PipeChat Digest #2804 - Saturday, April 13, 2002
 
Re: Thrill with a Trill [was: This is a Test]
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: Thrill with a Trill [was: This is a Test]
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Re: Felix Hell in Florida. Concert Announcments
  by "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com>
Re: Felix Hell in Florida. Concert Announcments
  by "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com>
What I did on my Easter 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
The thumb piston issue
  by "Steve Gilson" <sgilson@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Thrill with a Trill [was: This is a Test] From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2002 18:20:12 -0400   That's cool if they're adjacent. But, what if they're an octave or more apart? <g>     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, April 12, 2002 6:13 PM Subject: Thrill with a Trill [was: This is a Test]     > > > Dennis wrote: [snip] > > this new piece I'm trying to play requires two notes to > be played at the same time on the foot pedals, and the BC only allows = for > one to be played at a time. Any suggestions? > > << Hi Dennis, > I figger if you do a smokin trill between the two notes, nobody will > realize you aren't playing em both at the same time. :-) >> > > Mike > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Thrill with a Trill [was: This is a Test] From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2002 18:42:19 -0400   In that case, have a friend attending the recital create some sort of a diversion when you reach that particular pedal section. If the ruse is clever enough the attendees won't even notice a few missing notes here and there.. If that is unsucessful, loudly berate the registrants and the page turner.   <g>   "V. David Barton" wrote: > > That's cool if they're adjacent. But, what if they're an octave or more > apart? <g> > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Friday, April 12, 2002 6:13 PM > Subject: Thrill with a Trill [was: This is a Test] > > > > > > > Dennis wrote: [snip] > > > > this new piece I'm trying to play requires two notes to > > be played at the same time on the foot pedals, and the BC only allows = for > > one to be played at a time. Any suggestions? > > > > << Hi Dennis, > > I figger if you do a smokin trill between the two notes, = nobody > will > > realize you aren't playing em both at the same time. :-) >> > > > > Mike > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell in Florida. Concert Announcments From: "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com> Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2002 18:40:06 -0400   need more details---ticket prices--availibility at the door--approx. location of chapel-coming from melbourne   ed mc callum   On Fri, 12 Apr 2002 18:01:36 +0200 (CEST) Hell-Concerts@t-online.de writes: > Dear listmembers, > > this is to announce upcoming Felix Hell's concerts in Florida. > > St. Petersburg > First Presbyterian Church > Sunday, April 14, 3 pm > > Orlando > Chapel of Rollins College > Tuesday, April 16, 7:30 pm > > If you are in the area, please join us and > share with us our excitement about the > king of the instruments. > > Hans-Friedrich Hell > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell in Florida. Concert Announcments From: "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com> Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2002 18:40:06 -0400   need more details---ticket prices--availibility at the door--approx. location of chapel-coming from melbourne   ed mc callum   On Fri, 12 Apr 2002 18:01:36 +0200 (CEST) Hell-Concerts@t-online.de writes: > Dear listmembers, > > this is to announce upcoming Felix Hell's concerts in Florida. > > St. Petersburg > First Presbyterian Church > Sunday, April 14, 3 pm > > Orlando > Chapel of Rollins College > Tuesday, April 16, 7:30 pm > > If you are in the area, please join us and > share with us our excitement about the > king of the instruments. > > Hans-Friedrich Hell > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: What I did on my Easter 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2002 20:04:29 -0500   Easter 2, Year A   St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida   Service music Willan Prelude: 3 toccatas for keyboard/manuals: Toccata in A - Pietro Domenico Paradies (1710 - 1792) Sonata in D: Allegro con moto - P. Franz Schnizer (1740 - 1785) Fantasia No. 1 in D - Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 - 1767) Processional Hymn: At the Lamb's high feast we raise (Salzburg) - H 174 Sequence Hymn: O sons and daughters let us sing (O filii et filiae) - H 206/insert Offertory Hymn: How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord (Lyons) - H 637 Music during Communion: Settings of How firm a foundation (Foundation; text 636) Closing Hymn: Lord Christ, when first thou cam'st to earth (Mit freuden zart) - H 598 Postlude: Pomp & Circumstance Military March No. 4 - E. Elgar (1857-1934)   What a fabulous weekend! I have not yet recovered. However, as I write this, I have experienced the most horrible Friday I remember in ages, and am trying somehow to recall the utter magic and wonder of the weekend to relate to you after the harrowing day and week and the very unpleasant staff meeting that transpired this afternoon.   My dear acquaintance Massimo Nosetti made a stop in the tiny town of DeFuniak this past weekend, in order to do up a recital for us on Sunday afternoon. Friday afternoon I left early for the Panama City Beach Airport to retrieve him. After fighting spring break and rush hour traffic and having my vehicle searched at the airport, I pulled up to a 30-minute parking spot in front of the airport at 4:55 p.m., just as his plane was scheduled to land. However, no plane and no Massimo. After waiting for about twenty minutes, I went to the ticket counter and was informed that the plane had not left Atlanta. Bummer, I thought. So I called Rick and, sure enough, there was a message from Massimo that the plane had "broke" in Atlanta.   So I did something I had never done before - I walked into the airport lounge alone and ordered a beer. After one, I decided to approach the ticket counter again to glean info regarding the expected arrival - another hour and a half. So I went back to the lounge and had another. Some guy waiting for his girlfriend joined me, and we engaged in conversation during the afternoon news.   