PipeChat Digest #3028 - Friday, August 9, 2002
 
Hudson Valley Bach Fest (was Gravissima)
  by <patmai@juno.com>
RE: Juels[sp?]
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: 5 1/3 Reed
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Gravissima
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
RE: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc.
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Aging Electronics
  by "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net>
RE: Gravissima
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Setting Divisional pistons, etc.
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: Setting Divisional pistons, etc.
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Memory levels
  by "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net>
RE: Memory levels
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc.
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc.
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc.
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
breathless playing
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Johannes Organs
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
 

(back) Subject: Hudson Valley Bach Fest (was Gravissima) From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 08:54:01 -0400   Dear Doug and Pipechatters,   Thank you, Doug, for remembering the wonders of the Christmas Eve service at the Cadet Chapel when we premiered your Gloria for Christmas.   This weekend, the musicians in the Hudson Valley are donating their services for the third annual H V Bach Fest. August 9-11 in Cornwall-on Hudson (Fri and Sunday) and Poughkeepsie (Saturday).   Tonight is the Keyboard Marathon featuring the 24 Preludes and Fugues from Book II of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Location: Cornwall Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cornwall-on-Hudson, NY. Time: 7:30 PM, Suggested (but not mandatory) donation is $7.00.   A few of us may choose to play some of the Preludes and Fugues on the two manual pipe organ built c. 30 years ago by Henry VanSeters, retired Curator of Pipe Organs (Cadet Chapel, Post Chapel, Old Cadet Chapel) at West Point. No, there is no Gravissima stop on this orgel!   For more info, please visit   http://hudsonvalleysocietyformusic.org   or call 845-534-2166 re Friday night..   Your prayers and good wishes are requested for this organist, whose right ankle is mightily swollen and right wrist, left eye and both knees are bruised after a recent fall on concrete.   With best wishes to all, preparing to play for a memorial service at 9:30 AM EDT in the Old Cadet Chapel,   Pat Maimone patmai@juno.com yp6867@exmail.usma.army.mil     ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: RE: Juels[sp?] From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 09:14:05 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C23FA6.A3610240 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   Hey it worked. Now how do I put it back together! -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com] Sent: Friday, August 09, 2002 4:00 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Juels[sp?]     In a message dated 8/8/02 4:55:24 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:         Yet another question concerning organs, digital organs. Can anyone on this =   list recommend the proper circuit breaker for a medium sized digital = organ?         A large mallet should do it!!! ;-) heeheehee   Bruce in the Muttestery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502   ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C23FA6.A3610240 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4916.2300" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><SPAN class=3D727441313-09082002><FONT face=3D"Footlight MT Light" color=3D#800000>Hey it worked. Now how do I put it back together!</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr align=3Dleft><FONT = face=3DTahoma size=3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Friday, August 09, 2002 4:00 AM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Re: Juels[sp?]<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT = size=3D2>In a message dated 8/8/02 4:55:24 PM !!!First Boot!!!, = RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes: <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px" TYPE=3D"CITE">Yet another question concerning organs, digital organs. Can = anyone on this <BR>list recommend the proper circuit breaker for a medium sized =   digital organ? <BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial color=3D#000000 = size=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial = color=3D#000000 size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"><BR>A large mallet should do it!!! &nbsp;;-) =   &nbsp;heeheehee <BR><BR>Bruce in the Muttestery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; =   wealth &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT> </FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C23FA6.A3610240--  
(back) Subject: Re: 5 1/3 Reed From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Fri, 09 Aug 2002 08:23:55 -0500   long time ago, I had an elucid date....but she wasn't that pretty.   Glad sumwun in the groop uses big words!   Jon Bertschinger   <Grins>  
(back) Subject: Re: Gravissima From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 10:07:34 EDT   In a message dated 8/8/02 11:52:55 AM Eastern Daylight Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:   << I've not ever seen an electronic organ with a 64' stop. >>   You'd need a really decent, good size woofer (i.e., bass speaker) to make = it sound good.  
