PipeChat Digest #3035 - Monday, August 12, 2002
 
Re: Effects of changing wind pressure, et al.
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: semi-new topic
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: semi-new topic
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
semi-new topic....
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
RE: semi-new topic
  by "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net>
Re: (no subject)
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Worshipful atmosphere
  by "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net>
Re: semi-new topic
  by "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infi.net>
Re: Worshipful atmosphere
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Rieger - Rieger-Kloss pipes
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: Worshipful atmosphere
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Worshipful atmosphere
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Worshipful atmosphere
  by "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org>
Re: semi-new topic
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Handel's Messiah
  by "Alex Oldroyd" <droydmaester@fastmail.fm>
Re: Handel's Messiah
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: New Topics
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: New Topics
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: New Topics
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: New Topics
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: semi-new topic
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Effects of changing wind pressure, et al. From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 13:48:24 +1200   There can be tongue-curvature problems in a reed stop that has had the = reeds put on higher pressure, too. If you raise the pressure, the pipe goes sharper, so then you have to flatten the tuning to get the right pitch. = This means the vibrating tongue is now longer and takes therefore longer to get going and to quit. Getting a reed voicer to re-curve the tongues may help, but don't, under any circumstances, try it yourself unless you are a = really skilled voicer, otherwise you may make thing a great deal worse.   In flue pipes, you will usually get a brighter sound if you increase the pressure a bit, as you are forcing more harmonics into the audible range, but on the other hand, you may well get bad speech problems like = overblowing (e.g. emphasising the wrong harmonics or going up to the next harmonic entirely) and weird transients. If you still feel you want to increase the pressure, do it in very tiny little bits, e.g. if the pressure was 3", try it first at 3 1/8", not at 3 7/8" or more. Ross     When our organ was moved from its previous (smaller) location, the = wind pressure was increased. I assume that this makes the pipes sound louder. What are other consequences? I believe no revoicing was done.   The swell has the original reservoir, which now has three cement = blocks on top. (Installation in our building required separating the swell and great, so the great got a new reservoir.)   The things I notice are: (1) the swell dynamic range barely gets down to the mezzo-piano level; (2) the swell reed (Trompette) has taken on a harsh character and refuses to stay in tune; (3) some notes on the 8' swell flute = sound a little overblown.   Another question (or story for comment): The pedal reed (Bombarde) = was extended so that we could have an 8' reed in the great. It sounds really nice, but the release is sluggish, making trills sound sloppy (I don't need help = with this) and making quick note repetitions impossible in the octave or so above middle C. In examining the chest, the tuner indicated that there were = "primaries" only on the lowest two notes of the extension, and he wished whoever built the chest had used "primaries" up another octave or so.         In general, you can't change the wind pressure but just a very small amount before there are negative side-effects, such as the ones you have noted. I have known other tuners who will increase windpressure slightly (say from 4'" to 4 1/8'") to help stabilize tuning on organs with marginal wind supplies. >sometimes< this helps sometimes not. Regarding pneumatic chests, a primary valve can help the speed of repitition provided that it is properly designed and constructed. the = larger ability to dump/re-fill the pouch is the main benifit, but many e-p chests work fast enough using just a magnet to dump the pouch. The larger the = pouch under the toe-hole, the more beneficial the primary becomes (as a general rule).   As far as the sluggishness of the extention of the Bombarde being slow, = it could be more of an issue than only primary being there (or not). there = are voicing factors that can make a reed slow(er) to speak/release...also the regulation (loudness/timbre) can affect the attack/release (mostly the attack) of a given reed pipe (or set for that matter)...mis-match of the scaling of the reeds/shallots/resonators can contribute to probelms with reeds especilly the attack characteristics. AND, some reeds are very sensitive to pressure changes, wind chest resonances, poor wind supply and so on.      
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 21:26:09 -0400   on 8/11/02 8:02 PM, M Fox at ophicleide16@direcway.com wrote:   > >> on 8/11/02 1:26 PM, J. Nathan at jnatpat@infi.net wrote: >> >> Prelude: Choral Prelude on Seelenbrautigaum by Robert Elmore. I chose > this >> because we sang "Jesus Still Lead On", to that tune of course, as the > second >> hymn. (Unfortunately, I didn't look closely enough at the words: what = a >> downer.) I like this Elmore piece--does anyone know it? I was = hesitating >> between it and the Karg-Elert setting, but in the end opted for the = Elmore >> because (1) I didn't want to have to wood-shed the Karg-Elert, and (2) = I >> figured the Elmore was more accessible to the congregation. > > Yep. Gorgeous piece! But it sure wants some lush sounds to work right. > > MAF   Hi, glad to hear from someone who knows the piece. Well, my instrument is moderately lush. I used voix celeste in the swell (Elmore just says "strings," doesn't specify celeste, though; for the first service I just registered it dulciana; decided to juice it up for the second service with the celeste) and a nice deep-sounding Krummhorn from the choir balanced against it on the first page, and then my Clarabella is a lovely flute on the Great where that's called for on the second page. When the swell is = to increase I put in the viola 8', later the stopped diapason 8'. Builds nicely in the middle section; I put in my two Great 8' diapasons and a 4' octave, eventually the mixture, and later the crescendo pedal all the way (which still doesn't put everything on). Calls for chime or a harp as you know when it ends quietly. I have both, but opted for the chime.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: semi-new topic From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 20:31:46 -0500   Thanks so much for contributing to a change in the subject. You guys are supposed to be helping people like me stay interested in the organ, not drive me away.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: semi-new topic.... From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 21:37:20 -0500   It was almost the same ole same ole for me this morning as well. I had not been advised that a singing group was coming in to do kareoke (such loverly voices too, each one had their own microphone). So I scrapped the Prelude and Offertory.   Later this week I'm interviewing for a post at a church that's looking for an organist/pianist for their "Traditional Service". Only bad thing about it, it's 8am in the morning. So much for sleeping in late on Sunday anymore.   I wonder if churches that use the CD stuff for accompaniment realize that each time they do, the take away an opportunity for an individual or real group to perform. I bet in a few more years, we won't have any piano/organ students left. Why learn something that it appears no one is interested in listening to in church?   One surprising thing that did happen....the leader of the group said she got goosebumps listening to the organ. She said I played just like a real catherdral organist...hmmm I guess I need more practice! <G>     Jon Bertschinger   p.s. comments and flames welcomed on this matter.  
(back) Subject: RE: semi-new topic From: "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 22:49:19 -0400   Subject: semi-new topic From: "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infi.net> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 12:26:46 -0500   How was the music at everyone's church this morning? How did you play? Any funny/touching/embarassing stories....   Okay, here I go saying the same old thing again. For "special music" this morning, the ladies trio sang to CD accompaniment (country-gospel style, = in my best estimation). Well, partway through the song, the CD player just = up and quits. The ladies finished the verse sans music (it was the best part of the whole song), then stopped and asked the sound man to "start it back up at number 51." In the ensuing silence, several trite comments were called out from the congregation (and the trio). During the whole silly episode, I kept looking at the organ, thinking to myself, well, the organ has been working fine all morning; I wonder if, perchance, they could have used some live accompaniment. But the organ has not been used to = accompany a soloist or small choral group; EVER! I have an unspoken plan to = sometime start a separate choir of my own where "good" worship music could be sung (with organ accompaniment, of course). Perhaps I could even persuade a = few soloists to sing with the organ (I honestly don't think our congregation even knows that this can be done!). Sorry to spout off again, folks, but thanks for asking.   Regards, Jonathan Humbert Organist Word of Life Chapel Bainbridge, PA    
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 21:50:10 -0500   Pipes go "flat" when toe holes are closed, and "sharp" when opened. There may be other reasons for tuning problems that you mention however. make sure the wind pressure is steady. Some wicks we used to service (and finally rebuilt) had individual regulators all over the place. The nature of their construction made them inaccurate in pressure control. Now that 8 little regulators have been replaced, we don't have the tuning problems that once were. (once were??,..midwesting showing again <G>).     Jon Bertschinger Tonal Director Temple Organs Saint Joseph, MO (North kansas city area)  
(back) Subject: Worshipful atmosphere From: "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 23:10:53 -0400   Just to follow up my post, what do people feel about clapping during services? I mean during the morning service after the special music, specifically. Of course, it's not every time: just when the song was snappy with a lot of harp glissandos, plenty of cymbal crashes and the driving bass guitar line (I am speaking of canned accompaniment). I think there are several people whose clap merely because no one used to clap in the past ("it is the 21st century, you know, the church is changing"). I discussed this with my wife and commented that if the clapping was = heartfelt gratitude for the stirring message of the song, shouldn't they also clap when the pastor has a good sermon or when a particularly profound hymn has just been sung. My point is this: I see all that goes on in a worship service should be just that, worshipful. There's a lot of talk about "relaxing" in church (you know, "chilling out"). I just think that = worship of the Creator ought to be a bit more holy, reverent and awe-full (pun definitely not intended). Sorry to be rambling on, but when I hear GOOD sacred organ music my thoughts tend to rise toward a point much higher = than myself, my surrounding or the everyday, mundanity of life. Maybe I'm = alone, but I think this is the whole point of what we do (not to mention "the = chief end of man").   Regards, Jonathan Humbert Organist Word of Life Chapel Bainbridge, PA    
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infi.net> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 22:42:32 -0500   THANK you all for such a great response...now, wasn't that fun? We got = to share, tell stories, laugh, shake our heads in embarassment for a = collegue, and share our gift of music with those that are needy in one form or another.... And to think ...we all told our stories without arguement, ridicule, or condescension. I had such a great evening reading about each of your musical lives. I appreciated the time you took to share your day with the rest of us.   That wasn't painful, now, was it! <G>   Have a great week!   JNathan Organist/Choirmaster St. Peter's of the Lakes Episcopal Organist/SubChoirmaster FUMC Paducah, Kentucky.      
(back) Subject: Re: Worshipful atmosphere From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 23:48:30 EDT     --part1_42.2b9e7751.2a888a0e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > shouldn't they also clap when the pastor has a good sermon or when a > particularly profound hymn has just been sung   I have been in worship experiences where both of these were done. = Clapping in and of itself is not a problem...it is a natural expression. I think = the problem lies in "applause".   It's quite clear from scripture that clapping was a part of Jewish worship =   tradition. I don't mean to suggest that it was "applause" as we know it. =   And, in quite a number of Christian traditions clapping to the beat of the =   music is an inherent element of worship practice.   I'm wondering if clapping is the modern day version of "saying amen"? Not =   that it means the same, don't misunderstand me.   Neil by the Bay   --part1_42.2b9e7751.2a888a0e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">shouldn't they = also clap when the pastor has a good sermon or when a particularly = profound hymn has just been sung</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> I have been in worship experiences where both of these were done.&nbsp; = Clapping in and of itself is not a problem...it is a natural = expression.&nbsp; I think the problem lies in "applause".&nbsp; <BR> <BR> It's quite clear from scripture that clapping was a part of Jewish worship = tradition.&nbsp; I don't mean to suggest that it was "applause" as we know = it.&nbsp; And, in quite a number of Christian traditions clapping to the = beat of the music is an inherent element of worship practice.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> I'm wondering if clapping is the modern day version of "saying = amen"?&nbsp; Not that it means the same, don't misunderstand me.&nbsp; = <BR> <BR> Neil by the Bay<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_42.2b9e7751.2a888a0e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Rieger - Rieger-Kloss pipes From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 21:14:16 -0700       Icedad@aol.com wrote: > > Dear Stan, > > If you will notice from my post that we do INDEED have real > pipe ranks which were made by Rieger.   snip   I believe your pipes were made by Rieger-Kloss and NOT Rieger. These are two totally different, unrelated firms.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College (location of a 4-85 Rieger, not a Rieger-Kloss!)  
(back) Subject: Re: Worshipful atmosphere From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 00:13:00 EDT   Dear Jonathan:   I think you have it right all the way around. The music is the means, but the soul is the vehicle. What the music does to raise the mind is all important. The musician uses the physical instrument to raise the soul to the spiritual and the mystical.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Worshipful atmosphere From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 16:47:04 +1200   I agree with you. It was plain horrible here at the rather conservative = 8am Service (NZ Anglican) when the clergy led the congregation in clapping = after a 40-year-old man was baptised. At least no one has begun clapping the = Vicar after he says the prayer at the end of Holy Communion. Heaven forfend (to use a wonderful old word). Ross   >Just to follow up my post, what do people feel about clapping during >services? I mean during the morning service after the special music, >specifically.    
(back) Subject: Re: Worshipful atmosphere From: "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 23:37:48 -0500   At 11:10 PM 8/11/02 -0400, you wrote: >just been sung. My point is this: I see all that goes on in a worship >service should be just that, worshipful. There's a lot of talk about >"relaxing" in church (you know, "chilling out"). I just think that = worship >of the Creator ought to be a bit more holy, reverent and awe-full (pun   what makes any music worshipful? in a hymn the lyrics point us toward God but in an instrumental piece, is it just a matter of taste? there may be some who would just as soon forget worship and have a nice Sunday morning entertainment, and for some it might just be the music they understand, all you have to do is ask what they listen to in the car, often that is a reflection of their musical vocabulary, and they may need to be educated to understand other types of music. [which it seems is part of an organist duty]   but the question remains, what makes instrumental music worshipful? some years ago, a pietist declared, if you enjoy the music it is entertainment and not worship I'm not certain I agree with this as it would mean all the time I listen to Bach, which I enjoy greatly I am being entertained, and only when listening to French Romantics (or modern disonance) neither of which I particularly enjoy would the music be worshipful somehow that strikes me as funny,   as for clapping, I would prefer if it not occur not during worhsip, when we should be focusing on God, if there is something that you find particularly moving it would seem apropriate to thank God for giving such gifts to these = people and to thank the people after the worship you know, let all theings be done decently and in order.         Regards, Richard Jordan   http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com http://www.OnJordansBanks.com  
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 00:39:19 -0400       Glenda wrote: > > Thanks so much for contributing to a change in the subject. You guys > are supposed to be helping people like me stay interested in the organ, > not drive me away. > > Glenda Sutton   That's what a chauffeur does sometimes, Glenda :) :) :) Have a good work week.   Stan   "..so what about those Cassavants this year?"    
(back) Subject: Handel's Messiah From: "Alex Oldroyd" <droydmaester@fastmail.fm> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 22:59:35 -0600   I have been asked to accompany a 60 person choir which will perform some selections (Hallelujah Chorus, For Unto Us a Child is Given, Glory to God = in the Highest) from Handel's Messiah. Does anyone know where to find the ORGAN score for these?   Thanks! -Alex    
(back) Subject: Re: Handel's Messiah From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 22:01:06 -0700   G Schirmer published one; I think Peters (Hinrichsen?) published another. I just play it from the old Schirmer vocal score I learned it from originally, with the pedalling marked in and the things hightlighted that I play.   Cheers,   Bud   P.S. - any relation to the composer George Oldroyd? One of my favorites .... (grin) ... sing his Masses, play his organ music.   Alex Oldroyd wrote: > > I have been asked to accompany a 60 person choir which will perform some > selections (Hallelujah Chorus, For Unto Us a Child is Given, Glory to = God in > the Highest) from Handel's Messiah. Does anyone know where to find the > ORGAN score for these? > > Thanks! > -Alex > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: New Topics From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 01:28:11 EDT     --part1_18.23999aa2.2a88a16b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Chris, welcome to the chat. Do you have a copy of Gleason's Method of = Organ Playing? There is a good list of music there. Also, If you want, I have listed all my collection of music from the past 51 years of being a church =   organist. (I just remembered that another year has past.) Please email = me off chat if you would like to have the lists. I would be more than happy = to send them to you. Lee   --part1_18.23999aa2.2a88a16b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Chris, welcome to the = chat. &nbsp;Do you have a copy of Gleason's Method of Organ Playing? = &nbsp;There is a good list of music there. &nbsp;Also, If you want, I have = listed all my collection of music from the past 51 years of being a church = organist. &nbsp;(I just remembered that another year has past.) = &nbsp;Please email me off chat if you would like to have the lists. = &nbsp;I would be more than happy to send them to you. = &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18.23999aa2.2a88a16b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: New Topics From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 01:31:44 EDT     --part1_1a5.69b8913.2a88a240_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Chris, by the way, I also play a 2 manual Allen 300C which has been = updated. If God put me there, then I am supposed to be happy with what is there, = but that does not mean I can't mention the pros and cons of a pipe organ. Of course, they always end up on deaf ears. I am quite comfortable with the =   Allen, having played it for 16 years now. I would also love to have an Artiste in my home, but I live in an apartment right now. As everyone = else knows, I have an old WurliTzer from the 50's with AGO pedals. I look = forward to your posts. You have some good ideas. Lee   --part1_1a5.69b8913.2a88a240_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Chris, by the way, = &nbsp;I also play a 2 manual Allen 300C which has been updated. &nbsp;If = God put me there, then I am supposed to be happy with what is there, but = that does not mean I can't mention the pros and cons of a pipe organ. = &nbsp;Of course, they always end up on deaf ears. &nbsp;&nbsp;I am quite = comfortable with the Allen, having played it for 16 years now. &nbsp;I = would also love to have an Artiste in my home, but I live in an apartment = right now. &nbsp;As everyone else knows, I have an old WurliTzer from the = 50's with AGO pedals. &nbsp;I look forward to your posts. &nbsp;You have = some good ideas. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a5.69b8913.2a88a240_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: New Topics From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 01:35:05 EDT     --part1_9f.2b9a60a0.2a88a309_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Stan, I took piano lessons for 8 years before my teacher would let me take =   organ lessons. Of course, my legs would not reach the pedals until then. =   But a good background in piano was a prerequisite to taking organ in = college. It is good to study the Bach 2 and 3 part inventions, as preparations for =   the fugues. Lee   --part1_9f.2b9a60a0.2a88a309_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Stan, I took piano = lessons for 8 years before my teacher would let me take organ lessons. = &nbsp;Of course, my legs would not reach the pedals until then. &nbsp;But = a good background in piano was a prerequisite to taking organ in college. = &nbsp;It is good to study the Bach 2 and 3 part inventions, as = preparations for the fugues. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9f.2b9a60a0.2a88a309_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: New Topics From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 02:22:34 EDT     --part1_106.16732c8f.2a88ae2a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I usually learn the manual parts of new music on the piano before putting = it on the organ. For some reason, this helps with my organ technique. Then = I learn the "traditional" way, LH and ped, RH and ped, LH and RH, and then = all together. I was taught this way many years ago, and still use if for ambitious music. Lee   --part1_106.16732c8f.2a88ae2a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I usually learn the = manual parts of new music on the piano before putting it on the organ. = &nbsp;For some reason, this helps with my organ technique. &nbsp;Then I = learn the "traditional" way, LH and ped, RH and ped, LH and RH, and then = all together. &nbsp;I was taught this way many years ago, and still use if = for ambitious music. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_106.16732c8f.2a88ae2a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2002 02:35:01 EDT     --part1_47.215e4e0b.2a88b115_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I played music from the Organ Portfolio, some "warmed overs," due to the limited time I had to prepare for the service. The only "bleep" was that = one of the choruses we sandwich in between the traditional hymns was written = in Db and the pianist started it in D. As I had a feeling this might happen, = I quietly hit a D chord, and there I was. We play most of the choruses from =   lead sheets and with guitar, so the guitar player chooses the key, but = seldom lets me know. Luckily, I can usually tell what key he is in. I didn't = even drop the hymn book onto the pedals this morning, taking the sheets from = the loose leaf hymnal. I used to put all the music in a loose leaf folder = with plastic music covers, but now we go so fast from one song and/or hymn, it = is easier to spread them out on the rack. A plus for the stops on the sides = is that the "levers" above the manuals does make the organ rack higher, especially when the organ is installed on the level of the podium and = choir loft. I am going to try mirrors, and like the idea of the convex mirror = used in the store for security. Now to find a convenient place for it. Any suggestions? As said before, all I can see from the console are the = balcony windows. Lee   --part1_47.215e4e0b.2a88b115_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I played music from the = Organ Portfolio, some "warmed overs," due to the limited time I had to = prepare for the service. &nbsp;The only "bleep" was that one of the = choruses we sandwich in between the traditional hymns was written in Db = and the pianist started it in D. &nbsp;As I had a feeling this might = happen, I quietly hit a D chord, and there I was. &nbsp;We play most of = the choruses from lead sheets and with guitar, so the guitar player = chooses the key, but seldom lets me know. &nbsp;Luckily, I can usually = tell what key he is in. &nbsp;I didn't even drop the hymn book onto the = pedals this morning, taking the sheets from the loose leaf hymnal. &nbsp;I = used to put all the music in a loose leaf folder with plastic music = covers, but now we go so fast from one song and/or hymn, it is easier to = spread them out on the rack. &nbsp;A plus for the stops on the sides is = that the "levers" above the manuals does make the organ rack higher, = especiall   --part1_47.215e4e0b.2a88b115_boundary--