PipeChat Digest #3024 - Thursday, August 8, 2002
 
Re: Gravissima
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Gravissima
  by "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com>
RE: the pricing of pipe organs
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: qualifying buyers AND sellers
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: qualifying buyers AND sellers
  by "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
On builder requirements (Bud's church's requirements)
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com>
Re: Gravissima
  by "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
RE: Robert Noehren
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: spacing of keys on a manual, more information, more questions
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
RE: AH-ha
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Pricing and integrity
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: qualifying buyers AND sellers
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Fascination with the Low Note
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Going to contract
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Gravissima
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: the pricing of pipe organs
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Gravissima (&, incidentally, resultants)
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
RE: My Humble Appologies to the Entire List
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Fascination with the Low Note (rumble, rumble)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Shot" speakers
  by "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com>
RE: Gravissima
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: My Humble Appologies to the Entire List
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Re: Gravissima
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Gravissima From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 23:22:59 +1200     > There have been no others, and > there never will be (I'm sure I'm right in predicting that).   Hi Ross, I thought I had heard that the Wanamaker folks were planning a 64'. Anyone know if that's actually so?   TTFN, Russ   Ross replies, I don't know, and from this far away I'm in no position to know.   I seem to remember about 40 years ago that someone tried going deeper and deeper in flues into the 64ft octave and could only get down to bottom = GGGGG and then nothing would speak beyond that point. My guess is that, if it could be made to work at all, 64ft CCCCC would have to be about 6ft in diameter, about 57ft long, and on about 10" wind. My question is: even if you had the money and the space, why would anyone want to bother trying? = I'm guessing here, but feel that probably the two existing 64fts are = "valuable" only for their harmonics anyway, not the real fundamental they might produce. The standing wave alone would have to be about 100ft+ long. For = my part, I find 32ft CCCC is magnificently low enough and does internal = things to me that I rather enjoy in a reverberant building like York Minster or = St Paul's London, or Liverpool or Grace San Francisco. Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Gravissima From: "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 12:58:56 +0200   Hi,   Certainly, well being reeds the fundamental is not really what they are after, and thus would not be of prime importance (as witha flue). There = was some research that indicated that reeds do not speak a fundamental at all (merely the perception of one is experienced), but whether this was in = fact true I cannot say...   Dave   -----Original Message----- From: Ross & Lynda Wards [mailto:TheShieling@xtra.co.nz] Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2002 1:23 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Gravissima       <SNIP> I'm guessing here, but feel that probably the two existing 64fts are = "valuable" only for their harmonics anyway, not the real fundamental they might produce. The standing wave alone would have to be about 100ft+ long. For = my part, I find 32ft CCCC is magnificently low enough and does internal = things to me that I rather enjoy in a reverberant building like York Minster or = St Paul's London, or Liverpool or Grace San Francisco. </SNIP>  
(back) Subject: RE: the pricing of pipe organs From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 06:36:00 -0500   Bud, don't forget a completion date and a liquidated damages clause in the contract.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: qualifying buyers AND sellers From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 06:41:53 -0500   I would think designing an organ is loosely analogous to designing a house, and one does not get plans, specs and the like for free. I designed my own house, and had to pay a hefty price for it to be drawn and for copies of the final. Of course, as a lawyer, I ended up drafting the building contract. Why don't organ builders charge a set price for design/bid/estimates when there is no commitment? That would weed out those who aren't serious.   Maybe you guys do that, but I'm just throwing this silly idea out there.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: qualifying buyers AND sellers From: "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 05:27:05 -0700 (PDT)   Dear Glenda:   Back in the 1970s, =C6olian-Skinner started charging an "engineering fee".   Many times, the company would draw up plans for an organ layout, and the prospect would take those plans and give them to the cheapest bidder and save the money they would have spent on an engineering drawing with the company from which they actually bought the organ. You can read about this in Charles Callahan's book, AEOLIAN-SKINNER REMEMBERED.   =C6olian-Skinner was screwed many times by these "Christian" organizations.   D. Keith Morgan --- Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote: > I would think designing an organ is loosely > analogous to designing a > house, and one does not get plans, specs and the > like for free. I > designed my own house, and had to pay a hefty price > for it to be drawn > and for copies of the final. Of course, as a > lawyer, I ended up > drafting the building contract. Why don't organ > builders charge a set > price for design/bid/estimates when there is no > commitment? That would > weed out those who aren't serious. > > Maybe you guys do that, but I'm just throwing this > silly idea out there. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs http://www.hotjobs.com  
(back) Subject: On builder requirements (Bud's church's requirements) From: "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 08:31:29 -0400   the church's attitude is :   I'm a musician; I've WORKED for an organ builder; I UNDERSTAND the arguments. But "special pleading" (as the RCs say) isn't going to get you anywhere with bottom-line business CEO types ... their response is going to be, "business is business, and THIS is how you CONDUCT business, if you want MY business."................. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Well, I can appreciate some of this, but generally I would suspect that if you polled every builder out there, especially those whose work is in high demand, most would probably elect to walk away from such nonsense.   But, this is so typical of the church, they have delegated a work of art and human passion in to corporate deadline that you purchase from the assembly line. Hearing this type of attitude really upsets me, but it is their church and they are welcome to do with it as they please...   I just think that other churches with a more realistic approach to the process are going to have many more choices of builders (and probably better organs).   And what type of instrument does the church expect to get if there is some delay and the organ has to get thrown up there just to meet the deadline.... A prime example of of some of the work done by some of the big old builders of yesteryear that were already mentioned!   Then there is the other side of the coin... Maybe Chris isn't hungry but more of a business man than the leaders of the church... Anyone knows that to meet and complete such demands is going to take money and lots of it.   Chances are that if Chris is smart then he knows that he has to charge the living daylights for this project or it could be his tail!   Regardless of the money or what ever, I personally think this is what's wrong with the church in general. Everyone brings their corporate mindset to the table and screws everything up. A prime example why organists and musicians are paid so little.   Just a couple of thoughts... Wayne  
(back) Subject: Re: Gravissima From: "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 05:43:19 -0700 (PDT)   Dear Russ:   If such a useless stop as a 64' flue or reed were built, can you imagine how much that would cost? It's diffecult enough to get a good 32' in an organ.   As far as tuning is concerned, anything that low would make such a useless noise that it probably wouldn't matter whether it was in tune or not.   As for electronic tuners, I have never seen one that went lower than 8' C.   By the way, if a 64' stopped pipe swelled and the stopper fell down into the pipe, wouldn't that be fun to try and get out?   I would like to see someone build a 5 1/3' Bombarde Celeste. I'm sure that would be as useful as a 64' Gravissima.   D. Keith Morgan     --- Russ Greene <rggreene2@shaw.ca> wrote: > On 8/7/02 3:09 PM, COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote: > > > I couldn't for the life of me imagine even hearing > it to be able to tune > > it!! > > RBC > > Do electronic tuners go that low?! > > Russ > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs http://www.hotjobs.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Robert Noehren From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 08:50:43 -0400   I look forward to this. I have recordings by him but know nothing about = him. Will your piece be a comprehensive piece on his life and work?   RBC BTW Was that you in the Raspberry T-shirt whom I passed on the stairs of = the Astor Place subway station @ ca 8 a.m. this morning (Thurs. 8/8). I descending and you ascending?   ++++++++     I am hoping to publish some material on the life, work, and philosophy of Robert Noehren in the next issue of The Journal of American Organbuilding, =   the official publication of the American Institute of Organbuilders.  