(back) Subject: RE: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc. From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 10:23:53 -0400   >a multiple memory system would allow each student to devote their practice time to Practice, rather than PISTON SETTING.   This is a good point.   I know very little about solid state combination systems, e.g. the prices. For a typical three-manual of fifty or sixty stops, are we talking $hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands? I've been afraid to ask. Even a few thousand sounds rarified to me, who have always had to consider myself fortunate if there are funds just to keep an organ in tune properly and repair ciphers.   Is there a major difference in price between providing a system in a new console vs. retro-fitting?   My other question: are systems on the market whose memories for divisional pistons and general pistons are separately selectable? I've always relied heavily on divisional pistons for service playing and hardly touch the generals except for voluntaries. Even in registering for a recital, I am apt to begin by setting the divisional pistons to provide standard registrations at various dynamic levels, and am rather reluctant if the need arises to interrupt = this scheme for purely logistical reasons. It was reassuring to hear Joyce Jones, to name one major recitalist, explain how she not only proceeds similarly but has gotten this down to a science. It really helps her = adapt from one organ to another, or even unexpectedly from one manual to another in case of something malfunctioning in the middle of a performance.   Do you see where I'm going with this? An unlimited number of general pistons per se is a dream/dream-come-true. BUT-- if getting another batch of generals compels one to RESET all the = divisionals, then a multiple memory system STILL makes us devote a lot of time to piston setting; it may even be = counterproductive.   Paul    
(back) Subject: Re: Aging Electronics From: "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 07:28:04 -0700   This survey determined that ON AVERAGE an electronic organ was in situ in a church for 18 years. This is not to say that after 18 years the organ was worthless, or beyond help, just that at that point it was removed. . . .there was no implication as to WHY the organ was removed, simply that it was.   Is it not interesting that speakers and amplifier aging becomes quite noticeable at about the same time ? How many electronic instruments were replaced rather than having the amplifiers and speakers serviced ? I would venture to guess that the average congregation member has never heard of "cone replacement, has no clue that speakers ever need any kind of service, and think that if the sound is bad the whole instrument must need replacing. Add to this mix an electronic organ salesman who is far more interested   ----------------------------------------   Good points well made, but forgetting one thing -- the changes in = technology   Consider the first-generation digitals. They were not all that exciting = to listen to, actually they were sterile sounding. 15-18 years would have = put you into the late second or third generation. Much better sound, more randomness and less sterility. Regardless of speakers and amplifiers, = they just sounded better. Plus other advancements made them better instruments all around.   Going back even further, contrast the later Baldwin 5's & 10's with the organs that followed them by 15-18 years. I don't know that anyone would argue that the old 12-oscillator Bald-ones sounded better than the Rodgers 180+ oscillator organs that followed it.   But from my own experience, I can back up what Doug says -- replacing aged speakers does make a difference. So if everything else were equal, replacing speakers and possibly amplifiers would greatly refresh the = sound.   D      
(back) Subject: RE: Gravissima From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 10:42:48 -0400   John Foss:   >That wonderful rumble - whether the 32' Open Wood or Bombardon - adds something special to that special occasion - as Douglas campbell said. However it can be done perfectly effectively with electronics, thus saving =   the cost of 32' pipes.   Indeed: it can be, and is, done *too* perfectly. The more brilliant the stop is, the more this is evident. It's too perfect, too regular, and ultimately clearly ersatz and hence disappointing rather than exciting.   I'm not disagreeing with John; in the case of 32' stops, I, too, would probably yield to the temptation to install one or two electronics. But beyond that, would I fall for creeping digitalis-- go on and add an electronic string division, solo flutes, manual bombardes, etc.? I hope not. One soon erodes and adulterates the integrity of the instrument. = I've heard a few of these installations. The electronic blending with the = pipes can be very well done, so that it may be impossible to tell which is = which-- yet the whole effect of the organ becomes, one might say, too perfect, but also plastic, boring, and rather creepy.   Caveat emptor...      
