PipeChat Digest #2786 - Monday, April 1, 2002
 
Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do.
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Leiblich Gedact...
  by "Felix Hell" <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do.
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Gedeckt Translation
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Leiblich Gedact...
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
New/Different Pipes [X-Post]
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
RE: Compton Organs
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Dirk Zwart - RIP
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Easter Sunday in sunny hell
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do.
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do.
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Compton Organs
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
EASTER DAY- PLAZA PRES, CHARLOTTE, NC (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
New Trumpet Stop (crosspost)
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Felix Hell in Buffalo
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Compton Organs (Repost)
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do. From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 13:57:29 +0100   > The best, most permanent solution to this problem is to send the pipes > to an experienced pipemaker for the fabrication of external canister > tops, as Roy Redman suggests. Since these are fitted to the exterior of > the pipe body with the tuning point of the top of the canister at the > point of the "swelling" of the pipe walls, the damaged portion will be > cut away anyway. The felted canister tops will be fitted to the > unswollen portion of the pipe walls, since the pipes need to be > shortened in order to accommodate the metal canisters anyway. > > Our Pipeshop has done this kind of conversion to a number of stops which > were in this predicament.   Are there any English organ builders or could give an approximation of the cost of this? or maybe someone whohas had this done, or an American = builder who could give me a price in dollars that I could tell the music committee just as an VERY rough idea of what we're looking at.   Many thanks again, and a Happy Easter to all!   Steve    
(back) Subject: Re: Leiblich Gedact... From: "Felix Hell" <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: 31 Mar 2002 16:31 GMT   As to my best knowledge a "Lieblich Gedackt" is a metal pipe, at a scaling range somehow between medium and narrow, if you take a "Gedacktfloe= te" or a "Gedackt" as wide scaled, and a Quintade or a Pommer, which both can b= e wooden pipes also, as narrow scaled. And the translation of "Gedackt" simpl= y means, that the pipe is stopped, or "gedeckt". The stopper is called in German "De= ckel", or sometimes "Spund". Please advise, if I'm mistaken.   Felix Hell   "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> schrieb: > Lieblich Gedact means "lovely wood" I think -though it sounds as if your= =20 > pipes are metal. Had your thought of approaching the problem from the ins= ide=20 > - i.e. put some form of surface on the stoppers? > John Foss >=20 >=20 >=20 > _________________________________________________________________ > Send and receive Hotmail on your mobile device: http://mobile.msn.com >=20 >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20 >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do. From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 13:03:46 -0600   Stephen Barker wrote:   <Fitting felted canister tops to the unswollen portion of the pipe walls>   > Are there any English organ builders or could give an approximation of = the > cost of this? or maybe someone whohas had this done, or an American = builder > who could give me a price in dollars that I could tell the music = committee > just as an VERY rough idea of what we're looking at.   > Many thanks again, and a Happy Easter to all! Blessed Easter to you too!   Unfortunately, not offhand; primarily because such work, by its very nature, has to be handled on a time-and-materials basis. It all depends on the extent of damage, the number of pipes involved, what kind of metal they're made of, etc.   As general "rule-of-thumb", we would figure about 50% of the cost of new pipes. Maybe less, but again: we'd have to see what we're working with before being able to offer any kind of price. I think that would be true with any Pipeshop.   I hope this information steers you in the right direction. You might check with F.J. Rogers in England and see if they are willing to do this work for you. They're a very good pipemaking concern.   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Gedeckt Translation From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 14:05:50 EST   Gedeckt means "covered." Holz means "wood."  