(back) Subject: Re: spacing of keys on a manual, more information, more questions From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 08:15:58 -0500   ISO Information #18 1978 article by Jan Rowland should answer most if = not all of your questions. You should be able to get this at a good library or = through interlibrary loan. If not, contact me, and I can possibly help. Roy Redman   Ray Kimber wrote:   > Dear List, > > Thank you to the folks who have previously responded about the width of = the > sharp keys. > > I haven't been able to locate any definitive spec from the ISO or the = ISO > (Although <laughing> I was inititially thinking that ISO stood for > International Standards Ogranization, I now also know about the > International Society of Organbuilders) > > Here is one interesting link that I discovered > > http://www.bikexprt.com/music/introduc.htm > > I am still wondering if there is "standard" set of specs that define the > keyboard. > > Kind regards, > > Ray Kimber > > ray@kimber.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: AH-ha From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 09:39:46 -0400   >When a specification lists a foot reading for a "mixture" stop... I = assume the 2 2/3' refers to the lowest pitch. Am I correct?   Yes, it's the lowest pitch on the lowest note. Or to put it another way, it's the speaking length of the lowest pipe, as with other stops. Of course, mixtures usually break back as you go up the scale, so they become lower than that with respect to the fundamental in the trebles.    
(back) Subject: Pricing and integrity From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 08:49:22 -0500     Russ Greene wrote: <describing the construction of a 1920's building with very little in the way of drawings and specifications>   > <snip> basically saying build me a good quality limestone. . . Most > = of the contract for a major building was actually a handshake between > = the buyer and the builder. All the rest was left to faith that the > contractor would do a good job. And he did.   <snip> > What a shame. The lengths we now have to go to, the expense we now have = to > incur, all because we no longer are able to trust one another's = integrity.   I think that's the bottom line. Artistic and musical results simply do not result from being "horsewhipped" by the corporate types. On the most recent project we've worked on, that approach was being attempted by some Trustees in an effort to "save face" and prove to their congregation that they were "in control" after the original builder had gone bankrupt. Obviously: they had enormous pressure on them after that happened.   As the successor builder, in an effort to placate them, we played along for awhile and did everything reasonably possible to comply. However, after one problem after another after another of the original builder's work surfaced, I finally gave them an ultimatum: quit the ridiculous pressure tactics or find another builder.   At that point, after seeing the quality of work we were doing, they relented; especially after they came to realize that no other builder was going to touch the mess this church had gotten themselves into with a 10 foot pole.   Whenever I think of these corporate types, I think of the pointy-haired boss in the comic strip DILBERT; demands results, but is completely clueless.   And let's face it: corporate types or not; most churches are indeed CLUELESS, and that means they have to be patiently educated all along the way. Hand-holding on the part of sensitive builders goes a long way in getting them to instill trust that integrity is there and "let go".   I think that I can accurately say that the integrity of most builders can be easily judged by the calibre of their work. If it's really well-executed, they prolly spent a good bit more time than they were paid for to see to that. And that kind of quality should be evident even to the untrained eye. It doesn't take rocket science to observe whether INTERIOR components are finely finished and carefully and neatly fitted, as opposed to being thrown together and winded with dryer hose held in place with hot-melt glue, while the pipes on top have their resonators "skyracked" by using screws through them into the nearest 2X4! Trust me: I've SEEN it and in an instrument by what was supposed to be a "world class" builder (whatever THAT implies!)   Of course, the people who cut corners are smiling as they walk away with all the money and are vacationing in faraway places while those of us who actually care never do. After being beat-up a time or two, it certainly can be enough to cause one to re-think their priorities and look to do something financially far more lucrative with one's talent.   Faithfully,   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Re: qualifying buyers AND sellers From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 09:02:50 -0500     "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote: > It sounds pretty sleazy to me. To use someone else's designs? Iron = stomach, > nothing a law suit is certainly in the calling here. I'm not a believer = in > suing everyone for everything. Quite the contrary but this kind of = nonsense > is outright stealing.   And actionable if the design is copyrighted. We always mark copyright on our designs. In fact, whenever I prepared a Punchlist for a group of Trustees, in order to keep them from disseminating that information we'd so painstakingly gathered to other builders for "a competitive bid", we wrote a boilerplate on the document that the information was provided for the use of the church trustees and the original builder (me) only and that dissemination of the information to competing builders was actionable as a breach of trust.   Write that stuff in. Protect your interests.   Faithfully,   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Fascination with the Low Note From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 10:09:32 EDT   The common fascination with 32' (and 64' stops) often robs a pipe organ of =   some of its more essential components. Frequently, a 32' extension (or an =   artificial sound simulating such voices) is included before more musically =   useful stops.   Some suggestions:   An 8' Diapason on a secondary or tertiary manual. Making your mutations full compass. Actually including a full set of mutations in the right place. Building your undulants full compass. Completing a reed chorus. Making your fractional length 16' chorus reed into the real thing (full length). A 16' string in the pedal (you'll use it constantly).   The list could go on, but think about it -- what does the music demand?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Going to contract From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 10:12:10 EDT   The most successful pipe organ projects involve a badminton game, back and =   forth, between the client's attorneys and the builder's attorneys, in = which everybody involved knows exactly what they are getting and for how much, = and when, EVEN IF that contract includes escalation or contingency clauses.  