(back) Subject: Setting Divisional pistons, etc. From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 09 Aug 2002 09:56:35 -0500     "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > I know very little about solid state combination systems, e.g. the = prices. > For a typical three-manual of fifty or sixty stops, are we > talking $hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands? I've been afraid to > ask.   The systems themselves are relatively inexpensive. It all depends upon whether or not you have a Combination Action conducive to such a retrofit already. In many older instruments, such is not the case and new Stop Action Magnets (which is where the REAL expense is!)-be it Drawknob, Tilting Tablet or Stop key, are required.   > Is there a major difference in price between providing a system in a new > console vs. retro-fitting?   Somewhat higher for retro-fitting because of the on-site time (going to get the console) and then the time to "gut" the console. In some cases new Nameboards and drawknob need to be fabricated also; particularly if the specification changes (and it nearly always does!) > My other question: are systems on the market whose memories for = divisional > pistons and general pistons are separately > selectable?   What do you mean by "separately selectable?" Do you mean in terms of memory level? Please explain.   > BUT-- if getting another batch of generals compels one to RESET all the = divisionals, > then a multiple memory system STILL makes > us devote a lot of time to piston setting; it may even be = counterproductive.   I suppose it would be possible to do this, but most people consider that having additional divisional pistons to be a liberating factor rather than an inconvenience.   Some systems have a "copy" function that allows you to copy the settings from one level to another. With Peterson's MSP 1,000 system, all one would have to do is make the setting once on the Drawknobs, and then simply change the memory level and "set" the same drawknobs on each memory level. In other words: just "scroll" through the memory levels while setting all of the "Great 1" Pistons, for instance; then repeat that procedure for the remainder of the divisional pistons.   Hope this helps!   Faithfully,   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: RE: Setting Divisional pistons, etc. From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 11:17:18 -0400   >What do you mean by "separately selectable?" Do you mean in terms of memory level? Please explain.   I'd envision, ideally, a series of memory levels for the generals, and a completely separate series of memory levels for the divisionals; one could change the generals from level 1 to level 2 but keep the divisionals on level 1. I *think* I saw something like this on the console of an English cathedral a few years = ago, but have not encountered it in the U.S.   >In other words: just "scroll" through the memory levels while setting all of the "Great 1" Pistons, for instance; then repeat that procedure for the remainder of the divisional pistons.   All 30-60 of them one at a time, huh? Still a lot of work, and = error-prone. How about simply being able to copy the whole shebang in one swell foop: memory level 33 =3D=3D> memory level 34, then change level 34 as usual, = rather than beginning with a whole level of cancels? That would do most of what I'm imagining, and would offer other advantages, too.   >most people consider that having additional divisional pistons to be a liberating factor rather >than an inconvenience.   Well, yes, me too-- but that is not to say that whenever we want a new series of generals, we ordinarily also want a new series of divisionals. This does not correspond to reality, especially for service-playing purposes.   If funds were ample and I weren't destroying a historic mechanical system, would I go for a multi-level system? You bet. I'm just asking about (or imagining/proposing) a refinement or two over the typical models found.   Paul    
(back) Subject: Re: Memory levels From: "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 09:46:42 -0700   >Now, do I think that a 20 rank organ NEEDS 100 levels of memory ??????   100 levels of memory are a lot, and exept on a teaching organ, probably excessive. But it's very possible, the way chips are made these days, = that even if you only got 20 or so levels, the rest of the 100 would still be there -- it's usually cheaper from a manufacturing standpoint to make ONE chip for 100 then say 10 chips for 10 levels each. The net cost to the organ purchaser shouldn't be that different, go for them -- then preset = two years worth of Sunday registrations!   D      