(back) Subject: Re: Leiblich Gedact... From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 13:25:52 -0600   Felix Hell wrote: > As to my best knowledge a "Lieblich Gedackt" is a metal pipe, at a > scaling range somehow between medium and narrow, if you take a = "Gedacktfloete" > or a "Gedackt" as wide scaled, and a Quintade or a Pommer, which both = can be > wooden pipes also, as narrow scaled. And the translation of "Gedackt" = simply means, > that the pipe is stopped, or "gedeckt". The stopper is called in German = "Deckel", > or sometimes "Spund". Please advise, if I'm mistaken. Dear Felix and all,   A very comprehensive definition of Lieblich Gedackt can be found at the following URL: http://www.organstops.org/l/LieblichGedeckt.html   The usual American examples seem to be of wood, at least that's been my experience here in the Midwest. Although, as mentioned, I have seen an example or two made by Casavant with the stoppered metal pipes which have been the current topic. Almost invariably, 16' octaves would be made of wood.   Hope this is of helpfulness to everyone.   Faithfully, -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: New/Different Pipes [X-Post] From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 17:30:16 -0600   Okay: to make a long story short, everything works fine on our new pipe addition, but I really need some different pipes. The 4' Open Diapason rank that I have is an old lead Kilgen type, very heavy, and "calliope-type" sounding, which is not what I'm going for. (I installed the chest in my church as you will recall) I would be interested in purchasing a used 4' Principal rank of 61 notes (I already have 12 new pipes that add one octave and complete the 2' pitch). Does anyone have any of these around that would be okay to look at AND sound good? Also, what can I expect to pay for crating and shipping?   Using the 8 and 4 foot pitches works fine, but if you add the 2' or get too far up on the keyboard, it sounds like a calliope. Classical church music doesn't really sound good on this arrangement. The Kilgen pipes are better than no pipes at all---but I of course am not satisfied. By the way---the pipes that I had survived the F5 St. Peter (MN) tornado back in 1998---they were on the bottom of a crushed pipe warehouse.   Let me know---or if anyone has any other tips, tell me (please!!!).   Thank you! Paul  
(back) Subject: RE: Compton Organs From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 00:33:16 -0000   Hello,   I have been asked to write a few things about John Compton, even though = I do not claim to be any sort of expert on the subject.......in fact, = the book is crying out to be writen by someone.   However, I have played many Compton organs and, locally, we have a few = splendid examples of his work; both theatre and church/concert organs.   Compton served his apprenticeship with Brindley & Foster of Sheffield ( = Compton came from the Nottingham area I believe). That early experience = must have been formative because B & F were innovative in the extreme = when it came to action systems. B & F pioneered a pneumatic stop control = system which they called "Brindgradus". If memory serves correctly (and = I have no notes on the subject especially) they used a modified = "Kegladen" type of chest (German origins).   Compton himself spanned the period in which electricity played an ever = greater part in organ building and organ building experiments. His use = of electric action was always elegant and beautifully made; sometimes = downright "genius"....his combination setters and illuminated stop-heads = are classics in their time.   Tonally, Compton tried many, many experiments such as the = "Polyphone"....a sort of large box like a labrynth, with = valves......this enabled REAL 32ft pitch to be obtained from a box. It = was, I suppose, a sort of valved Haskell Bass?????? (But not open = ended!) Anyway, this wonderful box o'tricks could produce a note down to = botom EEEE, after which it continued to repeat the same note......and = why? Because Compton knew so much about tonal things, he recognised = that the human ear cannot distinguish pitch below bottom EEEE; so why = waste money on bigger pipes!!!!   Then came his remarkable experiments with mutations. This started when = he was on active service during the 2nd World War. With time to spare, = he played around with local organs in (I think!) Northern = Italy.....hacking the pipes about to create all sorts of new mutations. = This extraordinary vandalism gave him a fine understanding of mutations = and the subtleties of them.   Tonally, although Compton embraced the voicing methods of the = day....heavy-pressure, often leathered Diapasons, heavily weighted = reeds, much use of Zinc and plain metal pipes and Cinema Organs; he had = a far better understanding of tonal matters than most. I have personally = never come across a Compton Organ which sounds "dull"........there is = usually enough upperwork and mutations to add sprakle and brightness.