PipeChat Digest #3017 - Wednesday, August 7, 2002
 
Re: Great antique Pipe organ
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: cost of organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Great antique Pipe organ
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Cost of used instruments
  by "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com>
Re: Cost of used instruments
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Great antique Pipe organ
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Great antique Pipe organ(GOOD EAR)
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Wrong numbers (was: Cost of used instruments)
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3000 - 08/03/02
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Pipes vs. Electroids
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Pipes vs. Electroids
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The "trouble" with pipe organs?
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: Organ music
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: The WurliTzer
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3000 - 08/03/02
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Great antique Pipe organ From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 13:16:16 +1200   Not really quite as cut and dried as you make it sound. I can certainly = tell if chest construction is good, and have never been an organbuilder. OK, = that sounds arrogant. Let's look at a few things here, making up the following, being merely illustrative...   I look at the upperboards. Of good quality timber, not composition board = but solid mahogany, straight grain and deep red, over an inch thick. I look at the pipe holes: nothing burred, nothing off centre, clearly have been "scorched" with the special tool for smoothing the hole. No evidence in = the screws of the upper boards ever having been removed. No evidence of re-racking or changes in specification. Conveyances for off-chest basses = are of good materials and not damaged. The chest is deep enough to carry sufficicent wind for the size of the chest. The size is big enough for the stops planted on it - not much likelihood of robbing there, as I can see = the pallet-size as well through the wind-trunk entry hole(s). The drawstop mechanism is of sensible design and, pushing by hand, I can see of good order still. Yes, that tells me, the sliders moving easily but with no sloppiness or sideways movement, that the chest has not sagged, and that = the insides were well-made. I tweak down a few pulldowns under the chest, listening carefully to the noise the pallet makes, making educated guesses about the state of the leather surfacing and the adequacy of the pallet size. From this I can feel the quality of the pallet springs as well. OK here.   There's more. But so far I've spent only ten minutes looking at the = outside of the chest and have undone not one screw, yet I'm willing to put money = on it tjhat the chest in pretty good nick. Sure, this imaginary chest may possibly have runnings and major cracks , but from what I've said that is unlikely, and very likely is easily restorable.   Taking all those factors into account, and looking at all other things = like console, winding, blower, close look at pipes, etc.etc. a Good Ear can certainly tell you all kinds of things that are important. No one but a builder? I don't think so.   If the upperboards were of cheap material, the chest was not a slider one, the conveyancing was poor and was loose, there was evidence of rackboards having been altered, there were veneers over the upperboards, stop action looked odd and leather was cracking, upperboards were thin, pulldowns were rusty and/or bent, rack pillars were cheap-looking, there was evidence of borer, electrification wiring was not properly held : then, in this case, I'd say, "Get the hell out of there, fast."   Problems with this?   >Ross >your notes about organs are good, except. No one but a builder >can determine if chest construcion is good. For that matter, what >is "good chest construction"? The only way to see what a chest is >like is to open it up, and look inside. Also, not all chests >that look alike are equal.      
(back) Subject: Re: cost of organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 20:03:03 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_01C0_01C23D84.45989480 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   One or two people have raised the concern that some pipe organ companies = =3D may be financially unstable and that churches are taking a risk when =3D they buy a pipe organ. It is certainly true that some firms have in the = =3D past proved unstable and that others may prove so in the future. There = =3D are, however, ways of avoiding this risk. If a customer is nervous, =3D it is always possible to obtain a performance bond, although obviously =3D the church will have to pay the cost of this. And if an organbuilder =3D does not readily agree to the church obtaining a performance bond, =3D choose another organbuilder.   John Speller=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_01C0_01C23D84.45989480 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4134.600" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>One or two people have raised the =3D concern that some=3D20 pipe organ companies may be financially unstable and that churches are =3D taking a=3D20 risk when they buy a pipe organ.&nbsp; It is certainly true that some =3D firms have=3D20 in the past proved unstable and that others may prove so in the =3D future.&nbsp;=3D20 There are, however, ways of avoiding this risk.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If a =3D customer=3D20 is&nbsp;nervous, it is always possible to obtain a performance bond, =3D although=3D20 obviously the church will have to pay the cost of this.&nbsp; And if = an=3D20 organbuilder does not readily agree to the church obtaining a =3D performance bond,=3D20 choose another organbuilder.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>John Speller</FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_01C0_01C23D84.45989480--    
