PipeChat Digest #3011 - Monday, August 5, 2002
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #3000 - 08/03/02
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: The organ in Ron's church
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: the cost of a pipe organ
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
RE: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Organ Service; pipe and electronic
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Organ Service; pipe and electronic
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Irish mist
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Music stores, NYC?
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Cost of used instruments
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Cost of pipe organ
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: recycling pipes
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: space for a pipe organ
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Schlicker Co. for sale?
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Cost of used instruments
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Schlicker Co. for sale?
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Red Faced Again
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
RE: The organ in Ron's church
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Cost of used instruments
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Cost of used instruments
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3000 - 08/03/02 From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 10:20:59 +1200   Russ,   You cannot accuse me of not trying to get the best out of this thing. I spent many hours on the Allen before agreeing to play for a service on it. As on any instrument, I'm always experimenting with registration etc. and keenly encourage other folk to play in front of me, to see what they do = and how it sounds. And this, for me, is my practice with any kind of instrument, pipe, electronic or reed.   Some instruments, both pipe and reed, need constant maintenance. Some = others do not. Two stories, not to be taken as political statements of any kind!   1. Way back in 1962/3 I was organist of a church that had a 10-year-old valve drawbar 61/25 Hammond. Over the summer holidays, when the church = would not be used at all for three weeks, I left th Hammond going, hoping it = would burn out. It didn't. Now, almost exactly 40 years later, the thing is = still in perfect order and has never ever had any maintenance since it was purchased. 2. In 1872 a church here bought a NZ-made tracker organ with detached reversed console. 2 manuals, about 15 rks. In 1962, the church was in bad straits and organ maintenance and tuning ceased. In 1973 I took over maintenance and tuning, gratis, and found on my first visit that only the Oboe needed a decent tune, though it was still quite useable. Of the = flues, only a handful of trebles were out of tune. Extraordinary. Mind you, the church had not been heated once in all those years. Now, 2002, 130 years after that organ was built, there has still been no major repair work done and nothing that could be called a restoration like re-leathering etc., merely the occasional bit of dirt in a reed or very occasional replacement of a tracker button taking five minutes. The organ is by a NZ builder = called Jenkins, the firm dying out about 80 years ago.   As I say, no political agenda here. Just two instruments that seem to defy what others need.   Ross   > Of course, I've >taken the trouble to know how it works and to know how to get the most = >out >of it which you clearly haven't bothered to do. I'm sorry you've had a = bad >experience with Allen. Mine has been absolutely opposite.        
(back) Subject: Re: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 17:57:23 EDT   Dear Ross:   The name Jones is Welsh.   Ron  
(back) Subject: RE: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 17:15:35 -0500   But Kenneth Jones is Irish, is he not?   -----Original Message----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com [mailto:RonSeverin@aol.com] Sent: Monday, August 05, 2002 4:57 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice     Dear Ross:   The name Jones is Welsh.   Ron   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 10:41:33 +1200   Sure, but is that organbuilder from Wales? I don't think so.   Make a very silly comparison. McDonalds make edible (not palatable, = though, IMO) cardboard. Ask the the MacDonalds in Scotland if that makes the = outfit a Scots eatery and imagine the reaction you'll get.   :-) :-) :-) Ross     >Dear Ross: > >The name Jones is Welsh. > >Ron      
(back) Subject: Re: The organ in Ron's church From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 18:23:15 EDT   Dear Bud:   You are absolutely right, that organ sounds much better than it really deserves to. Over a period of time, the tuner and I have revoiced the principals and flutes softer. The trick was to voice the digital stops to match, which they did. The sound is RC/Anglican. I had a visitor soon after it was all in and voiced, asking where that marvelous state trumpet and 32' pedal bombard were located. I smiled and said very carefully located, they're digital! He walked away as another convert. If you knew how we engineered the acoustics to sound natural, you'd first laugh your sides out, and then telephone Rome that you had indeed experienced a MIRACLE of great magnitude. The room is as dead as Tutankkaman, but you'd never know that it was. It's shear genius. Don De Puy gets all the credit on that one. This organ is 6 ranks of pipes and 54 ranks of digital. The sound is as full and rich as any million dollar cathedral organ in an alive building.   I love challenges,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: the cost of a pipe organ From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 15:22:00 -0500   On 8/3/02 10:18 PM, quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > The advice I got: forget ANYTHING beyond METAL pipes. Older British > organs do NOT transplant well from their cool, damp churches to > overheated, dry American churches. In other words, if you like the SOUND > of an organ, buy it, but discard the MECHANISM and all the WOODEN pipes > (including those WONDERFUL 16' Open Woods) and essentially build a new > chassis for the recycled metal pipes and replace the wooden pipes, or > the wood will split and crack in the environment of an American church > with central heat and air.   In Winnipeg, we've found that advice to be almost as true for new organs = as used ones. Several major installations have had problems with chests, = wooden pipes, etc. Of course, our climate is very dry AND our churches centrally heated and lacking humidity. Early Japanese pianos suffered the same fate here but they've managed to solve their problems now.   TTFN, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: RE: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 17:32:35 -0500   Kenneth Jones is reputedly an Irish organbuilder.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Service; pipe and electronic From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:04:11 -0400   Nobody ever purchased a pipe organ because it was easier to care for. They chose a pipe organ for a myriad of other reasons.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Service; pipe and electronic From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:01:14 -0400   Nobody ever purchased a pipe organ because it was easier to care for. They chose a pipe organ for a myriad of other reasons.  
(back) Subject: Irish mist From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 00:09:50 +0100     Hello,   Glenda is absolutely right of course.....but who are "the associates" ?   More importantly, where are they?   It's a misty,murky world sometimes...........   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     -----Original Message-----   Subject: RE: A slice of Klais...Wood be nice   Kenneth Jones is reputedly an Irish organbuilder.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com           "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Music stores, NYC? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:12:17 -0400   Patelsons, behind Carnegie Hall (56th Street) Take the N or R train to 57th Street  
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:15:40 -0400   You may have missed my point. Why is it that everybody bemoans the cost of new instruments, yet refuses = to purchase and restore magnificent antiques for a fraction of the cost? Organists will buy recordings of Hooks, Skinners, Roosevelts, and the = like, and pay a great deal of money to go on convention junkets to hear = them and see them, but when it comes time to saving them, they want a new, = flashy, and as you stated, "untested" instrument, or a much larger fake = with all the gadgets. Once again, it is disdain within our own ranks that may be destroying the = pipe organ.  
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of pipe organ From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:18:21 -0400   If one can shop for a vintage pipe organ, one can shop for a builder.  
(back) Subject: Re: recycling pipes From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:19:04 -0400   It's simple. Go hear a large revoicing job by the builder in question. They may even have before and after recordings.  
(back) Subject: Re: space for a pipe organ From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 19:23:01 -0400   Winding down my vacation in Hawaii, my General Manager and Foreman just = told me that we had signed a contract for a new pipe organ. The room seats fifty people. The ceilings are about eleven feet. It will replace a substitute by the largest of the substitute = manufacturers. The client got what they wanted: a pipe organ.  
(back) Subject: Schlicker Co. for sale? From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 19:57:18 EDT   Greetings, Was this the list that reported that the Schlicker Organ Company was for sale? Details? Archived yet? Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 17:34:40 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> > The name of the game here really is spendable income. During the > heyday of Large organ factories, and assembly line efficiency, most > states had no income tax, and in 1950-51 the tax rate was 1 1/2 %. > The war WWII was paid for by war bonds not taxes. Tax and spend has literally dried up > expendable income for charitable, or church venues except for a very > few who are able to shelter their wealth. > Big government has stolen = your church's pipe organ. Make no mistake about > it.   Oh dear.   If that figure seems suspect, it's because it is. According to figures = from the Congressional Joint Committee on taxation, the 1950 rate was 17.4% on income up to $4,000 and the maximum rate was 91% on income over $400,000. = In 1951 the minimum rate went up to 20.4%. And yes, during WWII, minimum = rates went from 10% to 19% to 23%.   Look elsewhere for organ theft.   Michael Fox      
(back) Subject: Re: Schlicker Co. for sale? From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 20:35:39 -0400     --------------A5E7B4FC4D376726EDE6BFE5 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote:   > Greetings, > Was this the list that reported that the Schlicker Organ Company was for > sale? > Details? > Archived yet? > Stan Krider   Hi Stan, I did not understand that Schlicker was for sale, only that they had ceased operations. Ken List seems to have been the first to report it on Piporg-L, and I have pasted in his post for you. Hope this helps.   Mike     >   Subject: Breaking up - and some sad news Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 22:27:42 -0400 From: "Ken W. List" <list440@earthlink.net> To: PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu         Dear LIST -   Having railed against the practise of above-top-of-2' pipes, I must confess that I, too have encountered 1-1/3' stops which did not break (Schlicker did a couple of times) and also at least one 1-3/5' Tierce which remained unbroken - that in the 1931 EMSkinner Swell at Severance Hall. Frankly however, these highest pipes were so weak and puny and unsteady that we chose to V I O L A T E our obligations as conservators and broke back from top g#-57 on; making the break at 3-1/5/ pitch which is a pretty normal way to do this.   What I also have NOT seen/heard/ nor care to were Septiemes or Siffloetes which did not break. I think our practical organ-builders on the LIST agree that such wee pipes are, generally speaking, sheer folly. Personally, I cannot for a minute believe that the musical delight of any solo registration is so compromised by an octave break back as Mr. McKinley suggests - although his reference has a most novel ring. I should think that breaking to some other mutation pitch other than the concordant sub-octave of the mutation being broken would be far more musically disturbing, if in fact this de-delightening effect can truly be perceived by the average listener (and maybe even some above-averagre listeners!!) as readily as is claimed. Nevertheless -   I received a communiqu=E9 copy today announcing, somewhat after the fact, that as of June 10th, 2002, at 12:00 noon the Herman L. Schlicker Organ Company of Buffalo has permanently ceased all operations, and in fact no longer exists. It was suggested that the firm will not ever exist again. (This was the final "version" of the Schlicker Organ Co. Inc. which was headed by Herman Schlicker until his death in the 1970's, and was the firm for which I worked for a long, long time.) I cannot but be saddened by this news, for reasons as much sentimental as musical, at least in the past tense sense; but I must express my belief that it was time that the firm be put to rest, it having (in my opinion, mind you) so departed from the concepts and ideals of its founder as to be unrecognizable by him.   It does represent, however, the passing of another important firm-name in the history of American Organbuilding.   Uncompleted Schlicker contracts are to be finished in the facilities of a Milwaukee organization, according to the announcement.   Ken List   :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual con- tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the Uni- versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail to listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the web page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html . ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::         --------------A5E7B4FC4D376726EDE6BFE5 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>Greetings, <br>Was this the list that reported that the Schlicker Organ Company was for <br>sale? <br>Details? <br>Archived yet? <br>Stan Krider</blockquote>   <p>Hi Stan, <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I did not understand that Schlicker was for sale, only that they had ceased operations. Ken List seems to have been the = first to report it on Piporg-L, and I have pasted in his post for you. Hope this helps. <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mike <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>&nbsp;</blockquote> <font color=3D"#3333FF">Subject:</font> <br><font = color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Breaking up - and some sad news</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Date:</font> <br><font = color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mon, 24 Jun 2002 22:27:42 -0400</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp; From:</font> <br><font = color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; "Ken W. List" &lt;list440@earthlink.net></font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; To:</font> <br><font = color=3D"#3333FF">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font>&nbsp; <br><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font>&nbsp; <br><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font>&nbsp;<font color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">Dear LIST -</font><font = color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">Having railed against the practise of = above-top-of-2' pipes, I must</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">confess that I, too have encountered 1-1/3' = stops which did not break</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">(Schlicker did a couple of times) and also at least one 1-3/5' Tierce</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">which remained unbroken - that in the 1931 = EMSkinner Swell at Severance</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">Hall.&nbsp; Frankly however, these highest = pipes were so weak and puny and</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">unsteady that we chose to V I O L A T E our = obligations as conservators</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">and broke back from top g#-57 on; making the break at 3-1/5/ pitch which</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">is a pretty normal way to do this.</font><font = color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">What I also have NOT seen/heard/ nor care to = were Septiemes or</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">Siffloetes which did not break. I think our = practical organ-builders on</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">the LIST agree that such wee pipes are, = generally speaking, sheer</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">folly.&nbsp; Personally, I cannot for a minute believe that the musical</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">delight of any solo registration is so = compromised by an octave break</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">back as Mr. McKinley suggests - although his reference has a most novel</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">ring.&nbsp; I should think that breaking to = some other mutation pitch other</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">than the concordant sub-octave of the mutation being broken would be far</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">more musically disturbing, if in fact this = de-delightening effect can</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">truly be perceived by the average listener = (and maybe even some</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">above-averagre listeners!!) as readily as is claimed.&nbsp; Nevertheless -</font><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">I received a communiqu&eacute; copy today = announcing, somewhat after the fact,</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">that as of June 10th, 2002, at 12:00 noon the Herman L. Schlicker Organ</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">Company of Buffalo has permanently ceased all operations, and in fact no</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">longer exists.&nbsp; It was suggested that the firm will not ever exist</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">again. (This was the final "version" of the = Schlicker Organ Co. Inc.</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">which was headed by Herman Schlicker until his death in the 1970's, and</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">was the firm for which I worked for a long, = long time.)&nbsp; I cannot but be</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">saddened by this news, for reasons as much = sentimental as musical, at</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">least in the past tense sense;&nbsp; but I = must express my belief that it was</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">time that the firm be put to rest, it having (in my opinion, mind you)</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">so departed from the concepts and ideals of = its founder as to be</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">unrecognizable by him.</font><font = color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">It does represent, however, the passing of = another important firm-name</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">in the history of American = Organbuilding.</font><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">Uncompleted Schlicker contracts are to be = finished in the facilities of</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">a Milwaukee organization, according to the = announcement.</font><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font color=3D"#3333FF">Ken List</font><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font> <p><font = color=3D"#3333FF">:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::= :::::::::::::::</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">Note:&nbsp; opinions&nbsp; expressed on = PIPORG-L are those of the&nbsp; individual con-</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">tributors and not necessarily&nbsp; those of the list owners&nbsp; nor of the Uni-</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">versity at Albany.&nbsp; For a brief&nbsp; = summary of list&nbsp; commands, send mail to</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">listserv@listserv.albany.edu&nbsp; = saying&nbsp; GET LSVCMMDS.TXT&nbsp; or see&nbsp; the&nbsp; web</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF">page at <A = HREF=3D"http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html">http://www.albany.edu= /piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html</A> ..</font> <br><font = color=3D"#3333FF">:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::= :::::::::::::::</font> <br><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font>&nbsp; <br><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font>&nbsp; <br><font color=3D"#3333FF"></font>&nbsp;</html>   --------------A5E7B4FC4D376726EDE6BFE5--    
(back) Subject: Red Faced Again From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 20:47:10 -0400   Dear List, I apologize for posting my last message to the Pipechat list. It was intended as a private message to Stan, but the address header became confused when I did some copy/paste operations. I promise to pay more attention to the address I'm sending to from now on. Mike    
(back) Subject: RE: The organ in Ron's church From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 01:55:54 +0100   Hello,   This has to be my last posting before I depart for continental Europe.   I do not wish to open the debate about electronic v. pipes yet again, = but I think Ron has just confirmed my recent observation about very dead = rooms.   Digital wizardry enables the importation of a synthesised acoustic and = the sound of pipes within that acoustic.....that's the secret ingredient = in the success of digital organs in living spaces and absorbent = buildings.   A far cry fom my ageing reverb spring and leslie speakers!   In fact, I have only ever heard ONE really successful pipe organ in a = living space....a tiny cabinet organ (completely enclosed, save for = small grills) dating from the early 18th century in Holland. The = un-nicked pipework was of almost Dulciana scale, with tiny little = stopped wooden pipes for flutes...a gem.   Unfortunately, this delicate style of scaling and voicing would never be = heard in a large, absorbent space.   It reminds me of a reputed story (which may or may not be true), that = Arthur Harrison was known to reject venues where the acoustic he = regarded as unsuitable.   I guess there really isn't a solution short of amplification and/or = synthesised reverberation.........Wurlitzer (and others) got around the = problem with heavy wind and heavy nicking, and they were right to do so!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         -----Original Message----- From: "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> Subject: Re: The organ in Ron's church   Ron wrote:-   You are absolutely right, that organ sounds much better than it really deserves to. Over a period of time, the tuner and I have revoiced the principals and flutes softer. The trick was to voice the digital stops to match, which they did. .............   If you knew how we engineered the acoustics to sound natural, you'd first laugh your sides out.......   The room is as dead as Tutankkaman, but you'd never know that it was.=20   The sound is as full and rich as any million dollar cathedral organ in an alive building........            
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 21:18:10 -0400   > If that figure seems suspect, it's because it is. According to figures = from > the Congressional Joint Committee on taxation, the 1950 rate was 17.4% = on > income up to $4,000 and the maximum rate was 91% on income over = $400,000. In > 1951 the minimum rate went up to 20.4%. And yes, during WWII, minimum = rates > went from 10% to 19% to 23%. > > Look elsewhere for organ theft.   Michael, You forget about the bite taken by individual state income tax and FICA (social security, medicare, etc). Oh, and by the way, most of us in the = US pay hefty health insurance premiums each pay period. And not to mention = 401k if we want anything besides below-poverty level retirement income from the =   aforementioned Social Security. (Although with the current stock market, = it looks like that's a joke on us!)   The truth is that after all this was deducted from my paycheck, my = take-home pay was 52% of the original salary figure. Disposable income? What's = that? Of course, now I'm unemployed since I used to work for WorldCom. (chuckle) =     Cheers, TommyLee Whitlock Bitter? You bet!    
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 21:18:13 EDT   Dear Michael:   Now you're quoting the rich. No ordinary worker made any where near $4,000 during tha era. It was the "RICH"! The average worker brought home $18.00 a week less than $1,000 a year. You must be from a rich family. Those were depression and post depression times. The average Joe didn't pay more than 1 1/2% because he didn't make that much. My first teaching job in 1967 paid $3,300 per year, but a = family of four could live on $20.00 per week on food. Monthly rent on a one bedroom apt. was a wopping $87.50 per month. We were always better dressed at church too because we didn't dare get our clothes dirty, but we didn't want anyone to know we were poor. We hid it very well. $4,000 a year people drove Buicks and Cadillacs. We arrived at church in a 1940 Hudson and hid it in the farthest space in the parking lot. It dripped oil and we parked in a different space each week to spread out the oil stains. My father was a baker with a soft heart. He's still alive at 86. Must be God smiled on him.   Ron Severin