=20   However, his real genius was in the tonal development of the extension = principle which he used freely and to good effect. In fact, he probably = made the finest extension organs of anyone in the world. I know from = experience that many Compton Organs are not only effective, there is = little sense of the "Octave Coupler syndrome". It has been said that he = treated chorus-work as one great Mixture, blending ranks one into the = other very effectively.....but I am no expert as I say. The trouble is, = although I know the organ of Hull City Hall very well, this is a largely = "straight" organ with very, very little extension which was only = enlarged and re-built by Compton.   I would just add that the quality of reed voicing in Compton organs is = superb. Not only were his Tuba ranks excellent, Compton often included = fiery Trumpets of the American type.   It is my hope that the very best Compton organs....those at the Odeon = Cinema, Leicester Square, and the magnificent sounding 140 plus stop = 4-manual at St Bide's, Fleet Street, remain just as they are.   I'm sorry not be more helpful on the subject, but my Schulze article has = to take precedence.Maybe I will get around to John Compton as my next = project.   Finally, the organ works situated at North Acton in London was, to the = best of my knowledge, the largest organ factory ever seen in the = UK.......it was far bigger than a mere workshop. I also understand, but = cannot verify, that very component was made "in house" by Compton.   As I say, a book is waiting to be written!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK  
(back) Subject: Dirk Zwart - RIP From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 19:28:35 -0500   A local newspaper reports the death of Dutch organist Dirk Zwart, son of = Jan Zwart, "last week." The local connection is that he played two recitals = at First Presbyterian Church here over the years.   Can anyone supply any details of his death, particularly the exact = date? Thanx.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Easter Sunday in sunny hell From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 18:45:11 -0600   ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA   THE DAY OF THE RESURRECTION: HOLY EUCHARIST, RITE II (Service music Healey Willan)   Prelude - Heut' Triumphiret Gottes Sohn Christ lag in Todesbanden [text H 186] - J.S. Bach Allegro from Organ Concerto No. 1 in C - Thomas A. Arne "The service today begins in triumph, the text of the first prelude being translated, 'Today God's only begotten Son arose from death and triumph won, Alleluia, Alleluia! In mighty pomp and rich array, His therefore be the praise always, Alleluia, Alleluia!'"   The Lighting of the Paschal Candle and Exsultet (said) "Traditionally the lighting of the Paschal Candle is part of the great Vigil of Easter celebrated on the evening of Holy Saturday, or in the darkness just before sunrise of Easter morning, to emphasize the Light of Christ and our Lord's victory over death and the darkness of the grave."   Hymn: Jesus Christ is Risen Today (Easter Hymn) - H 207 The altar candles are lit during the singing of the hymn. Sequence Hymn: The strife is o'er, the battle done (Victory) - H 208   The Renewal of Baptismal Vows Offertory Hymn: Come ye faithful, raise the strain (St. Kevin) - H 199 Offertory Presentation - while ushers process with the offerings of the people, the congregation sings Laudate Dominum (insert; found H 432:4): "O praise ye the Lord! Thanksgiving and song to him be outpoured all ages along! For love in creation, for heaven restored, for grace of salvation, O praise ye the Lord! A-men, a-men." Eucharistic Prayer D   Music during Communion: This joyful Eastertide (Vruechten; text H192) On earth has dawned this day of days (Erchienen ist der herrlich Tag; text H 201) Deck thyself, my soul, with gladness (Schmucke dich; text H 339) Come with us, O blessed Jesus (Werde munter; text H 336) Closing Hymn: "Welcome, happy morning!" age to age (Fortunatas) - H 179 Dismissal with Alleluias Postlude: In dir ist Freud - J. S. Bach Text: "In thee is gladness amid all sadness, Jesu, sunshine of my heart. By Thee are given the gifts of heaven, Thou the true Redeemer art. Our souls Thou wakest, our bonds Thou breakest, who trusts Thee surely hath built securely, he stands forever. Alleluia! Our hearts are pining to see Thy shining, dying or living, to Thee are cleaving, naught can us sever. Alleluia!"   Thursday we left the Lord and myself in discouragement. Friday saw a foray to buy plants, and Saturday more plants and a day outdoors. Saturday night after a hard day's planting at the farm I betook myself, laden with Easter baskets and outfits, to dinner with the godchildren. It was a thoroughly delightful time, and I fear I am in love and gave them all my money. I accompanied the family to the Easter Vigil service at their church. The children's outfits fit them perfectly.   Now don't take this wrong, but except for the sermon it was the awfullest service I had ever attended. All the music sans last hymn was praise music. And while I prefer traditional music, I have nothing against praise music. However, it was poorly performed and poorly sung. The tiny Moller student 2-manual 2 rank organ sat silent, and the musician plinked out the ditties on the piano - apparently she didn't know them. The final hymn was the Easter Hymn, and was sung with gusto, even without suitable accompaniment. However, the people there were good-hearted and kind to one another. And I found inspiration and encouragement from that service - God's grace works in mysterious ways.   