After the buzz was gone, the plane arrived, and there he was, resplendent in suit and tie. By the time we retrieved luggage, we knew it would be too late once we arrived home to grill, and all the steakhouses were full. So what did I do - I took him to Olive Garden, an "Italian" restaurant! (Yet another thing I swore I would never do.) We had the most delightful dinner, albeit not authentic at all (apparently they don't do parmagiana with chicken, only eggplant, and swordfish is not plentiful).   We arrived home well after 10:30, so I let him sleep in the next morning. While Rick made plans to assemble his new grill and ride his Harley, we betook ourselves to Crestview to meet Leon Curenton and to see the circa-1978 Kenneth Jones organ at First United Methodist Church (stop list found at http://www.pensacola-ago.org). It was interesting in that the modern building coupled with the carpeted floors really stemmed the tide of sound starting a third of the way back in the church. But a gorgeous little instrument, and well voiced - I would love to have one myself.   After lunch with Leon (no local color, because our favorite local restaurant was not open on Saturdays, and the other local exudes cholesterol and triglycerides from the doorway), we returned to DeFuniak for Massimo to practice and for me to print the programme. Our church had purchased a new copier, which quit during the copying of the programmes. So I found a churchmember accountant who was working on Saturday, and borrowed his copier. That evening we enjoyed my famous zuppa, grilled steaks with broccoli, carrots, hollandaise sauce, trimmings and excellent Hungarian wine. Warm rice pudding with cream and Italian (real Italian) coffee finished the evening.   The service on Sunday went well, except that I could not bribe Massimo to play the postlude, so he had to suffer through mine. His recital program included:   Ouverture and fugue in C major, KV 399 - Mozart Voluntary, op. 6 n. 2 - Stanley Toccata, adagio and fugue in C major, BWV 564 - Bach Andante and Gavotta - Samuel Wesley Introduzione, tema con variazioni e finale, op. 11 - Morandi Andante with variations in D major - Mendelssohn Sonata in F major - Pergolesi Canterbury March - Perrin Suite Francaise: Nazard - Langlais Alleluia - Rosetta   When I first saw this program, I sighed to myself, "Oh, no - a bunch of baroque lollipops." However, I was very pleasantly surprised - this was one of the most delightful programs we have enjoyed at St. Agatha's. Massimo had come up with very colorful, exciting, sparkling and doable registrations, and every moment was sheer pleasure.   It was one of the first times that I had the leisure to actually sit and watch another organist. I felt guilty, because the recital attendees fight over the best places to sit to "see" the action, and there I was next to him turning pages. However, my page turning services were only needed sporadically, and I was able to observe. He played at perfect ease, with an elastic perfection and economy of movement. I had never heard this particular Mendelssohn before, and truly loved it. I feel that Felix and I would have been lovers in a past life if only I had been his type. The Langlais and Rosetta were simply marvelous, Massimo stating to me that I had a perfect Neapolitan Nazard. The Bach was played at less than full organ, and truly sizzled.   His encore was "A Fancy" by William Harris - a gorgeous little gem that I instantly loved.   After one of our extreme receptions, we returned to my humble abode, where I had invited friends Leon Curenton and J.O. Love to join us for dinner. They enjoyed appetizers of smoked salmon and havarti while strolling the grounds, until called in for a dinner of roast with carrots and potatoes, green beans, cranberry salad, my famous chef salad, cole slaw (a moment of insanity on my part) and lots of surprises. Beer, wine, the inevitable Southern iced tea and coffee were served. Guests had a choice between leftover rice pudding, coconut cake or strawberry/pineapple shortcake for dessert. One of my favorite things is to sit around a table eating, drinking and visiting with good friends, and we talked about another favorite subject - organs.   As a gift Massimo provided us with copies of his newest CD, not yet released in the U.S. Entitled "L'Orgue de Concert" (Vol. 3), he performed Franck, Widor, Reger, Jongen, Weitz, Yon, Rota, and Ducommun at l'orgue Ayer de l'eglise d'Ursy, Suisse. Now this is a neat organ, and sounded really interesting. Containing 29 stops and two manuals, and having two consoles, it is literally one of the most colorful organs I have seen. Quoting the program notes, "This is the first non mechanical action in history to directly control the opening of a pipe organ's pallets in direct proportion to the movement of the keys." It is an amazing little Romantic organ, sounding much larger than it is.   Monday afternoon I reluctantly chauffered Massimo to the Pensacola Airport, so that he could travel to New Orleans for further recital. I had discussed with him the economy, which has seemed to affect the engaging of organists for recitals over here. I had tried previously to interest other area venues with hosting Massimo and Felix Hell, and ran into tales of financial woes all around. But I'm such a spendthrift anyway, and I'd rather spend some of my own money and beg others to spend theirs on recitals than watch the investors whittle it away. So far it has been well worth it for all of us.   Well, I do go on, so I will mercifully quit for now.   Sincerely,   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: The thumb piston issue From: "Steve Gilson" <sgilson@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2002 22:03:05 -0400   Hello all,   As far as dream consoles go, I have played a small Austin in Pine Point, Maine, two man, twenty odd stops, some of the best unification I've seen in a while, and 12 generals! Compared to the 4 generals I was used to on an old English Hill, Norman Beard 3/36 that I used to play, it was a dream...   One thing I would insist on would be Divisional Cancels. A simple wide button above the drawknobs on each jamb, or a bar above tabs is great, especially if = you goof with one of your million thumps pistons and need to do a quick reset of only = one manual. The option to exchange the Great and Choir manuals and pistons is great too, especially if you do a lot of Solo work that alternates between the choir and swell...those few inches that you don't have to swing your right arm up and down can = make all the difference.   Steve Gilson Organist and Choirmaster St Andrew's, St. Lambert Quebec