PipeChat Digest #2347 - Saturday, September 1, 2001
 
Re: talking instead of listening!
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Seeking information on denominational origins . . .
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
For those of you who love churches....
  by "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net>
Re: talking instead of listening!
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: talking instead of listening!
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
a few misconceptions Re: talking instead of listening!
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: talking instead of listening!
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Pipedreams Archive
  by "John Cormack" <jcorm@bellatlantic.net>
Roods, etc.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
my new position
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: talking instead of listening!
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Re: talking instead of listening!
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Pipedreams Archive
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: talking instead of listening! From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 04:52:16 -0500   Innkawgneeto@cs.com wrote: > When I was playing offertories, people were oh so rude. <snip>   > People are now starting to jabber during sermons   <snip>   > There was a time when pastors (and musicians) would simply stop, and > either > wait for errant yakkers, or call them down.   What's interesting about this thread is that it demonstrates how things can come full circle. Bud Clark can prolly comment better about this than I can, but it seems to me that during Medieval times (the "Dark Ages", if you will), the peasants were every bit as "rude" in church; primarily because they were "naves" (hence: where the term which applies to the gathering portion of the church building comes from) as opposed to the schooled and more gentlemanly (and gentle-womanly) nobility whom the surfs or naves served.   This also serves to explain the origins of the Rood (an early Anglicization of our present-day word "rude") Screen as a physical barrier to keep the Pearls (the Blessed Sacrament and things holy and set-aside to God's Service) from the "swine" (again: implying the unschooled common folks)   Obviously: over the ages, as people became more "cultured", the Rood Screen either disappeared altogether or became only a token piece of Chancel Ecclesiastical furniture in the form of the Communion Rail.   I *think* that's fairly accurate, but someone who's more steeped in church history like Bud can set me straight and "fill in the blanks" for whatever I may have missed here. . .   The point being: we're seeing Deja-vu all over again! Particularly in the case of the unchurched: why does any of this surprise us? It certainly has an historical precedent!   Happy Labor Day weekend to all!   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: Seeking information on denominational origins . . . From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 06:45:33 EDT   In a message dated 01-08-30 14:02:36 EDT, you write:   > I am going to trick her and make it the very > first prelude (while she is generally busy talking and disrupting the > prelude instead of listening or praying).   what is the point of doing this? merry  
(back) Subject: For those of you who love churches.... From: "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 08:09:01 -0400     --------------74821116B4A307F83601E1E6 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Here are links to on-line images of churches I've photographed...Enjoy!   St. Francis Xavier Church, NYC (my parish as a kid growing up in NYC. I earned my "L" from the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain with ten of these images.)   Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Newark, NJ   3 Saints Russian Orthodox Church, Garfield, NJ (my present parish)   Immaculate Conception Church, Mahwah, NJ   (to see a larger image of any particular image that might interest you, click the image)   Enjoy!!!   (In case your e-mail program can't read HTML, simply copy/paste the links below into your browser.)   http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D85010   http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D84990   http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D49690   http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D37929   -- ***************************************************** Healthcare references for everyone. "Recipient of the year 2000 Featured Site Award at healthAtoZ.com" http://home.earthlink.net/~marika57/m_erika.html   Internet Safety Lessons. Must reading for everyone. http://home.earthlink.net/~marika57/safetylessons.html *****************************************************     --------------74821116B4A307F83601E1E6 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Here are links to on-line images of churches I've photographed...Enjoy! <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D85010">= St. Francis Xavier Church, NYC</a> (my parish as a kid growing up in = NYC.&nbsp; I earned my "L" from the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain with ten of these images.) <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D84990">= Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Newark, NJ</a> <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D49690">= 3 Saints Russian Orthodox Church, Garfield, NJ</a> (my present parish) <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D37929">= Immaculate Conception Church, Mahwah, NJ</a> <p>(to see a larger image of any particular image that might interest you, click the image) <p>Enjoy!!! <p>(In case your e-mail program can't read HTML, simply copy/paste the links below into your browser.) <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D85010">= http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D85010</a> <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D84990">= http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D84990</a> <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D49690">= http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D49690</a> <p>&nbsp;<a = href=3D"http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D37929">= http://www.photo.net/photodb/presentation?presentation_id=3D37929</a> <p>-- <br>***************************************************** <br>Healthcare references for everyone. <br>"Recipient of the year 2000 Featured Site Award at healthAtoZ.com" <br><A = HREF=3D"http://home.earthlink.net/~marika57/m_erika.html">http://home.earth= link.net/~marika57/m_erika.html</A> <p>Internet Safety Lessons. Must reading for everyone. <br><A = HREF=3D"http://home.earthlink.net/~marika57/safetylessons.html">http://home= .earthlink.net/~marika57/safetylessons.html</A> <br>***************************************************** <br>&nbsp;</html>   --------------74821116B4A307F83601E1E6--    
(back) Subject: Re: talking instead of listening! From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 09:42:10 EDT   In a message dated 9/1/01 5:50:10 AM Eastern Daylight Time, arpschneider@starband.net writes:   << Bud Clark can prolly comment better about this than I can, but it seems to me that during Medieval times (the "Dark Ages", if you will), the peasants were every bit as "rude" in church; primarily because they were "naves" (hence: where the term which applies to the gathering portion of the church building comes from) as opposed to the schooled and more gentlemanly (and gentle-womanly) nobility whom the surfs or naves served. >>   True, but you have to remember that the Mass was being celebrated in a language the ordinary worshippers didn't know, so it didn't matter that = they also couldn't hear what was going on. For many of the people there, they were there because they were told they had to be there. The common people =   usually had no choice in what their religion was, whatever the major landowner in the area was, so were they.   In today's churches, most people are there because they want to be, and = the service is not in an alien language.  