(back) Subject: RE: Memory levels From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 12:53:40 -0400   Can these be installed in humans? Where am I, is this the Latin list? RBC     -----Original Message----- From: Dennis Goward [mailto:dlgoward@qwest.net] Sent: Friday, August 09, 2002 12:47 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Memory levels     >Now, do I think that a 20 rank organ NEEDS 100 levels of memory ??????   100 levels of memory are a lot, and exept on a teaching organ, probably excessive. But it's very possible, the way chips are made these days, = that even if you only got 20 or so levels, the rest of the 100 would still be there -- it's usually cheaper from a manufacturing standpoint to make ONE chip for 100 then say 10 chips for 10 levels each. The net cost to the organ purchaser shouldn't be that different, go for them -- then preset = two years worth of Sunday registrations!   D       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc. From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 13:16:30 EDT     --part1_190.b35c079.2a8552ee_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   someone said: > a multiple memory system would allow each student to devote their > practice time to Practice, rather than PISTON SETTING.   If they weren't so dependent upon pistons and REALLY were practicing, they =   wouldn't need to spend all of that time with pistons. It has sort of become a pattern that the more pistons a recitalist uses, the less = artistic the playing is. There ARE exceptions, of course, but they are exceptions rather than the rule (so let's not start listing them...we all know who = they are!).   The AEolian-Skinner at Christ Church Cathedral - Houston had 8 pistons for =   each division and generals and was perfectly adequate. I never felt the = need for more, nor did I ever hear Bill Barnard wish for more.   In the 70s I played a weekly recital series on a 4/90 A-S with NO pistons = and did not feel that I was crippled. The organ now has new solid state = pistons out the bazoo and doesn't sound a bit better!!!   Franck is one of the composers whose music suffers the most from being over-pistoned! It removes the "breath" from his directions.   Bruce in the Muttestery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_190.b35c079.2a8552ee_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>someone said: <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">a multiple memory = system would allow each student to devote their <BR>practice time to Practice, rather than PISTON SETTING.</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>If they weren't so dependent upon pistons and REALLY were practicing, = they wouldn't need to spend all of that time with pistons. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It has sort of become a pattern that the more pistons a = recitalist uses, the less artistic the playing is. &nbsp;There ARE = exceptions, of course, but they are exceptions rather than the rule (so = let's not start listing them...we all know who they are!). <BR> <BR>The AEolian-Skinner at Christ Church Cathedral - Houston had 8 pistons = for each division and generals and was perfectly adequate. &nbsp;I never = felt the need for more, nor did I ever hear Bill Barnard wish for more. <BR> <BR>In the 70s I played a weekly recital series on a 4/90 A-S with NO = pistons and did not feel that I was crippled. &nbsp;&nbsp;The organ now = has new solid state pistons out the bazoo and doesn't sound a bit = better!!! <BR> <BR>Franck is one of the composers whose music suffers the most from being = over-pistoned! &nbsp;&nbsp;It removes the "breath" from his directions. <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttestery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_190.b35c079.2a8552ee_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc. From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 13:18:17 EDT   Dear Paul:   You've made my point, rebuilding an old combo action in most cases is more expensive than a modern action. Organists also appreciate being able to set pistons and leave them for their next practice secession rather than feel compelled to undo them each time they finish. The old ones were noisy and inefficient. An organ in excess of 166 ranks certainly could benefit from a multiple memory piston action especially when several students are involved, and many recitals are given on it. To make an organ a backward in time machine, when the original builder was always foreward looking and innovative really flies in the face of his spirit. From a practical standpoint it does make sense to modernize a large multipurpose organ as E. M. Skinner would have done if the technology was available to him. To do anything else in my book is foolish, bullheaded, and insensative to the need. This is where I part company with the historically correct crowd. You can still register by hand too as we all do. There's nothing built into a modern system with a hand to come out and slap you if you should hand register a piece.   The arguments for a historical rebuild, also flies in the face of Aristide Cavaille Coll, Arp Schnitger, and a whole host of others in the US and around the world who have added to and changed older work for the better. These inturn have become historic organs in their own right. This same crowd will build a "Historical Organ" and cast it in a non historical temperment and wonder why it doesn't work well for old music. I do appreciate old things, but not everyone needs to remain in it's old condition to be useful. In turn it will eventually be a historical work. = and so it goes.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: restoring Skinners, pistons, etc. From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2002 13:47:10 -0400   >To make an organ a backward in time machine, when the original builder = was always foreward looking and innovative really flies in the face of his spirit.   You could use this argument to do all sorts of things that have ruined historic instruments. Cavaille-Coll and E.M. Skinner were forward-looking, ergo why not electrify S. Sulpice, Aeolianize S. Luke's, Evanston etc. etc. to stay current with the thinking of each generation? Aren't we glad now that these two organs, at least, were preserved from = the fate that befell numerous counterparts?   I'd rather err on the side of caution, because we don't entirely know what posterity will consider valuable or instructive in an instrument, and that is truer the newer it is. Every OHS convention celebrates various organs that survived more-or-less intact only by default, but now we're glad. = Even with those that are not masterpieces as they stand, modernization attempts would not, from our perspective, have improved them as much as people thought at the time, and hence we could see such proposals in retrospect = as a waste of trouble. If you are tampering with a masterpiece, obviously = you are liable to make a mistake; if you are tampering with a sow's ear, what are the chances of making a silk purse out of it anyway?   >Cavaille Coll, Arp Schnitger, and a whole host of others in the US and around the world who have added to and changed older work for the better.   Historical consciousness hardly existed in Schnitger's time. It was just beginning to do so in Cavaille-Coll's. I like it. More than that, I daresay that such a perspective is actually crucial to human freedom and dignity in a democratic sense, because it arms the mind against propaganda and manipulation. There are some signs that it is receding in popular culture; if so, this is a change to be dreaded.          
(back) Subject: breathless playing From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 09 Aug 2002 13:58:00 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3111746281_1161916_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit     Franck is one of the composers whose music suffers the most from being over-pistoned! It removes the "breath" from his directions.   Bruce in the Muttestery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   This is intriguing. If I understand you correctly, you are saying that in Franck the changes in registration are meant to take a little time to accomplish, that these "breaths" are built into the music. Any other composers of which that can be said?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       --MS_Mac_OE_3111746281_1161916_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>breathless playing</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> Franck is one of the composers whose music suffers the most from being = over=3D -pistoned! &nbsp;&nbsp;It removes the &quot;breath&quot; from his = directions=3D .. <BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon50=3D 2 <BR> ....an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC=3D 2053</FONT></FONT> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> This is intriguing. &nbsp;If I understand you correctly, you are saying = tha=3D t in Franck the changes in registration are meant to take a little time to = a=3D ccomplish, that these &quot;breaths&quot; are built into the music. = &nbsp;An=3D y other composers of which that can be said?<BR> <BR> <BR> Randy Runyon<BR> Music Director<BR> Zion Lutheran Church<BR> Hamilton, Ohio<BR> runyonr@muohio.edu<BR> <BR> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3111746281_1161916_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Re: Johannes Organs From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 09 Aug 2002 13:07:10 -0500   A local church had the same issue of deciding on a new digital organ. We actually had an Allen Renaissance 230 and a Rodgers Trillium 807 in the building at the same time. The prices were very comparable. It was an open & shut case for the Rodgers, the sound filled the room much better. The Allen was "bearable", but in my opinion the Rodgers really did much more---plus there were many voices and nice options that really made the Rodgers easier to play---and listen to. I have heard the Johannus demo CD, and was quite impressed. I'm waiting for the opportunity to hear one in a good room---then I might have something to say about them as well.   Paul     Icedad@aol.com wrote: > > Dear Phil, > > Are you considering buying a Johannes for yourself or a church? > Our church Organ Committee and I spent over one year listening, > playing and finding out about all the digital organs. Needless to say, > we went with an Allen Renaissance pipe/digital combination. The > digital voices are quite outstanding. Johannes, Rodgers and Allen all > make fine instruments, BUT there is a difference with the Allen > Renaissance. The sound and technology of the Allen Renaissance are far > ahead of the other digital organs.Stop and play and listen to one!! > You will be astounded!! Good Luck!! > > Daniel