(back) Subject: Re: Gravissima From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 10:39:19 -0400   On 8/8/02 7:22 AM, "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > >> There have been no others, and >> there never will be (I'm sure I'm right in predicting that). > > Hi Ross, > I thought I had heard that the Wanamaker folks were planning a 64'. = Anyone > know if that's actually so? > They could use the atrium itself--but the scale is a bit broad.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: the pricing of pipe organs From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 10:51:09 -0400   You mean you have to complete the job!!   -   Bud, don't forget a completion date and a liquidated damages clause in the contract.   Glenda Sutton  
(back) Subject: Re: Gravissima (&, incidentally, resultants) From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 07:52:07 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <. For my > part, I find 32ft CCCC is magnificently low enough and does internal things > to me that I rather enjoy in a reverberant building like York Minster or St > Paul's London, or Liverpool or Grace San Francisco.   Amen! And be it noted that the bottom 5 notes of the 32' Diapason at Grace Cathedral are resultants. They sure fool me.   Michael Fox >    
(back) Subject: RE: My Humble Appologies to the Entire List From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 11:20:36 -0400   Where was the Dirigible Organ Company located? Never heard of it. RBC   ---       It was a Dirigible organ!    
(back) Subject: Re: Fascination with the Low Note (rumble, rumble) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 08:34:26 -0700   Once again, HURRAY! for Sebastian.   All too often we see things like an organ with a Party Horn on the Great as the ONLY reed, the elements of the Cornet scattered across three manuals, the Oboe at 4', an organ of 50 stops with ONE 8' manual Principal, etc. etc. etc.   A word about 32's, which I think he already mentioned: on an electric-action organ, all that's really required to make a very useful 32' Resultant is placing the 16' Bourdon or Sub Bass or whatever your 16' stopped wood pedal rank is on a unit/duplex chest, and providing 12 INDEPENDENT quint pipes of slightly smaller scale and softer intonation. Some 19th century builders used violone-scale open metal pipes for the quints, rather than another stopped wood rank.   Notes 1-12 play the 16' Bourdon + the independent Quint; notes 13-32 play the 16' Bourdon AN OCTAVE LOWER, avoiding the somewhat unpleasant sound of the quint in the upper range of the pedal. Since the quints are independent and can be tuned true, and can be voiced to match up with the unison, given even AVERAGE acoustics, you can make a VERY believable 32' stop for the cost of 12 quint pipes. Most Resultants DON'T work because the quints aren't independent, and are typically drawn from the Swell Lieblich Gedeckt, or whatever.   Cheers,   Bud   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > > The common fascination with 32' (and 64' stops) often robs a pipe organ = of > some of its more essential components. Frequently, a 32' extension (or = an > artificial sound simulating such voices) is included before more = musically > useful stops. > > Some suggestions: > > An 8' Diapason on a secondary or tertiary manual. > Making your mutations full compass. > Actually including a full set of mutations in the right place. > Building your undulants full compass. > Completing a reed chorus. > Making your fractional length 16' chorus reed into the real thing (full > length). > A 16' string in the pedal (you'll use it constantly). > > The list could go on, but think about it -- what does the music demand? > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Shot" speakers From: "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 10:34:53 -0500   > John wrote: > > Dennis, having dealt with the sound business for a great number of > years, the only part that fails is a voice coil that opens up or > overheats and starts rubbing, If all that is intact, the suspension > ring could fail as you state also, which can be replaced at a > fraction of the cost of the new speaker. I thought I mentioned that > fact earlier. Moreover there are speaker repair outfits that will > re-coil or even re-cone your driver, again ususally at a fraction of > the original cost. Certainly much less than overpriced ......well I > wont say... but the initials are RS. >   I find the discussion of speakers interesting having worked for Celestion = and Bose. John is correct that the voice coil can fail. Too much power will = cause it to overheat, the heat may cause deformation of the former (causing it to = rub) or the thin wire used may simply fail.   The surround is another component that can fail, especially when composed = of foam for high compliance woofers. If anyone purchased Advent speakers in the = 70s and still has them they know what I'm talking about. It seems ozone from = automobile pollution has a great appetite for foam surrounds and in urban areas the = life span of these speakers was distressingly short.   Finally, amplifier dirtortion will blow tweeters. This is caused by an = amplifier with too little power not too much. Here's how that happens. If an = amplifier is turned up to the point that it sounds at all distorted, it is clipping. = The amp will only produce so much power, when it can't produce more power the top = of the wave gets clipped off. This produces a waveform with a flat top, much like = a square wave. These waveforms have infinite harmonics in them and these = harmonics get shunted by the crossover to the tweeter. Generally high frequencies = have much lower amplitude than low frequencies, but these are high frequencies with = the amplitude of low frequencies and that blows the tweeter.   Yes speakers can be reconed, if there's a kit available or a generic that = comes close. If the cone kit isn't from the original manufacturer it will have different characteristics from the original and may no longer match the enclosure. It's also a procedure that requires skill and experience, not = for the do it yourselfer.   The moral of this story for digital organs is that amplifiers and speakers = are a system. It's good to have more than enough power, but it's best to have = more than enough of both. When in doubt consult a sound reinforcement professional.   Steve    
(back) Subject: RE: Gravissima From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2002 11:51:17 -0400   I've not ever seen an electronic organ with a 64' stop. I really do not = see any purpose in it on pipe organs, quite frankly. And I don't understand = why some organs have 32' stops on manuals. What for, the little old "pianist" who never learned to use the pedals and offers her/his services on Sunday = to their local church? S/he certainly ain't gonna play on the manuals any = BACH or other composer whose works might "require" that "gravitas" in the pedal part!! And most assuredly no organ, no matter how large the space, really requires more than 2 32' pedal stops; one flue one reed. Basta!--RBC   -----Original Message----- From: Russ Greene [mailto:rggreene2@shaw.ca] Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2002 5:05 PM To: PIPECHAT-L Subject: Re: Gravissima     On 8/7/02 3:09 PM, COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote:   > I couldn't for the life of me imagine even hearing it to be able to tune > it!! > RBC   Do electronic tuners go that low?!   Russ     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: My Humble Appologies to the Entire List From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 11:57:48 -0400       "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote: > > Where was the Dirigible Organ Company located? Never heard of it. > RBC >   The Company never found a home base and as a result the firm's future was always 'up in the air'.   The "Hindenburg Stop", though was Legendary.   Stan     > > It was a Dirigible organ!    
(back) Subject: Re: Gravissima From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 08 Aug 2002 11:58:46 -0400   on 8/8/02 11:51 AM, COLASACCO, ROBERT at RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org wrote:   I don't understand why > some organs have 32' stops on manuals. RBC   I believe there has been some discussion in the past on this list or the other one about French organs that have 32' stops on the manuals and of = the music that calls for it. Don't have any first-hand knowledge, though.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu