PipeChat Digest #3034 - Sunday, August 11, 2002
 
Re: New Topics
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Effects of changing wind pressure, et al.
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
Re: Hammonds
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: semi-new topic
  by "Daniel Muller" <dvm5704@dcccd.edu>
Re: Effects of changing wind pressure, et al.
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: semi-new topic
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: semi-new topic
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: what we maybe SHOULD be talking about
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: New Topics
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Playing a Hammond
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: The Instrument We Have
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: New Topics From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 16:37:56 -0500   On 8/11/02 1:31 AM, Chris Tackett wrote:   > My question: Why do people do that? I guess it's human nature to want = what > we don't have, but why do perfectly good instruments that don't conform = to > one person's idea of one historical period have to be remade into = something > that is ultimately neither fish nor fowl?   Hi Chris, A horrible shame I think.   One of the instruments I learned on was a sizable 3 manual Casavant circa 1959. It was a beautiful instrument, very versatile. It seemed to fall in the post-Romantic, pre-Phelps era for Casavant and you could play anything on it with good results.   A recent organist has ripped out the Choir expressive shades and revoiced the Choir in an unsuccessful attempt to make it a Baroque Positif, = disabled Trems, taken out the Celeste pipes, done some other revoicing to thin out the sound - it's a mess, a real tragedy.   A great organ, probably the best on the Canadian Prairies, turned into a poor one on the whim of an organist who likely will only be there a few years. What were the vestry and the rector thinking when they allowed this to happen?   TTFN, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Effects of changing wind pressure, et al. From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 17:46:27 -0400   [Bud, thank you for opening the door to questions from those of us with = less experience. Some of us need that kind of encouragement from time to = time.]   When our organ was moved from its previous (smaller) location, the wind = pressure was increased. I assume that this makes the pipes sound louder. What are = other consequences? I believe no revoicing was done.   The swell has the original reservoir, which now has three cement blocks on = top. (Installation in our building required separating the swell and great, so = the great got a new reservoir.)   The things I notice are: (1) the swell dynamic range barely gets down to = the mezzo-piano level; (2) the swell reed (Trompette) has taken on a harsh = character and refuses to stay in tune; (3) some notes on the 8' swell flute sound a = little overblown.   Another question (or story for comment): The pedal reed (Bombarde) was = extended so that we could have an 8' reed in the great. It sounds really nice, but = the release is sluggish, making trills sound sloppy (I don't need help with = this) and making quick note repetitions impossible in the octave or so above = middle C. In examining the chest, the tuner indicated that there were "primaries" = only on the lowest two notes of the extension, and he wished whoever built the = chest had used "primaries" up another octave or so.   When he took the chest apart (he wanted to try extending the springs a = little), he showed me the "primaries", and I was fascinated at how the chest is put together -- nothing like I imagined. All thoses hoses! He peeled off the covering over the spring and extended a few of them. It helped a little.   I asked and he explained about "primaries" -- two valves for a note? -- = but I don't think I get it.   What would be a reasonable action to take or request to make?   I'm a part-timer. I don't expect to provide specifications for any organ. = I love playing this pipe organ and would only be happier if it could reach = its full potential.   Thanks in advance for all helpful information and suggestions.   Mark Koontz      
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 16:47:28 -0500   On 8/11/02 9:36 AM, First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois wrote:   > ...numerous tonewheel B3-C3s and spinets, and never heard a key click or > pop from ANY of 'em. What am I missing--and why can't I--with good > hearing and a reasonably musical ear--figure it out? Or maybe I just > had/played "good" Hammonds.   The B3-C3's that I've played over the years all had the slight chiff in = the initial attack - the famous "key click/pop". The added definition this = gave to the individual notes was always considered a feature, not a bug, by Hammond enthusiasts. So maybe you just played "bad" Hammonds!   Cheers, Russ    
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: "Daniel Muller" <dvm5704@dcccd.edu> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 18:09:24 -0500   Oh, same old same old.   Propers: Graduale Romanum Offertory meditation (schola): Lucis Creator optime Communion processional: Adoro Te devote Post: Salve Regina (simple tone)   ....the usual.   Organ music (including generous servings of Benoit) coming soon.   Thanks for asking!   Daniel Muller Blessed Sacrament Church Dallas, Texas   on 8/11/02 1:26 PM, J. Nathan at jnatpat@infi.net wrote:   > Soooooooo.....new topic. > How was the music at everyone's church this morning? > How did you play? > Any funny/touching/embarassing stories.... > > puhleeeeeze.... > > JNathan... >  
(back) Subject: Re: Effects of changing wind pressure, et al. From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 19:12:53 EDT     --part1_14a.1241f746.2a884975_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/2002 5:47:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, markkoontz@yahoo.com writes:     > When our organ was moved from its previous (smaller) location, the wind > pressure > was increased. I assume that this makes the pipes sound louder. What = are > other > consequences? I believe no revoicing was done. > > The swell has the original reservoir, which now has three cement blocks = on > top. > (Installation in our building required separating the swell and great, = so > the > great got a new reservoir.) > > The things I notice are: (1) the swell dynamic range barely gets down = to > the > mezzo-piano level; (2) the swell reed (Trompette) has taken on a harsh > character > and refuses to stay in tune; (3) some notes on the 8' swell flute sound = a > little > overblown. > > Another question (or story for comment): The pedal reed (Bombarde) was > extended > so that we could have an 8' reed in the great. It sounds really nice, = but > the > release is sluggish, making trills sound sloppy (I don't need help with > this) > and making quick note repetitions impossible in the octave or so above > middle C. > In examining the chest, the tuner indicated that there were "primaries" > only on > the lowest two notes of the extension, and he wished whoever built the > chest had > used "primaries" up another octave or so. > >   In general, you can't change the wind pressure but just a very small = amount before there are negative side-effects, such as the ones you have noted. I =   have known other tuners who will increase windpressure slightly (say from = 4'" to 4 1/8'") to help stabilize tuning on organs with marginal wind = supplies. > sometimes< this helps sometimes not. Regarding pneumatic chests, a primary valve can help the speed of = repitition provided that it is properly designed and constructed. the larger ability = to dump/re-fill the pouch is the main benifit, but many e-p chests work fast enough using just a magnet to dump the pouch. The larger the pouch under = the toe-hole, the more beneficial the primary becomes (as a general rule).   As far as the sluggishness of the extention of the Bombarde being slow, it =   could be more of an issue than only primary being there (or not). there = are voicing factors that can make a reed slow(er) to speak/release...also the regulation (loudness/timbre) can affect the attack/release (mostly the attack) of a given reed pipe (or set for that matter)...mis-match of the scaling of the reeds/shallots/resonators can contribute to probelms with reeds especilly the attack characteristics. AND, some reeds are very sensitive to pressure changes, wind chest resonances, poor wind supply and = so on.   Hope this helps at least to understand the problem...these are things that =   MUST be left to professionals to fix.   Rick in VA   --part1_14a.1241f746.2a884975_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/2002 5:47:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, markkoontz@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">When our organ was = moved from its previous (smaller) location, the wind pressure <BR>was increased. &nbsp;I assume that this makes the pipes sound louder. = &nbsp;What are other <BR>consequences? &nbsp;I believe no revoicing was done. <BR> <BR>The swell has the original reservoir, which now has three cement = blocks on top. <BR>(Installation in our building required separating the swell and great, = so the <BR>great got a new reservoir.) <BR> <BR>The things I notice are: &nbsp;(1) the swell dynamic range barely gets = down to the <BR>mezzo-piano level; (2) the swell reed (Trompette) has taken on a harsh = character <BR>and refuses to stay in tune; (3) some notes on the 8' swell flute = sound a little <BR>overblown. <BR> <BR>Another question (or story for comment): &nbsp;The pedal reed = (Bombarde) was extended <BR>so that we could have an 8' reed in the great. &nbsp;It sounds really = nice, but the <BR>release is sluggish, making trills sound sloppy (I don't need help = with this) <BR>and making quick note repetitions impossible in the octave or so above = middle C. <BR>In examining the chest, the tuner indicated that there were = "primaries" only on <BR>the lowest two notes of the extension, and he wished whoever built the = chest had <BR>used "primaries" up another octave or so. <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>In general, you can't change the wind pressure but just a very small = amount before there are negative side-effects, such as the ones you have = noted. I have known other tuners who will increase windpressure slightly = (say from 4'" to 4 1/8'") to help stabilize tuning on organs with marginal = wind supplies. &gt;sometimes&lt; this helps sometimes not. <BR>Regarding pneumatic chests, a primary valve can help the speed of = repitition provided that it is properly designed and constructed. the = larger ability to dump/re-fill the pouch is the main benifit, but many e-p = chests work fast enough using just a magnet to dump the pouch. The larger = the pouch under the toe-hole, the more beneficial the primary becomes (as = a general rule). <BR> <BR>As far as the sluggishness of the extention of the Bombarde being = slow, it could be more of an issue than only primary being there (or not). = there are voicing factors that can make a reed slow(er) to = speak/release...also the regulation (loudness/timbre) can affect the = attack/release (mostly the attack) of a given reed pipe (or set for that = matter)...mis-match of the scaling of the reeds/shallots/resonators can = contribute to probelms with reeds especilly the attack characteristics. = AND, some reeds are very sensitive to pressure changes, wind chest = resonances, poor wind supply and so on. <BR> <BR>Hope this helps at least to understand the problem...these are things = that MUST be left to professionals to fix. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_14a.1241f746.2a884975_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 16:45:55 -0700     > Soooooooo.....new topic. > How was the music at everyone's church this morning?   An odd Sunday here at Forest Grove (Oregon) UCC (1979 Balcom & Vaughn = 2/33)   No prelude, but a preliminary singalong on 4 hymns/songs (Hallelujah!, = Glory to God!, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, and God Will Raise You Up). The = children did the introit, coming in with didgeredoos, and then did a play and sang = a Raffi song with Orff instruments. Cute.   Hymns were Festal Song (Arise, Your Light Is Come), I Am the Light of the World, and Sicilian Mariners (Lord, Dismiss Us...) Doxology was the last verse of Talavera Terrace (Take My Gifts). None of them real favorites, = but people were singing well. I switched to piano for I Am the Light of the World, faithfully respecting performance practice...   Offertory was Purvis Forest Green (reflecting the text All Beautiful the March of Days, as found in the Congregational hymnal. Any ex-Episcopalians might have been taken aback.) Postlude was the finale of Handel Concerto = No. 1, in the Dupr=E9 arrangement. No, I didn't play the left-hand runs on = pedal =E0 la Demessieux.   Southern Oregon is still ablaze, but here in the NW quarter of the state = it was a spectacular day, a little over 80, and maybe Perseids tonight if we can stay awake.   Michael Fox    
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 17:02:57 -0700     > on 8/11/02 1:26 PM, J. Nathan at jnatpat@infi.net wrote: > > Prelude: Choral Prelude on Seelenbrautigaum by Robert Elmore. I chose this > because we sang "Jesus Still Lead On", to that tune of course, as the second > hymn. (Unfortunately, I didn't look closely enough at the words: what = a > downer.) I like this Elmore piece--does anyone know it? I was = hesitating > between it and the Karg-Elert setting, but in the end opted for the = Elmore > because (1) I didn't want to have to wood-shed the Karg-Elert, and (2) I > figured the Elmore was more accessible to the congregation.   Yep. Gorgeous piece! But it sure wants some lush sounds to work right.   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: what we maybe SHOULD be talking about From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 20:19:31 EDT     --part1_15f.121a89b8.2a885913_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/02 5:24:50 AM !!!First Boot!!!, arpschneider@starband.net writes:     > Someplace in the middle of last weeks "discussions" I asked the list for > their input about their thoughts on drawknob layout on TERRACED > Consoles. > > Know how many responses I got? > > Two. > > And one of those from a builder-friend who I also wrote DIRECTLY with > the question. Good dialogue too. > > The other was from a person who said (in so many words): "I don't > frankly give a damn. So long as the organ has combination pistons, it >   Apparently you didn't get my message so I'll repost:   << I'm familiar with two different "schools" of layout thought and wanted to receive some opinions as to what people consider to be "better". >>   Better is what we are used to!! ;-)   I have played only small instrument with terraced layouts so don't have significant experience with larger instruments. However, the new Fisk = going in at First Presbyterian - GainesvilleFL uses a very comfortable appearing =   layout.   The stops of the pedal are on the bottom terrace on both sides, one side having the principal chorus, the other side having the reeds and flutes.   The stops of the Great are on two terraces on the right side with the principal chorus on one level and the flutes and reeds on the other.   The stops of the Positiv are on two terraces on the let side with the principal chorus on one level and the flutes and reeds on the other.   The stops of the Swell are divided on the top terrace, flutes and strings = on one side and principals and reeds on the other.   The couples are on the terraces adjacent to the manuals they effect and = are printed in a different color.   This is from memory so it might not be completely accurate. But I recall =   the set-up being extrememly comfortable, although I didn't have a chance = to experience how it felt.   For me, the most important part of any stop layout is having the stops grouped in families. This compensates a great deal for any variances = from console to console.     Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_15f.121a89b8.2a885913_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/02 5:24:50 AM !!!First Boot!!!, arpschneider@starband.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Someplace in the = middle of last weeks "discussions" I asked the list for <BR>their input about their thoughts on drawknob layout on TERRACED <BR>Consoles. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Know how many responses I got? <BR> <BR>Two. <BR> <BR>And one of those from a builder-friend who I also wrote DIRECTLY with <BR>the question. &nbsp;Good dialogue too. <BR> <BR>The other was from a person who said (in so many words): "I don't <BR>frankly give a damn. &nbsp;So long as the organ has combination = pistons, it <BR>really doesn't matter!"</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Apparently you didn't get my message so I'll repost: <BR> <BR>&lt;&lt; I'm familiar with two different "schools" of layout thought = and wanted <BR>to receive some opinions as to what people consider to be "better". = &nbsp;&gt;&gt; <BR> <BR>Better is what we are used to!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>I have played only small instrument with terraced layouts so don't = have significant experience with larger instruments. &nbsp;&nbsp;However, = the new Fisk going in at First Presbyterian - GainesvilleFL uses a very = comfortable appearing layout. <BR> <BR>The stops of the pedal are on the bottom terrace on both sides, one = side having the principal chorus, the other side having the reeds and = flutes. <BR> <BR>The stops of the Great are on two terraces on the right side with the principal chorus on one level and the flutes and reeds on the = other. <BR> <BR>The stops of the Positiv are on two terraces on the let side with the = principal chorus on one level and the flutes and reeds on the other. <BR> <BR>The stops of the Swell are divided on the top terrace, flutes and = strings on one side and principals and reeds on the other. <BR> <BR>The couples are on the terraces adjacent to the manuals they effect = and are printed in a different color. <BR> <BR>This is from memory so it might not be completely accurate. = &nbsp;&nbsp;But I recall the set-up being extrememly comfortable, although = I didn't have a chance to experience how it felt. <BR> <BR>For me, the most important part of any stop layout is having the stops = grouped in families. &nbsp;&nbsp;This compensates a great deal for any = variances from console to console. <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15f.121a89b8.2a885913_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: New Topics From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 20:35:38 EDT     --part1_45.1b928589.2a885cda_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/02 6:30:39 AM !!!First Boot!!!, = ctackett1@qwest.net writes:     > I would like to learn more about the repertoire (both concert and > liturgical) and how to actually play the instrument properly. > Does anyone have a list of recommended texts or compositions to broaden = my > (self) study of the instrument?   The early Bach pieces are good for starters, as well as works of Buxtehude =   which, in many cases, can be played manuals only with the pedal helping = out, thus allowing you to learn the pieces and then gradually incorporate the pedal part as you are able. One of the ways I used to begin pedal = facility was to go to various Bach pieces and simply play the pedal part, mostly sight-reading. Pedal scales in the Gleason Method were/are extremely helpful, even now (and I'm thirty years past study).   > Topic Two: Why does it seem to me that no one is ever happy or satisfied > with the instrument that they have?   I guess we can chalk that up to human nature and immaturity. I grew up = in the era when wonderful organs were being massacred and, fortunately, was never a part of such demise. I was also fortunate to study with teachers = who valued the instruments at their disposal, and one in particular who constantly lamented his one transgression against the lovely = AEolian-Skinner, that being the removal of the Vox!   Every organ can "need" something. Over the years, though, I have learned = to use an instrument's limitation to my advantage and have learned a great = deal with regard to registration and interpretation as a result.   Please stick with the list. It isn't always this bad! ;-)   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_45.1b928589.2a885cda_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/02 6:30:39 AM !!!First Boot!!!, ctackett1@qwest.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I would like to = learn more about the repertoire (both concert and liturgical) and how to = actually play the instrument properly. <BR>Does anyone have a list of recommended texts or compositions to = broaden my <BR>(self) study of the instrument? </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">The early Bach pieces are good for starters, as = well as works of Buxtehude which, in many cases, can be played manuals = only with the pedal helping out, thus allowing you to learn the pieces and = then gradually incorporate the pedal part as you are able. &nbsp;One of = the ways I used to begin pedal facility was to go to various Bach pieces = and simply play the pedal part, mostly sight-reading. &nbsp;&nbsp;Pedal = scales in the Gleason Method were/are extremely helpful, even now (and I'm = thirty years past study). <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Topic Two: Why = does it seem to me that no one is ever happy or satisfied <BR>with the instrument that they have? </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I guess we can chalk that up to human nature and immaturity. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I grew up in the era when wonderful organs were being = massacred and, fortunately, was never a part of such demise. &nbsp;I was = also fortunate to study with teachers who valued the instruments at their = disposal, and one in particular who constantly lamented his one = transgression against the lovely AEolian-Skinner, that being the removal of the Vox! &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Every organ can "need" something. &nbsp;&nbsp;Over the years, though, = I have learned to use an instrument's limitation to my advantage and have = learned a great deal with regard to registration and interpretation as a = result. <BR> <BR>Please stick with the list. &nbsp;It isn't always this bad! &nbsp;;-) <BR> &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_45.1b928589.2a885cda_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Playing a Hammond From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 19:43:15 -0500   If you hardly ever play a Hammond, I'd stick with a couple of ideas (This applies to traditional Hammonds with the famous Drawbars. Models that = don't have such I guess are best treated as other electronic organs of that = ilk). Remember that on the larger drawbar models--the most common in churches is the C3 which has the flat 25 note pedalboard--the lower "octave" on the keyboards--the black naturals and white sharps--are the "stopknobs." = Rather than worry about what they're called, remember that the higher "notes" are higher volume stops; as you get to the upper end 16' tone tends to make = them very muddy in the left hand. Also, most Hammonds are too loud in the bass to efficiently accompany the treble on the same manual, so keep the hands = on different manuals and register accordingly. The last two "notes" on each--the A# and B are the ones that turn on the appropriate sets of drawbars. NOTE: You cannot combine stops on a drawbar Hammond--if two or three get stuck down together, the "C" note is a cancel key.   The pedals are controlled by two drawbars--one for 16', one for 8'. Hammonds with 32 note pedalboards will also have a "pedal solo unit" controlled on the right lower keyboard cheek. These are in addition to = the drawbar pedals, but the solo unit will play only one note at a time.   You will also find a round knob controlling "chorus" and "vibrato." = Adjust as you wish, but remember this IS a Hammond; if there are Leslie speakers, they are usually controlled by switches mounted on the ends of the lower keyrail.   Good luck. Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God." ----- Original Message ----- Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 10:05:33 -0500   Hi list, I had to play on a Hammond Organ yesterday for a wedding and had and still have no clue on how to set them up. Help on that matter would = be appreciated. Thanks. Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: The Instrument We Have From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 21:05:11 EDT     --part1_167.121cb1b3.2a8863c7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I, for one, am quite pleased with the instrument I play. It was also = built by an Ohio firm...in 1995. Our organ does what it was designed to do, namely, lead in congregational singing, accompany choral literature, and provide decent renderings of organ repertory. It basically stays in tune =   with itself, even though it is a divided chancel/chamber installation; and =   whenever we have had any trouble with the instrument (which has been minimal), the builder has been prompt and gracious in correcting the = trouble.   The only 2 things I wish we could have afforded when the organ was built: = a 16' flute on the great and also a tremulant on the great. In the future, = I hope we can add a small division in the gallery, not merely for MORE = organ, but for additional colors and sonic interest.   I feel confident in saying that we have the best organ in the area. That = is a testament to our church's commitment to worship and to the builder's commitment to quality.   Neil Brown by the Beautiful Barnegat Bay     --part1_167.121cb1b3.2a8863c7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I, for one, am quite pleased with the instrument = I play.&nbsp; It was also built by an Ohio firm...in 1995.&nbsp; Our organ = does what it was designed to do, namely, lead in congregational singing, = accompany choral literature, and provide decent renderings of organ = repertory.&nbsp;&nbsp; It basically stays in tune with itself, even though = it is a divided chancel/chamber installation; and whenever we have had any = trouble with the instrument (which has been minimal), the builder has been = prompt and gracious in correcting the trouble.<BR> <BR> The only 2 things I wish we could have afforded when the organ was = built:&nbsp; a 16' flute on the great and also a tremulant on the = great.&nbsp; In the future, I hope we can add a small division in the = gallery, not merely for MORE organ, but for additional colors and sonic = interest.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> I feel confident in saying that we have the best organ in the area.&nbsp; = That is a testament to our church's commitment to worship and to the = builder's commitment to quality.<BR> <BR> Neil Brown<BR> by the Beautiful Barnegat Bay<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_167.121cb1b3.2a8863c7_boundary--