(back) Subject: Re: talking instead of listening! From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 21:46:08 +0800   I'm not so sure about this. We had a Scottish minister, and I'm hanged if I could understand a word he was saying!! Bob E.   > In today's churches, most people are there because they want to be, and = the service is not in an alien language. >    
(back) Subject: a few misconceptions Re: talking instead of listening! From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 07:44:29 -0700       ContraReed@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 9/1/01 5:50:10 AM Eastern Daylight Time, > arpschneider@starband.net writes: > > << Bud Clark can prolly comment better about this > than I can, but it seems to me that during Medieval times (the "Dark > Ages", if you will), the peasants were every bit as "rude" in church; > primarily because they were "naves" (hence: where the term which = applies > to the gathering portion of the church building comes from)   Nope. "Nave" comes from "navis", meaning "ship", and early Romanesque = naves with their barrel ceilings looked for all the world like a turned-over boat. = Early Christians adopted several nautical symbols ... the boat, the fish, etc. = ... probably on account of Our Lord's miracles associated with them.   "Knave" has pejorative implications ... not all peasants were knaves = (grin).   > as opposed > to the schooled and more gentlemanly (and gentle-womanly) nobility whom > the surfs   "Serfs", meaning basically indentured servants and/or tenant farmers. = "Surfs" and "surfers" are the province of MY part of the world, among others = (grin).   > or naves served. >> > > True, but you have to remember that the Mass was being celebrated in a > language the ordinary worshippers didn't know,   Not entirely true ... if you look at the medieval macaronic carols, = everybody knew at least the incipits of most of the Office Hymns, the parts of the Ordinary of the Mass, etc. Latin was still SPOKEN, not only in church, but = in the universities, etc. ... true, the peasants didn't go to university, but = it was still MUCH more common than we think of it being.   I had a WONDERFUL experience at Holy Rosary in the 1960s ... for some = occasion or other, we decided to revive Sunday Vespers in LATIN ... when the choir = began the first Psalm, lo, there came this WAVE of sound from the nave ... ALL = the older people REMEMBERED the Sunday Psalms (which seldom changed) and were singing ALONG with the choir ... and Vesper probably hadn't been sung in = that church sing before WWII.   > so it didn't matter that they > also couldn't hear what was going on.   Again, not entirely true ... while the chantry Masses were indeed silent = Low Masses requiring the bell to let people know where the priest was in the = Mass, those were not "public" Masses for the congregation, but rather for the "private" intention of the individual or family who endowed the chantry; = the vast majority of public Masses on Sundays and Holy Days continued to be = Sung or Solemn Masses, in which most things would be audible, with the exception = of the Canon or Prayer of Consecration, which was always said silently, except = perhaps for the Words of Institution ... I don't know exactly at what point those stopped being chanted aloud. Interestingly, Luther RESTORED the chanting = of the Words of Institution in his liturgy.   > For many of the people there, they > were there because they were told they had to be there. The common = people > usually had no choice in what their religion was, whatever the major > landowner in the area was, so were they.   "Choice" wasn't a question until the Reformation; there WAS only ONE = Church. At the Reformation, England went whichever way the Sovereign went, and the = German provinces whichever way the Prince went. But up until that time what we = now regard as religious "freedom" simply wasn't an issue.   > In today's churches, most people are there because they want to be, and = the > service is not in an alien language. >   I find the Latin of the Mass a LOT less "alien" than the tortured = constructions of the new Episcopal Prayer Book (grin) ... I can UNDERSTAND the Latin; = what the PRAYER BOOK is talking about at some points is anybody's guess (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: talking instead of listening! From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 10:57:46 -0400   Richard Schneider wrote: > What's interesting about this thread is that it demonstrates how things > can come full circle. Bud Clark can prolly comment better about this > than I can, but it seems to me that during Medieval times (the "Dark > Ages", if you will), the peasants were every bit as "rude" in church; > primarily because they were "naves" (hence: where the term which applies > to the gathering portion of the church building comes from) as opposed > to the schooled and more gentlemanly (and gentle-womanly) nobility whom > the surfs or naves served.   