(back) Subject: Re: Great antique Pipe organ From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 21:56:49 EDT   Case in point:   There are two 14 rank organs for sale, an E.M. Skinner three manual and an =C6olian Skinner two manual. The builder will put them in like new condition for $250,000. installed each. For someone, these hold a historical significance.=20   I did my homework, and 14 ranks in a new organ would run in the neighborhood of $240,000 to $280,000. installed. Granted neither is it a Skinner, E.M. or =C6olian. Hopefully it would be scaled and voiced for the intended room. I'm sure there are some second or third generation voicers out there who can accomplish the sound=20 you'd be looking for. I know of some current builders who can get close if not right on target.   What would be your choice all things being equal, and why? Who would you chose to build this organ?   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments From: "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 21:03:16 -0500     ------=3D_NextPart_001_0001_01C23D8C.AFFE7580 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   What in God's, Allah's, Buddah's, etc name does the following have to do = =3D with organs? Topicality please!   ----- Original Message ----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com Sent: Monday, August 05, 2002 8:20 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments   Dear Michael:   Now you're quoting the rich. No ordinary worker made any where near $4,000 during tha era. It was the "RICH"! The average worker brought home $18.00 a week less than $1,000 a year. You must be from a rich family. Those were depression and post depression times. The average Joe didn't pay more than 1 1/2% because he didn't make that much. My first teaching job in 1967 paid $3,300 per year, but a = fami=3D ly of four could live on $20.00 per week on food. Monthly rent on a one   ------=3D_NextPart_001_0001_01C23D8C.AFFE7580 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><BODY STYLE=3D3D"font:10pt verdana; border:none;"><DIV>What in = God's,=3D Allah's, Buddah's, etc name does the following have to do with = organs?&n=3D bsp; Topicality please!</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE = style=3D3D"PADD=3D ING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: = #000000=3D 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt Arial">----- = Ori=3D ginal Message -----</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt = A=3D rial; COLOR: black"><B>From:</B> RonSeverin@aol.com</DIV> <DIV = style=3D3D"F=3D ONT: 10pt Arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, August 05, 2002 8:20 PM</DIV> <DIV = =3D style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt Arial"><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org</DIV> <DIV = st=3D yle=3D3D"FONT: 10pt Arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: Cost of used = instruments</DI=3D V> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>Dear Michael:<BR><BR>Now you're quoting the rich. No = =3D ordinary worker made any where<BR>near $4,000 during tha era. It was the = =3D "RICH"! The average worker<BR>brought home $18.00 a week less than = $1,000=3D a year. You must be<BR>from a rich family. Those were depression and = pos=3D t depression times.<BR>The average Joe didn't pay more than 1 1/2% = becaus=3D e he didn't make<BR>that much. My first teaching job in 1967 paid $3,300 = =3D per year, but a family<BR>of four could live on $20.00 per week on food. = =3D Monthly rent on a one<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_001_0001_01C23D8C.AFFE7580--  
(back) Subject: Re: Cost of used instruments From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 22:28:03 EDT   In a message dated 8/6/02 10:12:38 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Ray_Ahrens@msn.com writes:   << What in God's, Allah's, Buddah's, etc name does the following have to = do with organs? Topicality please! >> It explains why I gave up teaching for a real-paying job ca. 1972 and even =   now only take sub gigs on a selective basis to supplement my income and = give me the opportunity to demonstrate all I learned about playing hymns from listening to Virgil and Fred Swann.   Next question? What does the B-3 in Hammond B-3 have to do with Vitiamin = B-12 and why is there no record of a Hammond B-12? Talk amongst yourselves, = please.  
(back) Subject: Re: Great antique Pipe organ From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 22:34:24 EDT   In a message dated 8/6/02 7:30:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jonberts@magiccablepc.com writes:   << The only way to see what a chest is like is to open it up, and look inside. Also, not all chests that look alike are equal. >> The chests with which I'm familiar are mostly made of knotty pine or cedar =   and typically contain lace doilies and knitted or crocheted throws made by =   aging female relatives who are color blind or are using up all the = leftovers in their knitting baskets. Sort of like what Jongen might have done with = yarn rather than music!   Yes, I am an a--hole, as previously determined. Fire away!  
