PipeChat Digest #2389 - Wednesday, September 19, 2001
 
Re: VT Organ Crawl Report (long, xpost)
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re:  Comments
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re:  Comments about Brooklyn Paramount NOT St Patrick's!
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re:Speagles
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re:Speagles
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Comments about Brooklyn Paramount NOT St Patrick's!
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
choir practices
  by "Susan Weaver" <susan-weaver@utulsa.edu>
RE: AOL 6.0 problems
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
New Aeolian-Skinner CDs & Barber's Adagio
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
RE: OHS Latest offerings
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: choir practices (LONG)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Proselytizing
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Proselytizing
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Proselytizing
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: OHS Latest offerings
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: VT Organ Crawl Report (long, xpost) From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 08:03:21 -0400   Hi, Bruce- I didn't take pictures (I was too nervous about demonstrating for the first time) but some others did, and I'll see if I can get some of them posted. I don't remember the Clariana standing out as anything other than a gentle open flute, and I didn't get a good look inside the Jardine. Maybe next time I get up north....   P   >Thanks for the review, Paul. Sounds like a wonderful time. Any chance >you have some pictures I could put on my webpage? > >Also, what does the Clariana sound like? Did you get to see it? etc. > >bruce > >Please visit the NEWLY RENOVATED Howling Acres at > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > >Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com >with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: Comments From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 08:35:13 -0700   > >Tell me about St. Patrick's and the Brooklyn Paramount, in that order. > >signed, >S. Joseph Lowkis   Can't tell you about St. Patrick's but we have decided to postpone our scheduled concert there on Sept. 29. It was done with great reluctance, but the relative proximity to the disaster site coupled with possible transportation problems and the perceived unwillingness of an audience to venture into the city moved us to that decision. Ralph Bacha is a great organist and we'd like to assure him an audience. We and he are eager to reschedule when conditions warrant.   John Vanderlee Board member NYTOS --  
(back) Subject: Re: Comments about Brooklyn Paramount NOT St Patrick's! From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 08:54:14 -0700   Typo Alert! Corrected text below:   >Tell me about St. Patrick's and the Brooklyn Paramount, in that order. > >signed, >S. Joseph Lowkis   Can't tell you about St. Patrick's but we have decided to postpone our scheduled BROOKLYN PARAMOUNT concert on Sept. 29. It was done with great reluctance, but the relative proximity to the disaster site coupled with possible transportation problems and the perceived unwillingness of an audience to venture into the city moved us to that decision. Ralph Bacha is a great organist and we'd like to assure him an audience. We and he are eager to reschedule when conditions warrant.   John Vanderlee Board member NYTOS --   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org --  
(back) Subject: Re:Speagles From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 08:56:15 -0700   Bruce, you might enjoy this!   John V     http://community-2.webtv.net/Arooo/SPEAGLESPIX/  
(back) Subject: Re:Speagles From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:23:20 -0700   sorry, that was meant for Bruce only!....   John V   with a slippery keyboard this AM  
(back) Subject: Re: Comments about Brooklyn Paramount NOT St Patrick's! From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:31:08 -0400       John Vanderlee wrote: > > > Can't tell you about St. Patrick's but we have decided to postpone > our scheduled BROOKLYN PARAMOUNT concert on Sept. 29. It was done > with great reluctance, but the relative proximity to the disaster > site coupled with possible transportation problems and the perceived > unwillingness of an audience to venture into the city moved us to > that decision. Ralph Bacha is a great organist and we'd like to > assure him an audience. We and he are eager to reschedule when > conditions warrant. >   I grew up in NYC, and spent much time visiting with my mom there as long as she lived. In my life, I've only been into the Brooklyn Pararount once, as a kid, watching a Martin & Lewis movie.   I was more fascinated with the ceiling than the movie.   The organ remained in the pit, and there was no Stage Show.   Stan Ipswich, MA born in Brooklyn & Proud of it.  