This is quite interesting. With the dumbing down of American culture we = are certainly entering a new Dark Ages. But I question your etymology of "nave." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "nave" comes from the French "nef," which means ship, because the nave had roughly the form of a sea-going vessel turned upside-down (the O.E.D. doesn't talk about its = being upside-down; I get that from a lecture I once heard in architectural history). I could not find in the O.E.D. any entry for "nave" in the = sense of a person, rude or otherwise.   By the way, it's "serf" not "surf."   > > This also serves to explain the origins of the Rood (an early > Anglicization of our present-day word "rude") Screen as a physical > barrier to keep the Pearls (the Blessed Sacrament and things holy and > set-aside to God's Service) from the "swine" (again: implying the > unschooled common folks)   I'm curious as to your source for this, too. According to the O.E.D., "rood" means cros (originally a branch or twig); according to the = Webster's Third New International Dictionary, unabridged, a rood screen was often surmounted by a cross--with the implication that "rood screen" gets its = name from the fact that it is a screen surmounted by a cross. > > > The point being: we're seeing Deja-vu all over again! Particularly in > the case of the unchurched: why does any of this surprise us? It > certainly has an historical precedent! >   I certainly agree with you here, and hope you won't take my comments as being too "rood"!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipedreams Archive From: "John Cormack" <jcorm@bellatlantic.net> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 11:12:14 -0400   > ...........I wish I knew how to capture the > streaming audio so I could listen to it in the car. The sound quality isn't > great but its better than missing the show.   Try the shareware program Total Recorder.   For excellent sound quality, listen to the program on Friday from = 2130-2300 Eastern Time via the Wisc Public radio web site. If you have a broadband Internet connection the data rate is about 175kbps, Real Player format.   Also available on Sunday from 2100-2230 Eastern Time via KAMU (Real Player format, data rate 128kbps via broadband Net connection).   -- John Cormack jcorm@bellatlantic.net      
(back) Subject: Roods, etc. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 08:15:19 -0700       Somebody wrote:   > > This also serves to explain the origins of the Rood (an early > > Anglicization of our present-day word "rude") Screen as a physical > > barrier to keep the Pearls (the Blessed Sacrament and things holy and > > set-aside to God's Service) from the "swine" (again: implying the > > unschooled common folks)   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > I'm curious as to your source for this, too. According to the O.E.D., > "rood" means cros (originally a branch or twig); according to the = Webster's > Third New International Dictionary, unabridged, a rood screen was often > surmounted by a cross--with the implication that "rood screen" gets its = name > from the fact that it is a screen surmounted by a cross.   "Rood" indeed does mean the Cross ... Rood(e)mas Day is the Feast of the = Holy Cross, Sept. 14 ... there are many medieval carols that speak of the = "Rood(e) Tree" , "hung on Rood(e) for our salvation", etc. ... the two feasts of = the Cross, the Finding in May and the Exaltation in September were both great medieval festivals.   Rood screens and rood lofts had two purposes: first, the medieval western church, in agreement with the east, regarded the Sanctuary as heaven in = symbolic terms ... like the Royal Doors of the east, the Rood screen separated the = Nave (earth) from the Sanctuary (heaven) ... and in fact many medieval rood = screens HAD gates resembling the Royal Doors, though opening and closing them = never became a fixed part of the liturgy as it did in the east.   Second, the rood screens simply closed off the Great Quire (the east arm = of the cross in a cruciform church) from the nave for practical purposes ... many churches were monastic foundations; the Great Quire was the monastic = church, used for Divine Office and other daily services.   In England it was the custom to erect a "Jesus Altar" WEST of the rood = screen in the Crossing, where Mass was sung for the people on Sundays and Holy Days = ... so there was no conscious effort to exclude the people from hearing and = seeing the celebration of Mass. Nowadays, of course, everybody's invited up into the = Great Quire in a large cathedral or collegiate church, since the quires can comfortably hold the average Sunday congregation.   I don't think anyone disputes the "rudeness" of medieval life in general = ... there are entries in the minutes of Chapter at St. Paul's Cathedral, = London AFTER the Reformation attempting to regulate merchants' stalls WITHIN the cathedral, and also complaints about packs of dogs running about and = relieving themselves (!). The Verger's staff originally had a practical use ... to = clear the way for processions and break up dog fights (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: my new position From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 11:38:39 -0400     >> >> > Randy: > > Don't know about Sleep, but glad to get your new position. Wanny report = on > how things are going there? (Or have you already done so, and I've = missed > it somehow?) > > Alan Freed > Saint Luke's Church > New York City >   Hi, there. Thanks for asking. I started in mid-summer, which was a good way to ease in, as the choirs were on vacation. I switched to this church because it was only 22 minutes away, while my previous church was 45 minutes' distance. There were other advantages, too. I am now music director and not just organist, as at my earlier job, so while it's more work it's more rewarding because I'll be making all the musical decisions.   The organ is a 1934 Moller, opus 6233. Swell: Bourdon 16' Viole 8' Voix Celeste 8' Salicional 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Principal 4' Orchestral Flute 4' Octave 2' Plein Jeu III Trompette 8' Clairon 4' Oboe 8' Vox Humana 8' Tremolo Swell to Swell 16' Swell to Swell 4' Swell Unison Off   Great: Double Open Diapason 16' Principal 8' Second Open Diapason 8' Violoncello 8' Gemshorn 8' Clarabella 8' Octave 4' Flute Harmonique 4' Super Octave 2' Harp 8' (not in prime condition) Tromba 8' Mixture III Tremolo (doesn't seem to work at the moment) Great to Great 16' Great to Great 4' Great Unison Off   Choir: Dulciana 16' Dulciana 8' Dulciana 4' Dolce 2 2/3' Dolce Fifteenth 2' Geigen Principal 8' Unda Maris 8' Krummhorn 8' Principal 4' Rohr Flute 4' Octave 2' Harp 8' (same as on Great) Tremolo Choir to Choir 16' Choir to Choir 4' Choir Unison Off   Echo (playable on Great--not a separate manual): Echo Flute 8' Flute 4' Viola de Gamba 8' Flute Celeste 8' (use with Echo Flute 8' for celeste effect) Clarinet 8' Octave 4' Chimes Tremolo   Pedal: Resultant 32' First Open Diapason 16' Second Open Diapason 16' Violon 16' Bourdon 16' Lieblich Gedeckt 16' Dulciana 16' Tromba 16' Octave 8' Flute 8' Dulciana 8'   Swell to Great 16' Swell to Great 8' Swell to Great 4' Choir to Great 16' Choir to Great 8' Choir to Great 4' Choir to Swell 16' [sic!] Choir to Swell 8' Choir to Swell 4' Echo to Great 8' Echo to Great 4' Great to Choir 16' [sic!] Great to Choir 8' (includes Echo division, if latter coupled to Great) Great to Choir 4' " " " Great to Pedal 8' " " " Great to Pedal 4' " " " Swell to Pedal 8' Swell to Pedal 4' Choir to Pedal 8'   All Swells to Swell (doesn't seem to work at the moment) Crescendo Pedal Sforzando   Echo expression pedal Choir expression pedal Swell expression pedal Great expression pedal   The Great, Swell, Choir, and Pedal divisions are in the front of the = church, hidden on either side of the altar; the Echo division is in the rear balcony, where the console is located. There are both general and divisional pistons, six in each category.   As you can see there are a couple of astonishingly bizarre things about = this instrument: no swell to choir, but choir to swell instead, and great to choir (in addition to choir to great). I can't for the life of me figure out why this was done or what I can do to exploit it--except perhaps use some combination of sub- and super-couplers Great to Great, Choir to = Choir, Great to Choir or Choir to Great to make a difference between the Great = and the Choir when all the stops are pulled. I notice that when the sforzando is on, the Great to Choir couplers are on. It's darn inconvenient not to have a Swell to Choir coupler. I'll either have to pretend my Choir is a Swell and vice versa, or take everything off the Great (via the Great = Unison Off) and couple both Swell and Choir to it so as to have a Choir with = Swell coupled to it.   Apart from those considerations, it's a really rewarding instrument to = play. There are three services a week: 5:30 Saturday evening, and 8:00 and 10:00 Sunday morning.   The "Adult Choir," as they call it, begins rehearsing this coming = Wednesday. I'm already having to deal with a problem the previous music director suffered through but which I hope to nip in the bud. It's that two = married couples in the choir are in the habit of bringing their misbehaving = toddlers to choir practice, where they are a distraction to everybody else, and to the 10:30 service up in the rear balcony where the choir sings and the = organ console is, where they run about and make noise which not only distracts everyone else but is picked up on the radio broadcast. Having been forewarned and being in no mood to put up with this nonsense, I have arranged for childcare to be available for the Wednesday evening choir practice (it's already been available on Sunday morning) and have = persuaded the Worship and Music Committee to issue an edict, which we hope the = Church Council will endorse, that no one is to be allowed in the rear balcony during Sunday services except the organist and those singing in the choir (and those running the radio broadcast). Safety reasons are cited (the little tykes could conceivably tumble over the railing), along with the distraction factor. The rub is, the two married couples with those = children had in the past threatened to leave the choir if they couldn't let their children run amok during rehearsals and Sunday service. Apparently they = are very good singers and would be sorely missed in what is already a pretty tiny choir (10 or 12 on a good day). But since I've yet to conduct the choir, if they leave right away I will not know what I'm missing. = Besides, I'd rather have a decimated choir I could build up again than the intolerable distraction the children have, from all accounts, been = creating.   There's also a bell choir, which rehearses on Wednesdays just before the Adult Choir. The church will be delighted if I start up a children's = choir program again, which I am doing. In addition, the pastor expects me to = help in a musical way with the high school youth group which meets on Sunday evenings. I don't begrudge all the time I'll have to devote to these aspects of the job, as they pay me very well.   There's a male quartet, some of whom are also in the Adult Choir. They kinda do their own thing, mainly gospel. Plus, and I think it's a major plus, we have a Brass Quartet who accompany the hymns at the 10:30 service and are available to play with the Choir on anthems that call for brass. I'll find some music for brass and organ that we can do. Should be fun.   You can take a peek at the church's web site at http://www.luther95.net/ZLC-HOH/     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Re: talking instead of listening! From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 11:41:07 -0400   *************************************************************** Glenda Wrote:   While I dislike this piece (it's a great hymn, but the old term "familiarity breeds contempt" is true, because I heard it 378 or more too many times in my childhood), I am going to trick her and make it the very first prelude (while she is generally busy talking and disrupting the prelude instead of listening or praying).   followed by Wayne Grauel:   For the late service, their total lack of respect had basically turned the concept of prelude into either Pre Loud or a unique game of cat & mouse... which was really quite fun and tended to get their attention.   ***************************************************************   Hi Glenda and Wayne....   Great posts!   One Sunday about 18 years ago we had a number of "noisy" talkers in a cathedral. I was playing a Prelude by Sir Charles Stanford which contains = a hefty crescendo to "FF" followed by a "grand pause" of silence and continuing with an extremely quiet section. My associate nearly doubled over with laughter when we both heard -- in a loud voice -- "I fry mine in butter!"   Case closed! :-)   BBD   Bonnie Beth Derby, B.Mus., M.Mus. Organist & Director of Music, St. James Roman Catholic Church, Syracuse [1988 Odell/Kerner & Merchant 33-rank tracker organ] Producer & Host: "Orgelwerke" & "Choral Traditions", WCNY-FM, 91.3, Syracuse; WUNY-FM, 89.5, Utica; WJNY-FM, 90.9, Watertown; Website: www.wcny.org e-mail: orge@dreamscape.com      
(back) Subject: Re: talking instead of listening! From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 11:40:53 -0400   Oh, I get it--knaves! Duh.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipedreams Archive From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 11:50:09 -0400   > Try the shareware program Total Recorder. > > John Cormack > jcorm@bellatlantic.net   Thanks for the tip concerning Wisconsin Public Radio. By the way, have = you checked out www.andante.com? There was an article in the NY Times this = week about them. A fabulous fine music website, with archived video/audio concerts, plus a dandy radio station that plays lots of organ music (so = far I've heard Widor's complete Fifth Organ Symphony), probably because it's = run by a Frenchman who appreciates the French organ repertoire. Anyway, the reason I bring it up is that it's the highest fidelity I've yet heard on = the web. The second best I've heard is France Musiques available through www.francelink.com (click on "Radio", then on "Radio France"). They play continuous fine music between 7:00 p.m. and midnight every evening, with minimal announcing of titles and composers. You don't need to know French to enjoy it.   What does this shareware do? I have an iMac and just plug in a connection between my tape deck and a little hole in the side of the computer. Quality's pretty good. Will Total Recorder help me do this better?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu