paris church (I forget which one at the moment ... St. Eustache?) had its electric blower sitting OUTSIDE in a little shed ... THAT must have made for some interesting tuning problems.   OTOH, I'm not sure "surgically" in tune is altogether desirable either .... like the strings of an orchestra, part of the "life" of a pipe organ's sound is that it ISN'T ever totally locked-down in tune ... electronic substitutes (except for tonewheeler Hammonds, which have their own unique tuning) have been trying to mimic THAT since the beginning ... our (temporary) '70s Allen has a couple of tabs that purport to do just that ... "Random Motion" and something else ... I forget the name right now ... I leave 'em both off ... they sound pretty nasty ... more like electronic distortion than anything.   At any rate ... so nobody in the back of the Oberlin orchestra was waving a white flag (unlike Dallas)? (grin)   Cheers,   Bud-by-the-Beach Oberlin x1966 (left in '65, finished at Cincinnati in '71)    
(back) Subject: Re: Grace Cathedral - San Francisco From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 04 Oct 2001 10:42:48 +0800   If the Tuba Major was the solo stop used in the Postlude lastSunday it seemed to be surprisingly thin and barely coverd the rest of the organ. The Tuba Magna in St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne, is hair raising and tops full organ quite easily. Bob Elms.   > The wonderful G Donald Harrison Aeolian-Skinner Organ in Grace Cathedral = has a new addition. It is an unenclosed Tuba Magna > >    
(back) Subject: Re: AGO certificates From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2001 23:48:36 EDT     --part1_f5.103a8239.28ed3614_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In 1997, I was awarded the AAGO. I worked hard for it, even though I already have a masters degree from a highly respected music school at a = major university. And, I am proud of my AAGO.   For the moment, I have decided against pursuing a doctorate (for various reasons, 2 of which are time and money). And for the moment, I do not = really think I need a doctorate anyway (even though it has been a life-long goal = to earn one).   The exams for the AGO certificates are NOT easy. In 1997, I was only 1 of = 7 people in the entire USA that passed the AAGO exams (I do not know how = many took them). I came away from the exams totally "wiped out", exhausted, drained, obliterated.   Yes, I'm proud of my AAGO.   Neil B.             --part1_f5.103a8239.28ed3614_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In 1997, I was awarded the AAGO. &nbsp;&nbsp;I worked hard for = it, even though I already have a masters degree from a highly respected = music school at a major university. &nbsp;And, I am proud of my AAGO. = &nbsp; <BR> <BR>For the moment, I have decided against pursuing a doctorate (for = various reasons, 2 of which are time and money). &nbsp;And for the moment, = I do not really think I need a doctorate anyway (even though it has been a = life-long goal to earn one). &nbsp; <BR> <BR>The exams for the AGO certificates are NOT easy. &nbsp;In 1997, I was = only 1 of 7 people in the entire USA that passed the AAGO exams (I do not = know how many took them). &nbsp;&nbsp;I came away from the exams totally = "wiped out", exhausted, drained, obliterated. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Yes, I'm proud of my AAGO. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Neil B. <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_f5.103a8239.28ed3614_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Wurlitzer electronic for home available From: "Patricia and Bill Scoffield" <grampa@eagle.ca> Date: Thu, 04 Oct 2001 00:28:12 -0400   Friends, The husband of one of our recently-deceased organists in the Toronto area = has a 20-year-old Wurlitzer home organ (with 13 pedals) available for the = right price. He's 95, and would appreciate help in finding a good home for this item. Please call or email privately.   Bill Scoffield 905 797 2566      
(back) Subject: AGO, ametuers, Credentials, Etc. From: "Larry" <Larrytow@webtv.net> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 00:21:33 -0500 (CDT)   Hi listers, I know I don't post very often, but this issue has got to me. I am an Ametuer by any way you want to define it. I certainly am NOT trying to take jobs away from all the Real Organists that are out there. I do however fill in for my churches organist, when he needs a sunday off. Or can't do a funereal or wedding because of schudleing problems. I certainly can make no claim to being as great a musician that our organist is; I can however play a decent service. We who do this are only trying to better the art, NOT trying to be who you are! We ametuers owe you a great deal; who would inspire us to do our very best and then some, if it were not for all you who make it your lifes work to be the best there is?   I know I could never pass the FAGO or ChAGO or AAGO exams! Probbably not the Service playing one! But, all of you who can and DO it have my utmost respect. It perhaps may mean nothing in the big picture of the world; but those of us who know about organ music, we know! And we ARE impressed!   Still , the AGO is NOT a trade union. I am not sure if it wants to be ( and is not ) or if it is only a guild of like minded people who love organs and their music. I am not a memeber because I feel my abilities are not up to the standard. I know I can join just by paying the money; somehow, unless I can rate my skill level among you, it just don't seem right to call myself one of you.   All that aside, I DO think God likes to have us ametuers helping out in worship now and then. It may not be as nice as it possibly can be, but I do pray that God gives me the ability to make the folks think of Him, rather than how poor I sound compared to the Real organist.   To sum up, I own a towing service ( which is a legitimate calling to do Gods work, someone has to do it. ) but, I love the organ and everything to do with it, so I want to help when and where I can. I do NOT want to take jobs from the REAL professionals. If it were not for you all, who would set my standards?   Regards, Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: AGO, ametuers, Credentials, Etc. From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 01:54:47 EDT   Hi Larry and list:   I've been meaning to make these remarks for a long time. The office of substitute organist is a very important one. No one needs to be apologetic about short comings, we all have them. The value of a good substitute is worth his weight in gold. Never mind that he/she doesn't play the service just like the regular organist. Sometimes the congregation could use a change of pace and style. It's very daunting to try to fill another persons shoes, and perhaps just for a week or two. Each minister or priest has his own individual style even within a denomination. This can be an electric experience. keeping one on his toes. Without available substitutes we would really all be up against it at one time or another.   I play in an RC church traditional no II. I must confess the last time I went on vacation, I hiered a substitute that will be permanently "in = house". We have 5 services every Sunday, and I did them all for 4 1/2 years. Gerry wanted to play a regular service every Sunday, so I offered him the last Sunday Mass. We get along great, and my need of a sub, was taken care of more or less permanently. I won't be paying as much in taxes, and it's a happy situation all around. We all need a safety net, and I scooped up mine! :)   Regards to all amateurs and substitutes,   Ron Severin