(back) Subject: choir practices From: "Susan Weaver" <susan-weaver@utulsa.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:55:42 -0500   I am an organist who now finds herself directing a choir as well as = playing the organ and I could sure use some help! I direct a volunteer choir of about 14 dedicated people and would like some input on what others do to get their voices warmed up and ready to sing. We have some obstacles to work with: people straggle in anywhere up to half an hour late, they really dislike "warm-up exercises", they want to practice every hymn for the following Sunday (usually 5). Practice is set to begin at 7:00 p.m. and soon after 8:00 people start checking their watches and some even say their voices are "shot" for the evening. (I tell those people not to = worry about singing then, that just being there and listening will help them learn the music.) Practice ends around 8:15. Nearly every week several people stay late to work on solos or duets/trios/quartets, so I know they love to sing. I try to make choir practice enjoyable, taking time between =   songs to share something humorous, etc. It's not as if I expect them to sing continuously for an hour and a half! Since I am not a trained vocalist I tell them they need to tell me if I am asking them to do something impossible for a singer to do (the joke is that my fingers don't =   need to breathe) and believe me they don't hesitate one bit to let me know =   when I am working them too hard!   I've been calling the time spent going over the hymns our warm-up, but = feel that something more should be done. I never took voice lessons, nor sang in a choir that truly warmed up their voices. Does anyone have any suggestions? Should I just go ahead and start rehearsals with some = warm-up exercises and let those who dislike them just show up late if they so desire? Is there a way to incorporate the hymns in the warm-up procedure (singing through them on a vowel sound or something one time and then singing a verse or two? If so, what vowel sounds? and how many different =   ones should I use?)   Ideas, anyone?   Thanks for your input!   Susan Weaver Organist/Choir Director, St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Tulsa, OK    
(back) Subject: RE: AOL 6.0 problems From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:47:53 -0500   How did you restrain yourself so successfully?     Stan   (Who just bought another $157.31's worth of CDs at OHS - thanks Bill!)   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: New Aeolian-Skinner CDs & Barber's Adagio From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 11:43:03 -0400   Several new CDs on Skinner and Aeolian-Skinner organs have just been added to the opening page of the OHS Catalog at http://www.ohscatalog.org. Two = of New York's best-known Aeolian-Skinners are featured on two CDs just = released by Pro-Organo:   In her latest CD, Dorothy Papdakos improvises on the famous = Aeolian-Skinner at the Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City. Everything from "Take Me Out to the Ball Game," to "Go Down Moses," to "Happy Trails to You." Much of this is recorded in live performances at concerts and church services.   At Riverside Church, Timothy Smith plays his own transcriptions of famous works as well as Romantic organ works well suited to the Riverside organ, and several "blockbusters" of the great organ repertoire.   Several others are there, too, including Tom Murray's new 2-CD set from Woolsey Hall on JAV.   Sheet music of Barber's Adagio for Strings (William Strickland's transcription/arrangement) is available from the OHS Catalog as well. = Click the red "Sheet Music" button on the panel at the left, then, on the page that comes up, select the "B" portion of the alphabet. All of the sheet music by composers whose last names start with "B" will appear.   Elgar's "Nimrod" is another favorite and arrangements of it are available = in a collection of 60 pieces called The Essential Organist (MB96057) and also in the Oxford Book of Ceremonial Music for Organ. Other goodies among the 32 pieces in the Oxford volume include Parry's "Elegy," Maria Theresia von Paradis' "Sicilienne," and the Walford Davies "Solemn Melody." There are also numerous festive works in both collections. Find them in the "Collections" subsection under "Sheet Music".   Bill    
(back) Subject: RE: OHS Latest offerings From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 11:59:31 -0400       "Storandt, Peter" wrote: > > How did you restrain yourself so successfully? > > Stan > > (Who just bought another $157.31's worth of CDs at OHS - thanks Bill!) >   They are truly irresistible CDs. The theatre organ vidios put me over the edge..   Again, Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: choir practices (LONG) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:09:13 -0700   Dear Susan,   Since you are in an Episcopal Church, first of all, join the Royal School = of Church Music in America ... they have all manner of "how-to" books for the amateur choir director.   http://www.rscmamerica.org/   Then get yourself a copy of "The Episcopal Musician's Handbook" from The = Living Church Foundation, if you don't already have one. It's a GOLD MINE of all = KINDS of information.   http://www.livingchurch.org/default.asp   I inherited a choir similar to yours when I came to St. Matthew's. There = was a forty-five minute rehearsal before Mass on Sunday, no week-day rehearsal, = and "anthems" consisted of hymns sung from the Hymnal.   