(back) Subject: Re: Great antique Pipe organ(GOOD EAR) From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 15:20:21 +1200   Ron, Hi!   Yes, indeedy (as I'm told you people say).   It's like selling anything. 2nd-hand is not worth what it would cost to = buy it new, or to recreate it, but only what someone's prepared to pay for it. That's how I got my 5rk Positive for NZ$250. It's worth a great deal more theoretically, but I got it for that because I was the only bidder for it. Here in NZ, too, 2nd-hand organs fetch only a fraction of their real money value in comparison with new instruments.   >Dear Ross: > >Take good ear with you to look at an already dismantled organ to >inspect it. Now I've really heard it all. If someone were asking $60,000. >for this dismantled organ I'd be making an offer less a couple of zeros. >If I can't inspect an organ in playing condition, and play it myself, I'm >inclined to say thanks very much, but I'm simply not interested. Oh! >by the way I'll take it off your hands for $600.   Not knowing the organ you're referring to, in principle that's about what I'd do here. I've never heard of any 2nd-hand organ in NZ being sold for even $6,000, but have heard of a 3manual TCLewis of 25 rks being sold for $5,000. In good working order, at that.   >This is a pig in a poke. >No telling how long it's been in storage, how many mice have taken up >residence, or how badly the wooden pipes and chests have been eaten >by termites.   My description of a theoretical once-over would easily see this kind of damage. > >The Whitney Theatre organ of some note was in storage for 20 years. >They wanted $70,000 When push came to shove, it was water damaged, >termite ridden, and a sizeable rat and mice population had taken over. >This valuable organ was improperly placed in a shed with a leaky roof. >It went to the dump. Now if it was sold right away, and people had been >realistic about it's worth, this great organ would still be playing and being >enjoyed. This was a big organ. Sorrifully in the end was thrown out as junk. > >The conservators of redundant organs in storage must be made to realize >that a low offer is a good offer, and not a money making opportunity, but >a business deal.   Exactly. I bought a 6rk organ for the cost of picking it up, as no one offered for it at all, knowing it was badly-built and all the electrics = were stuffed. I succeeded in selling part of it, the console a bit else, for = the cost of my truck hire to go and get it, and have retained the pipes. The chests are junk. The owner had thought it was worth a small fortune.   >These are organs housed in barns and hay lofts and >not in central locations like a big Home Depot installation where you can >see them or even look at a pipe or two. In the UK, the organs are left in the >redundant churches, set up and playing, which is a much better deal. >At least you know for sure before paying hard cash what you are getting >yourself into. > >GOOD EAR indeed,   Is that ironical? My postulated Good Ear, of course, would from my own comments about him be deemed to know those questions I asked and be able = to assess things. There are, at least in this country, a number of people who can do that. Too, they are needed to assess the quality of new or rebuilt work before the parish will agree to pay the final payment to the builder/rebuilder. In one case where I was consultant, the builder complained ever afterwards that if he'd known I was to be the consultant, with my "nit-picking" on quality, he'd have charged twice as much or not taken the contract at all. Ha, ha, ha. In other words, he was not going to do a good job without thorough supervision.   In another organ I was called in on, to assess the electrification, I = first left all stops off, then leaned on the manual. Wheezes, pops, notes = sounding fully or partially, etc.etc.etc. That was it. I told the parish not to pay the builder till he'd dismantled the chest, repalleted it, got rid of the runnings, checked for splits and cracks, tightened the upperboards, = etc.etc. and then started to walk off. They said, "Hey, you haven't even tried the action yet." My reply was something like this, "If the chests are no good, they;'re not ready for the action. Call me back when the chests are done." Yuk.   In fact, I'm quite sure we have the same insistence on absolute quality, whatever is done. If I'm asked to assess for sale a dismantled job, I'll = do all I've suggested in this post and the last one, and a lot more. = Sometimes, I'll say, "Good. Worth $x." Sometimes I'll say, "Offer them 20% of what = they want." And I'll sometimes say, "Give it to an amateur enthusiast to take home for a hobby, it's not worth doing up, at all." I can think of the = case where a church, seating 100 and with an average congregation of about 30, wanted my opinion on a home-rebuilt WurliTzer of only 4rks - string, = tibia, diapason and vox, all of big scale and on about 6" wind. I told them not = to even think of offering cash for the organ, and not to take it as a gift. Even so, the owner thought it was worth about $12,000. I'm not sure what finally happened to it.   Regards, Ross   >Ron Severin      
(back) Subject: Re: Wrong numbers (was: Cost of used instruments) From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 20:34:59 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> > Now you're quoting the rich. No ordinary worker made any where > near $4,000 during tha era. It was the "RICH"!   I sympathize with anyone who says "What is this all about?" But just for a moment, can I insist that incorrect facts not go uncorrected?   The original statement was that in 1950-51 the income tax rate was 1-1/2%. = I pointed out that it was in fact 17.4% to 20.4% for incomes up to $4,000. = (I confess I don't know what the floor was, but it was not generous.)   That then led to a further odd statement:   >The average worker > brought home $18.00 a week less than $1,000 a year. You must be > from a rich family.   No and no. We're talking 1950-51, and the federal minimum wage was $0.75/hour, or $30/week. The average was probably double.   >Those were depression and post depression times.   No, not 1950-51. In fact the average worker was about as well off as in = the 90s.   > The average Joe didn't pay more than 1 1/2% because he didn't make > that much.   Again, no. He was paying 17.4% or whatever, though the exemptions for kids were more generous.   Sorry to take everyone's time. But wildly inaccurate figures annoy me as much as a squeaking swell shade.   Michael Fox          
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3000 - 08/03/02 From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 00:15:39 EDT     --part1_4a.f8d68a9.2a81f8eb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Having played an Allen 300C for the past 15 years and experimenting with about every combination there is, I find it adequate for the services we = have at this church, and the repertoire I play there. There were some problems =   which were pointed out to the Music Director, who was not too concerned, until one Sunday morning, nothing from the organ. This got his attention, =   and a serviceman was called. The organ had been overhauled and updated 15 =   years ago, a few months before I arrived on the scene. It seems about = half of the organ was not adequately responding, which I had previously told = the MD. It has been repaired, and people tell me "It sounds just like a Pipe Organ." I am not sure any of these people have ever heard a pipe organ. = I have proposed to the MD doing a recital some Sunday evening in one of the churches which does have a very fine pipe organ, and have our service = there that evening. At least then the congregation would have the opportunity = of actual comparison. I could go into the technicalities of the problems we = had with the Allen, but not being a technician, I probably would not explain = it properly. The main problem I see is not the organ being out of tune with itself, but the piano tuner refuses to adequately tune the piano to the organ. There is no question about the "electroid digette" being = anywhere near the sound of a pipe organ, no matter how large it is. So, why the discussions? I would rather be playing the Allen than the synthesizers = some of the churches are using now. Lee   --part1_4a.f8d68a9.2a81f8eb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Having played an Allen = 300C for the past 15 years and experimenting with about every combination = there is, I find it adequate for the services we have at this church, and = the repertoire I play there. &nbsp;There were some problems which were = pointed out to the Music Director, who was not too concerned, until one = Sunday morning, nothing from the organ. &nbsp;This got his attention, and = a serviceman was called. &nbsp;The organ had been overhauled and updated = 15 years ago, a few months before I arrived on the scene. &nbsp;It seems = about half of the organ was not adequately responding, which I had = previously told the MD. &nbsp;It has been repaired, and people tell me "It = sounds just like a Pipe Organ." &nbsp;I am not sure any of these people = have ever heard a pipe organ. &nbsp;I have proposed to the MD doing a = recital some Sunday evening in one of the churches which does have a very = fine pipe organ, and have our service there that evening. &nb   --part1_4a.f8d68a9.2a81f8eb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes vs. Electroids From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 00:28:50 EDT     --part1_4e.f8ad5b6.2a81fc02_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dennis, How I would love to have a 2M Moeller Artiste in my home, but I = live in an apartment complex and have a 2M classically registered WurliTzer = with AGO pedals. (We practically had to tear down the doors of the apartment in =   order to get it in place) . Would someone familiar with this old = WurliTzer please tell me why it is tuned a few cents lower than A440. There is no = way it can be used with my piano, unless I have the piano tuned to the organ. =   Then the instrumentalists for whom I accompany, as well as the vocalist = would all go nuts when we practiced with the piano. As I remember, this organ appears to be similar to the one on which I took lessons at the WurliTzer Music Company in Detroit in 1955. (Richard Weismeuller was the instructor, = if anyone remembers him). Lee   --part1_4e.f8ad5b6.2a81fc02_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Dennis, How I would = love to have a 2M Moeller Artiste in my home, but I live in an apartment = complex and have a 2M classically registered WurliTzer with AGO pedals. = (We practically had to tear down the doors of the apartment in order to = get it in place) &nbsp;. &nbsp;Would someone familiar with this old = WurliTzer please tell me why it is tuned a few cents lower than A440. = &nbsp;There is no way it can be used with my piano, unless I have the = piano tuned to the organ. &nbsp;Then the instrumentalists for whom I = accompany, as well as the vocalist would all go nuts when we practiced = with the piano. &nbsp;As I remember, this organ appears to be similar to = the one on which I took lessons at the WurliTzer Music Company in Detroit = in 1955. (Richard Weismeuller was the instructor, if anyone remembers = him). &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_4e.f8ad5b6.2a81fc02_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes vs. Electroids From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 07 Aug 2002 00:35:55 -0400   Lee - It sounds like a Wurlitzer 4700. There are 12 generators in that model if I remember correctly. Any competent organ tech should be able to bring the pitch up to A-440 if it is indeed that model. If it's one of the old amplified reed Wurlitzers better to tune the piano to the organ ---   tom   Chicaleee@aol.com wrote: > > Dennis, How I would love to have a 2M Moeller Artiste in my home, but > I live in an apartment complex and have a 2M classically registered > WurliTzer with AGO pedals. (We practically had to tear down the doors > of the apartment in order to get it in place) . Would someone > familiar with this old WurliTzer please tell me why it is tuned a few > cents lower than A440. There is no way it can be used with my piano, > unless I have the piano tuned to the organ. Then the instrumentalists > for whom I accompany, as well as the vocalist would all go nuts when > we practiced with the piano. As I remember, this organ appears to be > similar to the one on which I took lessons at the WurliTzer Music > Company in Detroit in 1955. (Richard Weismeuller was the instructor, > if anyone remembers him). Lee   -- Tom Hoehn, Organist http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn Tampa Theatre, Tampa, FL First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL CFTOS/Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS    
(back) Subject: Re: The "trouble" with pipe organs? From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 07 Aug 2002 04:40:20 +0000   On the one hand we have multitudes bewailing the decline of the pipe = organ, on the other pipe organ builders with waiting lists for their instruments. =   They can't both be right! John Foss   _________________________________________________________________ Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ music From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 00:55:32 EDT     --part1_1a5.65673ad.2a820244_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   While in New York last week, I chanced to wander into a small music store = on Port Washington Blvd. and asked if they had any "classical" organ music. = The owner replied that they had not had a call for organ music "for some = time." She looked in a file cabinet, and stuffed in the back was a Kalmus edition = of "South German Christmas Music" from the 16th - 18th Centuries. What was amazing was the price listed on the small book was $1.00. Of course, I purchased it -- and for $1.00. It has music by Pachelbel, Fischer, Poglietti, Murschhauser, and Kindermann. The first piece is the = Pachelbel Toccata in F Major. Lee   --part1_1a5.65673ad.2a820244_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>While in New York last = week, I chanced to wander into a small music store on Port Washington = Blvd. and asked if they had any "classical" organ music. &nbsp;The owner = replied that they had not had a call for organ music "for some time." = &nbsp;She looked in a file cabinet, and stuffed in the back was a Kalmus = edition of "South German Christmas Music" from the 16th - 18th Centuries. = &nbsp;What was amazing was the price listed on the small book was $1.00. = &nbsp;Of course, I purchased it -- and for $1.00. &nbsp;It has music by = Pachelbel, Fischer, Poglietti, Murschhauser, &nbsp;and Kindermann. = &nbsp;The first piece is the Pachelbel Toccata in F Major. = &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a5.65673ad.2a820244_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: The WurliTzer From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 01:03:53 EDT     --part1_a4.2a109554.2a820439_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Tom,   Thanks for your information. It is one of the old amplified reed organs which my son wired through stereo speakers, thus eliminating the need for = the large speaker cabinet. (I sold it for more than I paid for the organ and cabinet). I will continue to have my piano tuned to A-440. My keyboard = had variable tuning, so it can be tuned to the organ. That solves the problem =   for now. Lee   --part1_a4.2a109554.2a820439_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Tom, <BR> <BR>Thanks for your information. &nbsp;It is one of the old amplified reed = organs which my son wired through stereo speakers, thus eliminating the = need for the large speaker cabinet. (I sold it for more than I paid for = the organ and cabinet). &nbsp;I will continue to have my piano tuned to = A-440. &nbsp;My keyboard had variable tuning, so it can be tuned to the = organ. &nbsp;That solves the problem for now. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a4.2a109554.2a820439_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3000 - 08/03/02 From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2002 01:11:28 EDT   Dear Lee:   It could very well be that one of the amp.'s volume controls may have caused the sound to fade to almost nothing. If it was MAIN it would affect some of the great principal stops and some pedal stops. If it was FLUTE the swell reeds would be rather quiet. Metalic ice builds up over a period of years on those volume pots. Taking the back off the organ and rotating them and resetting them will solve that problem for a good long while. If the whole organ goes silent and won't respond at all, it's a power fuse near the power switch 2A 125V. Just = unscrew the fuse button and replace it with a new one. right next to it may be a 4A 125V. I never had one of those blow. You don't want slo blos you want quick blows. That'll save you and the church a $160 service visit and an hour of posturing. It takes 5 minutes. The tech knows it too.   Ron Severin   PS It's definately not rocket science.