PipeChat Digest #2457 - Thursday, October 25, 2001
 
Re: Hammond card for Allen
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
giving up couplers (!) for Lent (!!)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: MIDI problem.
  by "John Haskey" <johnh@haskey.net>
Cannon Music
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: tierces in chorus mixtures / an early crescendo mechanism
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Cannon Music
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Piston dependency
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
A Two-Day Organ Orgy
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: The Crescendo Crutch
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Hammond card for Allen From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 14:25:16 -0400   I remember selling the MOS-1 Allens back in the early/mid 70's. I was employed by Cannon Music Co. (now OUT OF BUSINESS) in Tampa, Florida and worked directly under Gene Graham (recently deceased). What I remember = when we sold an Allen w/card reader was installing a drawer under the keyboard, and stuffing it full of cardboard punch-cards. Also I remember labeling = the cards by hand and drawing an arrow on the card to show which way to insert into the card reader. The cards were duplicated at a local grocery store office on their IBM mainframe. I also remember using my phone bill to generate different reed stops. (remember the punch card, don't fold, spindle or mutilate?) Tom Hoehn, Organist Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL Royalty Theatre, Clearwater, FL First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn ----- Original Message ----- From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 1:02 PM Subject: Re: Hammond card for Allen     > When I bought my 603, it came with a huge stack of cards, several of = them > being bells and chimes, and solos. I noticed that some of them were plain, > brown, cards with the name of the card written on them in pencil. Also = a few > of them had no holes punched in them. But no where on these brown cards was > Allen organ company ever reffered to. Of course on the other ones, the ones > with the colors, Allen organ was written on the cards. > I take it that these cards were easily copied, but surely they are > copywrited? > Josh > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: giving up couplers (!) for Lent (!!) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 11:28:34 -0700   I couldn't PLAY a service without Swell to Great ... motor goes on, all = the unison couplers go on, all the f8' oundation stops get drawn, all the = reeds get prepared (grin), and off we go.   Of course, we DO play the organ as little as possible during Lent, and = even LESS (no voluntaries) during Passiontide and Holy Week.   Cheers,   Bud   "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > Tom Hoehn writes: > > >The crescendo is settable so I can actually program what I want to add = and > subtract as I use the pedal more. > >I for one grew up playing using the crescendo pedal in church > > If you still use it often in church, try giving it up for Lent. I gave = up > Swell to Great for service playing one Lent when I was a student. My > friends all laughed, but I thought that I was using it so much that it = was > becoming a bad habit, and my registrations would improve if I learned to = do > without it. > > This reminds me, however, that the very first thing engaged by the = crescendo > pedal was Swell to Great (whereby I cheated on my Lenten discipline once = or > twice). This is often true, and when so, it can be a very handy way to > control that coupler if you lack a reversible, or even sometimes when = you > have one but your fingers are not in its vicinity. One might bear the > possibility in mind for whatever coupler comes on first. > > Paul Emmons > > > -----Original Message----- > > From: Tom Hoehn [SMTP:thoehn@theatreorgans.com] > > Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 1:31 PM > > To: PipeChat > > Subject: Re: Piston dependency > > > > The church that I play at (First United Methodist Church, = Clearwater,FL) > > has a small Rodgers 2m in the chapel. I use it every Sunday for the = 8:30 > > service. There are several combinations for the Crescendo,/Swell = pedal. > > One is to select the CRESC. Reversible (LPB) This puts all swells on = the > > left shoe and the crescendo on the right. There is also a GR/PED > > unenclosed reversible as well. The crescendo is settable so I can > > actually program what I want to add and subtract as I use the pedal = more. > > I for one grew up playing using the crescendo pedal in church (I = remember > > it squeaking as the metal contact strip ran underneath the contact = fingers > > (1919 Kilgen Console). > > > > In Theatre organ work I use the crescendo the way a lot of artists use > > Second Touch on the Great to add that momentary Post Horn punch for > > emphasis, Since the Wurlitzer I play regularly doesn't have a very > > functional second touch on the great and the accompaniment second = touch > > isn't really regulated where it ought to be. > > > > Tom Hoehn, Organist > > Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL > > Royalty Theatre, Clearwater, FL > > First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL > > CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS > > <http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn> > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > From: Cremona502@cs.com <mailto:Cremona502@cs.com> > > To: pipechat@pipechat.org <mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 12:22 PM > > Subject: Re: Piston dependency > > > > In a message dated 10/24/01 11:24:42 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > > gedeckt@usit.net <mailto:gedeckt@usit.net> writes: > > > > > > > > > > > > Having grown up playing a Robert Morton 2/4 Theater Organ at a > > Catholic > > church [since abandoned and rescued, refinished and totally = restored > > > > with a loving owner now] > > > > > > > > > > um... heeheehee The organ or the church....???? ;-) > > > > > > > > A recent Rodgers console design has dual expression pedals, no > > crescendo, possibly a sign of things to come. This particular > > instrument > > does however permit configuring the instrument for use with an > > exposed > > Great division of pipes [or digital for practice in preparation = for > > performing on an exposed Great instrument], assigning the Swell = to > > the > > Left Expression Pedal...and the right becomes a Crescendo. So = it's > > not > > completely gone. > > > > > > > > > > This might be a very good place for a "crescendo pedal" on or off = switch. > > Any chance it's "hidden" in there?? > > > > Please visit the NEWLY RENOVATED Howling Acres at > > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > > > > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > > Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: MIDI problem. From: "John Haskey" <johnh@haskey.net> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 11:39:46 -0700 (PDT)       On Thu, 25 Oct 2001 RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Bob: > > I do know Midi might take a lot of room on the HD and 128MB of > memory would help too. What are the system needs on the > box containing the progam for midi? > > Ron >   MIDI files are probably the smallest multimedia file type out there. If you need soundfonts and the like for an on board synth then yes the disk and memory space can be intensive. When MIDI became available it was easy to play *all* of Beethoven's Fifth on my 64k CP/M machine connected to my Casio CZ-1 through a modified serial port. 128MB NOT!!!   ---john.    
(back) Subject: Cannon Music From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 11:41:20 -0700   Good HEAVENS, Tom!   I still have music stamped "Cannon Music" that I bought there in the = FIFTIES (grin). I grew up in Lakeland, Bartow and Mulberry ... my first Allen = organ was a 25-pedal SHERATON (chuckle).   As I recall, Cannon had a branch in Lakeland as well ... I think they sold = St. David's Episcopal THEIR first Allen. We bought ours BEFORE that ... it = came from Streep Music in Orlando.   Cheers,   Bud-now-by-the-Beach-in-So-Cal   Tom Hoehn wrote:   > I remember selling the MOS-1 Allens back in the early/mid 70's. I was > employed by Cannon Music Co. (now OUT OF BUSINESS) in Tampa, Florida and > worked directly under Gene Graham (recently deceased). What I remember = when > we sold an Allen w/card reader was installing a drawer under the = keyboard, > and stuffing it full of cardboard punch-cards. Also I remember labeling = the > cards by hand and drawing an arrow on the card to show which way to = insert > into the card reader. The cards were duplicated at a local grocery = store > office on their IBM mainframe. I also remember using my phone bill to > generate different reed stops. (remember the punch card, don't fold, > spindle or mutilate?) > Tom Hoehn, Organist > Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL > Royalty Theatre, Clearwater, FL > First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL > CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS > http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn    
(back) Subject: RE: tierces in chorus mixtures / an early crescendo mechanism From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 14:49:25 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C15D85.C4FA0E00 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   Well, from what I've been reading of late, Bach himself liked (my word--he used and had them included in mixtures of organs he was consulted on) the tierce. Not that one is needed --afterall, one may like them-- but this could be a rationale for using or including a tierce in a chorus mixture when playing Bach if not all Baroque music, be it early, middle or late. Certainly and without a doubt Herr JS had deep desire for dissonance. = Given time he'd have surpassed chromaticism and possibly attained an atonal system. Geez do I wish I could have heard him play. In baroque pieces I have often added the Tierce to the lighter = 8-4-2-mixture registration, particularly when the Trumpet is on in the great. It adds a reedy texture while keeping the point and articulation that flues have. I don't think I would want to have ONLY a Tierc   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C15D85.C4FA0E00 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4522.1800" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><FONT face=3DGaramond color=3D#800000><SPAN = class=3D459554118-25102001>Well, from what I've been reading of late, Bach himself liked (my word--he used and = had them included in mixtures of organs he was consulted on) the tierce. Not = that one is needed --afterall, one may like&nbsp;them--&nbsp;but this could be = a rationale for using or including a tierce in a chorus mixture when playing = Bach if not all Baroque music, be it early, middle or&nbsp;late. Certainly and without a doubt Herr JS had deep desire for dissonance. Given time he'd = have surpassed chromaticism and possibly attained an atonal system. Geez do I = wish I could have heard him play.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DGaramond color=3D#800000><SPAN class=3D459554118-25102001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DGaramond color=3D#800000><SPAN class=3D459554118-25102001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DGaramond color=3D#800000><SPAN class=3D459554118-25102001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr align=3Dleft>In baroque pieces = I have often added the Tierce to the lighter 8-4-2-mixture registration, = particularly when the Trumpet is on in the great. It adds a reedy texture while keeping = the point and articulation that flues have. I don't think I would want to have = ONLY a Tierc </DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C15D85.C4FA0E00--  
(back) Subject: Re: Cannon Music From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 14:50:22 -0400   Cannon actually had upwards of 17 stores in their hey day in the mid 70's. The Lakeland store was downtown on Florida Ave if I remember correctly. = The Allen lines of demarcation were drawn just east of WinterHaven. Winter Haven, Lakeland were all Cannon Country and East to the Atlantic Ocean = were Streep. Cannon also had showrooms in Jacksonville, Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm. They surrounded Bud Streep and company. As a side note, Bud's son now works for Central Music in their Orlando show room selling Rodgers now. BTW - the duplicated Allen cards were done in Lakeland. You = probably know which grocery I'm referring to if you spent any time in that part of the state. Tom Hoehn, Organist Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL Royalty Theatre, Clearwater, FL First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 2:41 PM Subject: Cannon Music     > Good HEAVENS, Tom! > > I still have music stamped "Cannon Music" that I bought there in the FIFTIES > (grin). I grew up in Lakeland, Bartow and Mulberry ... my first Allen organ was > a 25-pedal SHERATON (chuckle). > > As I recall, Cannon had a branch in Lakeland as well ... I think they = sold St. > David's Episcopal THEIR first Allen. We bought ours BEFORE that ... it came from > Streep Music in Orlando. > > Cheers, > > Bud-now-by-the-Beach-in-So-Cal > > Tom Hoehn wrote: > > > I remember selling the MOS-1 Allens back in the early/mid 70's. I was > > employed by Cannon Music Co. (now OUT OF BUSINESS) in Tampa, Florida = and > > worked directly under Gene Graham (recently deceased). What I = remember when > > we sold an Allen w/card reader was installing a drawer under the keyboard, > > and stuffing it full of cardboard punch-cards. Also I remember = labeling the > > cards by hand and drawing an arrow on the card to show which way to insert > > into the card reader. The cards were duplicated at a local grocery store > > office on their IBM mainframe. I also remember using my phone bill to > > generate different reed stops. (remember the punch card, don't fold, > > spindle or mutilate?) > > Tom Hoehn, Organist > > Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL > > Royalty Theatre, Clearwater, FL > > First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL > > CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS > > http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: RE: Piston dependency From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 14:57:55 -0400   I find this whole conversation about the crescendo pedal highly amusing, because when I started playing the pipe organ at this church, that was the only way you could get any volume out of the thing. The cresc. pedal = seemed to bring in stops that weren't working from the console controls.   Now, after considerable repair over a period of time, I have been using = the thing less and less. Don't need it so much now any more, but I sure did = at the beginning!   However, the entire piston/preset works does not function, so I do everything by hand, sometimes using a helper, and do use that cresc. at times. It's quite an advantage having it separate, and not as part of the preset electronics.   Diane S.          
(back) Subject: A Two-Day Organ Orgy From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 14:52:25 -0400   I'm only quoting Anthony Newman's name for a famous LP of his, so don't be too upset about seeing the O word on these (sometimes) genteel lists! Those of you who have heard David Briggs know that he is one of the Seven Wonders = of the Organ World. The name Istvan Ruppert may be a bit obscure, although = Joe Routon delivered on PipOrg-L earlier this week a strong encomium as a = result of having heard Prof. Ruppert in New Jersey. Anyway, in two consecutive days, Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, I heard both of these players, = and it was a fabulous feast!   I first heard and met David Briggs in 1996, when I showed him the organ at St. Ignatius Loyola in New York. My reward was a quite incredible = improvised symphony in several movements, just for me!! Where was my tape recorder = when I (and the world) needed it? Not to worry. There is more where that came from. David played last Tuesday in a series at Trinity College,Hartford, called Twilight Tuesdays. These concerts are at 5 p.m., and the formula clearly works - the chapel was comfortably full. The Austin sounded wonderfully rich and gutsy, and while the acoustic is not terrifically = live, the organ's placement speaking fully and directly down the nave gives = great satisfaction - one is totally enveloped by the sound. With the Interstate bottled up in a pre-rush hour snarl, and a bit of a search for a parking spot, we arrived half way through the first piece, the Allegro Vivace from the Widor 5th. The effect of opening a door into a (sort of) transept, and suddenly being totally filled with such musical wonderment was a powerful experience. It almost said "all's right with the world." My response to = the Dupre Symphonie-Passion has gradually evolved from somewhat cool indifference into a passionate affair of the heart. David's playing of = this (I have now begun to realize) glorious music is just overwhelming!   What happened next was labelled as: "Improvisation on submitted themes: <Suite a la Francaise sur les themes populaires. Prelude, Air, Sarabande, Gigue, Adagio, Toccata>" When the themes were presented, I was sitting = where I could not see, so I don't know who handed the envelope over, and I think something less than intelligible was said that might have indicated who chose them, but I missed that as I was busy moving across the aisle. In = any case, they were, I would think, an improvisateur's dream, good musical (hymn) tunes familiar enough to the audience so the ingenious working out could be fully appreciated. For brevity, I am giving the tune names, and anyone who does not know to what tunes they refer can check the index of tunes in the nearest hymnal. The very names set me humming. St. Columba, = Cwm Rhondda, St. Denio, Puer nobis nascitur, and last but hardly least, = Repton. What we heard was something of a big cyclic symphony, rather than = individual movements based on one tune each. (We would have been short a tune if that had happened, unless I missed something.) The five tunes sprang up almost everywhere, often together in marvellous juxtaposition. There were wild Arabesques, bits of wonderful, twisting, turning, ever-so-clever harmonic brilliance, and the most ravishing multi-voiced fugue on rich Principal = tone imaginable on the tune St. Denio before the exciting tumult of the final Toccata. It was clear that an encore was required, and we were fed a = rather large and intricate bauble based on "The Teddy Bears' Picnic," sending us all out chuckling happily, but also much enriched. What a gorgeous musical experience! Thank you Trinity College for this. The next recital in the series is coming right up, on November 6th - Erwan Le Prado, 2000 Chartres Grand Prix winner, who is making the rounds right now. That concert is at = 5 p.m. also. I am opting to hear Mr. Le Prado in Greenwich (CT), at St. Barnabas' Church on the 4th at 5 p.m., because he is playing on a Richards Fowkes instrument, now a few years old, that I have not heard yet. I love the Stamford instrument by them, so it is about time I heard this somewhat larger neighboring one.   Part Two - Istvan Ruppert:   As Joe Routon mentioned in his posting, we have in part the Hungarian Culture Ministry to thank for the current tour of Istvan Ruppert, = Professor of Organ at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest. They have = granted him funds for the promotion of Hungarian organ music, and they could not have found a better spokesperson. At Western Connecticut State U. in Danbury, he gave a lecture on the subject at 1:00 yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon, with slides and some recorded music. With some help from = Stephen Roberts, whose growing organ department at the university sponsored the visit, I might be able to summarize that talk - it was full of interest. Having just a bit of computer savvy, I ended up running the laptop for the slides half way through the lecture, and had to stop taking notes at that point. We'll have to see if we can put something together. At 8 p.m., = Prof. Ruppert gave the recital described below at St. Peter Roman Catholic = Church in Danbury, CT.   The program began with the P & F on B-A-C-H of Liszt. Who better to hear this from than he who teaches at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music? (Some graduates listed in the notes are: Zoltan Kodaly, Bela Bartok, Sir Georg Solti, Erno Dohnanyi, and Eugene Ormandy, a pretty impressive alumni = list!) Hearing this virtuosic performance of this tumultuous work, I felt as I = did some years ago in turning pages for Phillip Kenyon, who taught at Charterhouse (where Vaughan Williams was for a time), playing Rhosymedre - there really was something special about that as there was about the Liszt this evening. Next, a Liszt work not often performed, a work I don't think = I have ever heard in a live performance: <Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen> written after the death of Liszt's daughter, Blondin. An amazing = passionate outpouring, at times somber, and at other times, bold and powerful. At the end comes a great gesture, the strong chorale <Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan>.   Frigyes Hidas (b. 1928) - Toccata (the third movement of a sonata). Hidas was a student of Kodaly, but this piece is not in the style of Kodaly. It = is a takeoff on the French toccata style with a bit of Gershwinesque music thrown in.Something of a pastiche, it is a wild and frenetic bit of = non-stop excitement!   Istvan Kolos {b. 1932) - Partita No. 1 - Lullaby, Chorale and Variations. Sinuous melody & accompaniment, with a French flavor which became more pronounced in the Chorale and some of the variations. In a way, some of = this partita seemed structurally like a romp through the Dupre 79 Chorales. At least, I think there is a real debt to Dupre, stylistically and = technically. At the end, there is a return to the Lullaby.   Zsolt Gardonyi (b. 1946) - Mozart Changes The youngest composer on tonight's menu. Gardonyi is now teaching somewhere in Germany. We began with a bit of real Mozart (Piano Sonata?) which ever so gradually metamorphosed into some pretty wild jazz - back to Mozart - back to jazz where it ended. A Hungarian Joe Utterback! Really interesting and highly imaginative stuff!   Zsolt Gardonyi - Grand Choeur - influenced by French music, with great masses of tone moving around bigtime. I found the idiom a bit muddled - wanting a second hearing. I failed to buy Prof. Ruppert's CD at the end. Perhaps this and some of what else we heard is found on that. The piece = did make a great and dramatic ending to an altogether fine recital, offering much new and of great interest.   There was indeed an encore, not a big wild one, but something pleasant and rich! I found out later it was the second movement from the Hidas Sonata, = of which we had heard the third Toccata movement earlier. Prof. Ruppert described it as "Hollywood Music." He may not watch a lot of movies!   He will be leading a workshop on Hungarian music at the AGO National in Philadelphia, so if you get a chance to make that choice, I would = certainly strongly recommend doing so.   So I must close with thanks to Stephen Roberts, his church (St. Peter), and the music department of Western Connecticut State for making this all happen. The organ students of the department were at full attention throughout, and I know gained a lot from having this superb musician in their midst. I certainly did. So did we all.   Autumnal Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler                      
(back) Subject: RE: The Crescendo Crutch From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2001 15:10:11 -0400   I've not ever seen any of that light show. Interesting. But I prefer the swell and crescendo open lights to the what-stops-are-we-using-now lights. If ya can't hear it's a flute, maybe you should play the pie-ana.   -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@socal.rr.com [mailto:quilisma@socal.rr.com] Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 2:26 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: The Crescendo Crutch     Go to your ROOM, Robert (grin).   I've often thought, in this age of LEDs and whatnot, that it WOULD be useful to have a small light above each stop so you COULD see when it came on in the crescendo sequence ... if nothing else, it'd be pretty at Christmastime (grin) ... what are those colors again? Red for reeds, yellow for strings ... well, we'd have to improvise from there ... true blue for Diapasons, green for flutes (green for flutes??? don't know where THAT came from ... my original inclination was PINK, but I gave it a pass), maybe a FLASHING red light for the party horn(s)?   Cheers,   Bud, who's about to conclude that being housebound for a time CAN be fun (grin)   "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote:   > Which means, what, the Toilette is occupied? > > >Oh yeah, the little Green Light IS on!!! LOL > > Jeff > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org