The RECTOR turned things around as much as anyone. He went to the choir = and said, "we are GOING to have a TWO-hour rehearsal on a week-day ... pick = the day." He was also very specific and very adamant about the changes he = wanted in the service music.   At present, we rehearse from 7-9:30 pm on Thursday, with a fifteen-minute break, and from 8:15-8:45 am on Sunday.   If people consistently come late, then move the rehearsal back a = half-hour.   We at least LOOK at the hymns for Sunday; if one's unfamiliar, or there = are one or more verses printed underneath the music, we sing those.   That passes for a warm-up for us ... or I begin with a unison chant, if = all the hymns are familiar. In my opinion, warm-up EXERCISES aren't a sword worth falling upon. If they don't want to do them, don't do them.   If they say their voices are shot after only an hour, they're not singing correctly. NEVER allow them to sing above mp+ in rehearsal.   Given the kind of music we do, I allow my choir to sing forte in SERVICE = twice a year: Christmas and Easter.   "If you can't hear all four parts around you, you're singing too LOUD."   If you rehearse in a choir room, "circle the wagons" and have them in a = full circle around you and the piano.   Test their vocal ranges, section by section ... have all the sopranos = stand and sing a phrase of a familiar hymn ... move it up by half-steps and tell = them to sit down when it becomes uncomfortable ... then the altos, and so forth. = You may discover that you're doing things that are simply beyond their ranges.   I presume you use the 1980 Episcopal Hymnal ... it's somewhat better than = the 1940 as to the pitches of things, but some things are still too high for = the average congregation/choir.   If your organ has a transposer, simply take things DOWN a half-step or a = whole step, BUT DON'T TELL THE CHOIR (grin) ... some prima donna / primo uomo is bound to complain that it confuses her/him.   Mine are used to me transposing things all over the lot ... I write all = the Gregorian chants in no sharps or flats and then put them wherever they = need to be ... so they don't mind.   If I want to change the pitch of something in rehearsal, I simply play = handfuls of notes and say, "forget that pitch," and then give the pitch in the new = key.   CHALLENGE THEM. If they're BORED, they WILL lose interest after an hour.   SATB isn't the be-all and end-all. If you don't have four balanced parts, = do SAB, 2-part, or unison.   There's a wonderful series of anthem books called "Sing Joyfully" edited = by Mason Martens, and published by Walton Music Corp. ... Vol. 1 is unison, = Vol. 2 is 2-part, Vol. 3 is 3-part, Vol. 4 is 4-part. All are solid classical = pieces; none are falling-off-a-log easy.   Other SAB books I use constantly are "Sing For Joy", and "The SAB Choir = Goes for Baroque", both edited by Paul Thomas (Concordia). "Make A Joyful = Noise, edited by Walter Ehret (Shawnee) has a lot of interesting 18th century = Moravian things in it. "Sing In Exultation" (2 vols.), edited by Gladys Pitcher and published by Willis Music in Cincinnati is probably out of print, but you should be able to find it on Interlibrary Loan ... those two books are a TREASURY of all the old Anglican warhorses in decent SAB arrangements.   Unison and two-part -- the Morning Star Choir Books (1-2-3), also edited = by Thomas (Concordia). Oxford Easy Anthems also has lots of good unison, 2-part and 3-part anthems.   One technique I used to get them to take choir seriously was to have a = REAL anthem EVERY Sunday, whether unison, two-part, three-part or SATB. But it = had to be an ANTHEM, not a hymn with interludes. And we SANG it, come what = may. After a while, they learned they NEEDED to be there, and on TIME.   PLAN your rehearsals ... sing/play through every vocal part of every piece you're going to rehearse. Mark ALL the pitfalls in your score ... pronunciation, odd intervals, places they're likely to breathe when they shouldn't, sudden changes in dynamics, etc. Then go through the pieces = one at a time with the choir and give THEM the marks BEFORE you begin them, so = you don't have to stop every measure or two.   Unless they're SUPER sight-readers, don't waste time with an initial run-through ... commence straight away rehearsing the parts, first one at = a time, then two at a time in all the possible combinations (S+A, S+T, S+B = and so forth), then three, and FINALLY four. A piece rehearsed methodically like = that will STICK ... they'll remember it when you pull it out NEXT year.   Put the responsibility for accurate singing on THEM. Sometimes I have mine = sing the COUNTING, rather than the words.   Since I'm organist-choirmaster, we have to mark EVERYTHING in rehearsal = ... I only give the occasional attack and/or cut-off in service. Before I came = to St. Matthew's, they had a separate organist and director, and were used to = being spoon-fed every cue. After some initial whining, they got over THAT = (grin). Now, I use one of the chanters for a time-beater / cue giver when = necessary.   ALWAYS put the most challenging piece first or second on your music-list, = when they're still fresh. I often leave the hymns (if we need to do them) for = LAST. I usually do the anthem for Sunday first, then a section of something = REALLY hard next ... right now we're working on difficult anthems for Christmas, = the dedication of our new church, and Easter (!), a section at a time.   Creating a spirit of dedication and professionalism in the choir takes = longer, and it's hard to put into words how to do THAT.   One way is to have folders, notebooks, and hymnals for each choir member, = and cubbies to keep them in. I have my people put their names on EVERYTHING, = so that they always use the same copies.   I post the anthems for a season; then beside it I post a large calendar = sheet; my people sign out if they're going to be gone on a given Sunday or = Thursday.   The more organized you LOOK, the more organized they will BE.   My desk at home may be total CHAOS, but when I walk into that rehearsal, I = know EXACTLY what I'm going to do, and the allotted time for each item. I've = worked with my group long enough that I pretty much know how long a run-through = of parts, etc. is going to take for each piece, but in the beginning I wrote = out a schedule.   SOCIALIZE. That's something I have difficulty getting my choir to do, = because the average commute is 30-45 minutes each way. But choir parties are great morale-builders.   It's OK to run a choir by consensus, once you've arrived at a consensus, = but it's still necessary to point out that choir-directing and choir-singing = ISN'T a democracy. YOU'RE the boss; the ultimate decisions are YOURS to make. = That was hard for me when I was young; now that I'm old and scary it's easy as = pie (grin). It has to be done tactfully, but it has to be done.   Good luck!   Cheers,   Bud-by-the-Beach                
(back) Subject: Proselytizing From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 12:09:52 EDT   Please pardon my ignorance, but did Jesus frown upon Proselytizing? I = know that in many religions, the most fervent and sincere Praise is done privately, and that any SHOW of righteousness, outside of worship = services, in an attempt to gain approval of one's fellow men, is considered sinful. =   Recruitment and brazen attempts at conversion are also frowned upon, in = that conversion is most sincere, and is only meaningful, when the convert feels =   that they have discovered a path for their life.   At the present time, a handful of Americans are being held hostage by the Taliban for trying to convert people to what appears to be somewhat fundamentalist, charismatic Christianity. This seems shocking to = Americans, who believe in freedom of religion, yet these people brought their = teaching materials and video progamming, fully aware that they were in violation of =   the laws and cultures that currently prevail in Afghanistan. Obviously, putting Christians to death for wanting to convert Moslems is extreme, inhuman, and not part of any rational system of law, but it is symptomatic = of things that are done to trigger "holy" wars.   In Judaism, as I am sure there is in ALL faiths, we have four levels of charity, called Tzedakah. The lowest form, still considered noble, is = when both the donor and the recipient know each others' identity. Next up the ladder, I BELIEVE, the donor is known, the recipient is not. Second from = the top is when the recipient is known, and the donor remains secret. At the = top of the list, neither the beneficiary nor the beneficent party know each other, and the act is one of pure charity, free of motive other than the knowledge, respect, and understanding of human kindness. Secret holiness.   Many men and women on this list of all faiths have a profound and gripping =   faith in their Creator, turning to the Almighty in times of stress, being thankful in times of rejoicing. Some of us simply privately thank The Almighty in a silent moment, TO OURSELVES, before each and every meal, = even a snack. We must remember that it is not possible to know just how faithful = or holy a person might be based upon their appearance or conversation. I = have found that those who proclaim their faith the most loudly and consistently =   have done some of the most shocking and horrible things, including clergy. = They often preach hatred and intolerance.   The two televangelists whose names have been most talked about on this = list (what denomination ARE they?) do not seem to hold much credibility in the established faiths, either in the Western or Eastern Tradition. We have wasted too much energy on them, except to acknowledge that they foment = hatred and misuse the Scriptures. Neither homosexuality and nor heterosexuality = are "taught"; one is either that way, or not. HATRED is taught, usually by extremely clever and resourceful people.   We must also realize that there are those among us who think that there is = NO divine being, that the world is the world, life is life, and fate is = random. We MUST accept that. And we must not diminish them as human beings by "pitying" them for their alleged "lack of faith." If one asks them what = it is they do NOT believe in, most "non-believers" come up with a very vivid = and detailed description of God, which is always quite pleasing. But whether they believe, or do not, or do not see the Light until the very last = moment of their earthly life, they are still judged by their ACTIONS, the way = they treat other human beings. Spewing Bible verse has NEVER protected anybody =   from the consequences of evil actions. Back to organs and organ music and =   organ playing and organ building...   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Proselytizing From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 12:17:29 -0400   Dear Seb, Well said. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2001 12:09 PM Subject: Proselytizing     > Please pardon my ignorance, but did Jesus frown upon Proselytizing? I know > that in many religions, the most fervent and sincere Praise is done > privately, and that any SHOW of righteousness, outside of worship services, > in an attempt to gain approval of one's fellow men, is considered = sinful. > Recruitment and brazen attempts at conversion are also frowned upon, in that > conversion is most sincere, and is only meaningful, when the convert = feels > that they have discovered a path for their life. > > At the present time, a handful of Americans are being held hostage by = the > Taliban for trying to convert people to what appears to be somewhat > fundamentalist, charismatic Christianity. This seems shocking to Americans, > who believe in freedom of religion, yet these people brought their teaching > materials and video progamming, fully aware that they were in violation = of > the laws and cultures that currently prevail in Afghanistan. Obviously, > putting Christians to death for wanting to convert Moslems is extreme, > inhuman, and not part of any rational system of law, but it is = symptomatic of > things that are done to trigger "holy" wars. > > In Judaism, as I am sure there is in ALL faiths, we have four levels of > charity, called Tzedakah. The lowest form, still considered noble, is when > both the donor and the recipient know each others' identity. Next up = the > ladder, I BELIEVE, the donor is known, the recipient is not. Second = from the > top is when the recipient is known, and the donor remains secret. At = the top > of the list, neither the beneficiary nor the beneficent party know each > other, and the act is one of pure charity, free of motive other than the > knowledge, respect, and understanding of human kindness. Secret = holiness. > > Many men and women on this list of all faiths have a profound and = gripping > faith in their Creator, turning to the Almighty in times of stress, = being > thankful in times of rejoicing. Some of us simply privately thank The > Almighty in a silent moment, TO OURSELVES, before each and every meal, even a > snack. We must remember that it is not possible to know just how = faithful or > holy a person might be based upon their appearance or conversation. I have > found that those who proclaim their faith the most loudly and = consistently > have done some of the most shocking and horrible things, including = clergy. > They often preach hatred and intolerance. > > The two televangelists whose names have been most talked about on this list > (what denomination ARE they?) do not seem to hold much credibility in = the > established faiths, either in the Western or Eastern Tradition. We have > wasted too much energy on them, except to acknowledge that they foment hatred > and misuse the Scriptures. Neither homosexuality and nor = heterosexuality are > "taught"; one is either that way, or not. HATRED is taught, usually by > extremely clever and resourceful people. > > We must also realize that there are those among us who think that there = is NO > divine being, that the world is the world, life is life, and fate is random. > We MUST accept that. And we must not diminish them as human beings by > "pitying" them for their alleged "lack of faith." If one asks them what it > is they do NOT believe in, most "non-believers" come up with a very = vivid and > detailed description of God, which is always quite pleasing. But = whether > they believe, or do not, or do not see the Light until the very last moment > of their earthly life, they are still judged by their ACTIONS, the way they > treat other human beings. Spewing Bible verse has NEVER protected = anybody > from the consequences of evil actions. Back to organs and organ music = and > organ playing and organ building... > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Proselytizing From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:34:46 -0700       TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Please pardon my ignorance, but did Jesus frown upon Proselytizing?   Jesus DID say "Go and teach all nations", but it's my understanding of the = Great Commission that the PRINCIPAL means by which this was to be accomplished = was by EXAMPLE, rather than by ringing doorbells and handing out tracts, etc. ... = "You will know they are Christians by their LOVE."   In my own parish, we're experiencing rather phenomenal growth, but it's = all by word-of-mouth ... no advertising, no doorbell-ringing. People like what = they see and hear when they come (usually invited by friends), and they stay.   To answer your other question, Falwell is a Baptist ... I have no idea = what flavour. I don't know if the Southern Baptist Convention claims him or = not. G-d only KNOWS what Robertson is ... confused, at best?   Good post, Sebastian!   Cheers,   Bud-by-the-Beach    
(back) Subject: RE: OHS Latest offerings From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 11:41:07 -0500   Uh oh, I feel a spending surge coming on....   -----Original Message----- From: Stanley Lowkis [mailto:nstarfil@mediaone.net] Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2001 11:00 AM To: PipeChat Subject: RE: OHS Latest offerings         "Storandt, Peter" wrote: > > How did you restrain yourself so successfully? > > Stan > > (Who just bought another $157.31's worth of CDs at OHS - thanks Bill!) >   They are truly irresistible CDs. The theatre organ vidios put me over the edge..   Again, Stan   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org