I really feared that, with all the thorns and splinters in my hands, the arthritis, and the lack of practice, my Bach would suffer this morning. But I was pleasantly surprised that I made it through without a hitch, except for some visitor shouting in my ear at someone right about the third measure of the postlude. I faltered but went on and made it, if not a stellar, a most serviceable performance.   God's nature knew it was Easter Sunday, and the azaleas and dogwoods were in peak bloom this morning. Sadly, it stormed this afternoon, so they won't look quite so good tomorrow. We traveled in the driving rain to my brother's for a delicious late luncheon.   Next Sunday Massimo Nosetti will be here to perform in recital. Massimo has been here before, and in his honor Rick has a new grill ready to fire up his favorite steaks! He will play music of Mozart, Bach, Stanley, Morandi, and Pergolesi, inter alia.   I pray that your days and weeks be filled with His all-sufficient Grace.   Glenda Sutton              
(back) Subject: Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do. From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 20:13:42 EST     --part1_c8.24985f43.29d90e46_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/31/2002 7:58:21 AM Eastern Standard Time, steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk writes:     > Are there any English organ builders or could give an approximation of = the > cost of this? or maybe someone whohas had this done, or an American = builder > who could give me a price in dollars that I could tell the music = committee > just as an VERY rough idea of what we're looking at. > >   P & S Organ Supply in (i think) Suffolk is connectd with J W Walker and = they should be able to do the remedial work your pipes require. Any reputable builder could do this work. Willis and Mander and Nicholson and Harrison & =   Harrison and the list goes on... any of these firms can meet your needs. = Your local Maintenance provider should be able to get this work done for you should you wish for him/her to take care of this matter.   Rick in VA   --part1_c8.24985f43.29d90e46_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/31/2002 7:58:21 AM Eastern Standard Time, = steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Are there any = English organ builders or could give an approximation of the <BR>cost of this? or maybe someone whohas had this done, or an American = builder <BR>who could give me a price in dollars that I could tell the music = committee <BR>just as an VERY rough idea of what we're looking at. <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>P &amp; S Organ Supply in (i think) Suffolk is connectd with J W = Walker and they should be able to do the remedial work your pipes require. = Any reputable builder could do this work. Willis and Mander and Nicholson = and Harrison &amp; Harrison and the list goes on... any of these firms can = meet your needs. Your local Maintenance provider should be able to get = this work done for you should you wish for him/her to take care of this = matter. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_c8.24985f43.29d90e46_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Leiblich Gedact pipes: what to do. From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 21:35:04 EST   You might speak to F. J. Rogers, pipe makers. The proprietress, Elizabeth =   Buckle, is knowledgeable and personable. SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Compton Organs From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 00:08:13 EST     --part1_115.f27320a.29d9453d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/1/02 12:33:57 AM !!!First Boot!!!, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes:     > Then came his remarkable experiments with mutations. This started when = he > was on active service during the 2nd World War.   Can you elaborate on these experiments?   Are there any recordings on the remaining untouched Compton's?   Thanks much for the tome!!     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   --part1_115.f27320a.29d9453d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/1/02 12:33:57 AM !!!First Boot!!!, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Then came his = remarkable experiments with mutations. This started when he was on active = service during the 2nd World War. </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Can you elaborate on these experiments? &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Are there any recordings on the remaining untouched Compton's? <BR> <BR>Thanks much for the tome!! <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_115.f27320a.29d9453d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: EASTER DAY- PLAZA PRES, CHARLOTTE, NC (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 00:35:46 EST   EASTER DAY: THE RESURRECTION OF THE LORD Sunday, March 31, 2002   Plaza Presbyterian Church, Charlotte North Carolina The Reverend Dr. G. Thomas Tate, Pastor The Reverend Dr. Carol T. Bender, Parish Associate Scott Foppiano, Organist-Choirmaster   Organ Voluntary: Mors et Resurrectio (Jean Langlais) From Trois Paraphrases Gregoriennes   Hymn in Procession: Jesus Christ Is Risen Today (Tune: Easter Hymn)   Psalm: 118: 1-2, 14-24 "O Give Thanks Unto the Lord for He is Good" (Confitemini Domino) Setting in B-flat by George Thalben Ball   Anthem: Christ Our Passover (Will C. MacFarlane)   Hymn: The Day of Resurrection (Tune: Lancashire)   Anthem at the Offertory: Sing Ye To the Lord (Edward Cuthbert Bairstow) Doxology: "Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow" (Lasst Uns Erfreuen)   Hymn: Christ the Lord is Risen Today (Tune: Llanfair)   Organ Voluntary: Toccata from Symphonie V (Charles Marie Widor)   Easter musicians included: The Plaza Presbyterian Church Chancel Choir and eight soloists Brass Quartet and Tympanist     A small personal note: we donned our new choir vestments, black cassocks = and Cathedral length cottas, for the first time today which were exceptionally =   well received. All went very well, and I hope that all of my friends and colleagues had a wonderful and blessed Easter season as well.   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: New Trumpet Stop (crosspost) From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 07:26:16 +0100   I understand there is some surprising information on a new trumpet stop to complement the Tuba Magna - rather similar to a 'Trompette Militaire' perhaps.   If you do a search on Google for 'Mammoth Trumpet' you can read all about it.   Cheers,   Bruce Miles   mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk      
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Buffalo From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 00:42:29 -0500   Felix Hell will be presenting a concert at the State University at Buffalo (NY) on April 5th at 8 PM in the Slee Concert Hall on the Amherst campus.   The organ is a III/59 1990 FISK (Opus 95).   This organ can be heard on the first selection of the current ( #0213) program of Pipedreams Http://www.pipedreams.org   The specs for the organ are located at Http://www.cbfisk.com Opus 95   This seems to be a very exciting organ and is certainly a very exciting organist !   Hope to see you there !       Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY      
(back) Subject: Re: Compton Organs (Repost) From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 09:38:53 +0100   (This is mostly a repost to a thread a few days ago -the first copy seems = to have gone adrift)     Hello all,   Compton built both straight and theatre organs, indeed many of them straddled the boundary between the two types.   His theatre organs were much nearer this middle ground than a typical Wurlitzer, and had a good 'solid' Diapason - not the stringy thing which W used, the strings were less stringy and the Tibias not quite as bland. The whole organ was less orchestral and rather more 'organ like'. The reeds = are usually excellent but very 'English' in character. I must say W did = produce the better Voxs, but Compton Tubas, Trumpets, Clarinets etc are second to none. Other distinctive features, metal Tibias - all-electric very prompt action - second touch on stop tabs and pistons - nice chunky stop tabs.   His straight organs were sometimes totally enclosed, often had horseshoe stop tab consoles and usually featured very well excecuted extension. From the 30s he often used 'push-on push-off' illuminated stop knobs - a = fore-runner of the modern electronic. He also introduced some of the first electronic instruments in the mid-thirties , first as add-ons to conventional pipe theatre organs (the Melotone) then as self- contained instruments (Electrone). These used electrostatic tone generators - in contrast to Hammond who used electro-magnet generators. The factory was destroyed during the war.     The 'Russell Holmes at the Solihull Compton' CD is excellent and a very typical Compton theatre sound - you can get it from http://www.leemingj.demon.co.uk/orderform.html Also for a straight organ Compton sound see http://www.theorganmag.com/New_CD_Reviews/new_cd_reviews_1100-4-downside.ht= m For info on many of the Compton organs extant in UK and info on the firm see http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/npor.html . One of the largest dual-purpose organs is at Southamptom Guildhall qv. on the NPOR For a pic of an illuminated stop knob console see http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/pic.exe?rec_index=3DN11620&no=3D1   Regards   Bruce Miles     mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk ----- Original Message ----- From: <Cremona502@cs.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 25, 2002 12:23 AM Subject: Re: Two Compton Organs     > Colin, > Can you describe basically what distinguishes Comptom from the others. I've > never seen one of his instruments in any form, and wondered if you might > share some of their unique points. > > Thanky. > > > Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi > < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + > http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely > >