PipeChat Digest #3043 - Tuesday, August 13, 2002
 
Re: Last Sunday
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Last Sunday
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Re.: what maybe we SHOULD be tal;king about
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: semi-new topic
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Re.: what maybe we SHOULD be talking about
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: what we maybe SHOULD be talking about
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Alternative practice instruments
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Suggestion for new topic:Alternative practice instruments
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
"designed by"
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Organs at Home
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
reed organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:18:13 EDT     --part1_64.23897771.2a8aedb5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Paul, It's not analog, but it one of the very early digitals. Here is what was =   accomplished today.   There's no reason to substitute the Chimes for a Mixture III, since the = last thing the digi- needs is another mixture, so why spend the money.   We can't add channels... this is a two-channel job using a "universal" board. We can add speakers but that would just put more sound up front. =     It was suggested that I turn the speakers around so that they face away = from the congregation, thus taking the edge off of the mixture and reed. I'll =   give it a shot. Whom knows?   The other suggestion was, rather than adding two speakers in the front, to =   add four presence projectors in the coves in the nave. This would give the =   sound more presence in the entire room and make it more even throughout, = also allowing me to turn down the gain and eliminate some of the harshness.   We turned down the bass on the Bourdon 16 and Basson 16. The Bourdon is much better, but the Basson is still butt-ugly and sounds like a very bad Trumpet. The reduced midrange response helped the Trompet and the Spitzprincipal 4 on the Swell a bit. I think that's about all we can = do. Oh to have three ranks of pipes!!! ;-)   Basically, now it's playable and a bit more pleasant than before. = Adjusting the Principal 8 and Octave 4 to the correct volume has rendered the = Mixture IV, Basson 16 and Trompete 8 so loud as to be unusable for services. It's = no great loss.... the room is too small to handle stops like these. A properly designed small instrument would have an Oboe and a Clarinet, and possibly a quiet trumpet. I'd rather have the principals, flutes and strings at their very best, and live without the mixtures and reeds.   The stoplist is: Great: Principal 8, Gedeckt 8, Violas II 8 (sw), Octave 4, Koppelflote 4 (sw), Superoctave 2, Mixture IV, Trompete 8 (sw), Chimes Swell: Bourdon 16 (ped), Gedeckt 8, Violas II 8, Viola Celeste 8, Spitzprincipal 4, Koppelflote 4, Nasat 2-2/3, Blockflote 2, Basson 16, Trompette 8. Pedal: Bourdon 16, Lieblich Gedeckt 16, Octave 8, Gedeckt 8, Choral Bass = 4, Bassoon 16, Trompete 8     Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_64.23897771.2a8aedb5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Paul, <BR>It's not analog, but it one of the very early digitals. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Here is what was accomplished today. <BR> <BR>There's no reason to substitute the Chimes for a Mixture III, since = the last thing the digi- needs is another mixture, so why spend the money. <BR> <BR>We can't add channels... &nbsp;this is a two-channel job using a = "universal" board. &nbsp;&nbsp;We can add speakers but that would just put = more sound up front. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>It was suggested that I turn the speakers around so that they face = away from the congregation, thus taking the edge off of the mixture and = reed. &nbsp;&nbsp;I'll give it a shot. &nbsp;Whom knows? <BR> <BR>The other suggestion was, rather than adding two speakers in the = front, to add four presence projectors in the coves in the nave. This = would give the sound more presence in the entire room and make it more = even throughout, also allowing me to turn down the gain and eliminate some = of the harshness. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>We turned down the bass on the Bourdon 16 and Basson 16. = &nbsp;&nbsp;The Bourdon is much better, but the Basson is still butt-ugly = and sounds like a very bad Trumpet. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The reduced midrange = response helped the Trompet and the Spitzprincipal 4 on the Swell a bit. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I think that's about all we can do. Oh to have three = ranks of pipes!!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Basically, now it's playable and a bit more pleasant than before. &nbsp;&nbsp;Adjusting the Principal 8 and Octave 4 to the correct volume has = rendered the Mixture IV, Basson 16 and Trompete 8 so loud as to be = unusable for services. &nbsp;It's no great loss.... the room is too small = to handle stops like these. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A properly designed small = instrument would have an Oboe and a Clarinet, and possibly a quiet = trumpet. &nbsp;&nbsp;I'd rather have the principals, flutes and strings at = their very best, and live without the mixtures and reeds. <BR> <BR>The stoplist is: <BR>Great: &nbsp;Principal 8, Gedeckt 8, Violas II 8 (sw), Octave 4, = Koppelflote 4 (sw), Superoctave 2, Mixture IV, Trompete 8 (sw), Chimes <BR>Swell: &nbsp;Bourdon 16 (ped), Gedeckt 8, Violas II 8, Viola Celeste = 8, Spitzprincipal 4, Koppelflote 4, Nasat 2-2/3, Blockflote 2, Basson 16, = Trompette 8. <BR>Pedal: &nbsp;Bourdon 16, Lieblich Gedeckt 16, Octave 8, Gedeckt 8, = Choral Bass 4, Bassoon 16, Trompete 8 <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_64.23897771.2a8aedb5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:18:43 EDT     --part1_d6.1ac80a6f.2a8aedd3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/13/02 2:22:08 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:     >       Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_d6.1ac80a6f.2a8aedd3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/13/02 2:22:08 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#800000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">Oh brother. What nonsense, maybe you should get a = Johannus</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d6.1ac80a6f.2a8aedd3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Re.: what maybe we SHOULD be tal;king about From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:30:35 EDT     --part1_cc.10091bf9.2a8af09b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/02 11:02:17 AM !!!First Boot!!!, aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com writes:     > Now that we are seeing more and more of these > consoles, it would be helpful if a number of > KNOWLEDGABLE people could get together and adopt some > definite standards as to how these layouts should be, > and builders should stick to them, regardless of what >   I can see the possible advantage of "defnite standards" but also enjoy the =   variance among builders. No one way is going to be "perfect." As long = as the arrangement is logical it should not be difficult to become = comfortable with a short period of time. It just does not seem that = "standardization" is something that is necessary in a work of art. I enjoy variety and especially the opportunity for learning and new experiences that arises therefrom. I've not yet found a console that was difficult to become comfortable with, including Washington Cathedral. The Flentrop at Duke University was not a problem, although my arms are not long enough for = quick stop changes!!! Having standardized stop arrangements is almost as unattractive to me as having standardized temperaments! Each organ = DESERVES the opportunity to be unique.   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_cc.10091bf9.2a8af09b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/02 11:02:17 AM !!!First Boot!!!, aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Now that we are = seeing more and more of these <BR>consoles, it would be helpful if a number of <BR>KNOWLEDGABLE people could get together and adopt some <BR>definite standards as to how these layouts should be, <BR>and builders should stick to them, regardless of what <BR>the "experts" demand.</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I can see the possible advantage of "defnite standards" but also enjoy = the variance among builders. &nbsp;&nbsp;No one way is going to be = "perfect." &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;As long as the arrangement is logical it = should not be difficult to become comfortable with a short period of time. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It just does not seem that "standardization" is something that = is necessary in a work of art. &nbsp;&nbsp;I enjoy variety and especially = the opportunity for learning and new experiences that arises therefrom. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I've not yet found a console that was difficult to = become comfortable with, including Washington Cathedral. &nbsp;&nbsp;The = Flentrop at Duke University was not a problem, although my arms are not = long enough for quick stop changes!!! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Having = standardized stop arrangements is almost as unattractive to me as having = standardized temperaments! &nbsp;&nbsp;Each organ DESERVES the opportunity = to be unique. <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_cc.10091bf9.2a8af09b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: semi-new topic From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:30:40 EDT     --part1_fb.2ab0b27d.2a8af0a0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/02 8:37:52 PM !!!First Boot!!!, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes:     > "Fresh" from Holland followed by a 100 mile drive, I fell asleep in the > middle of a hymn this morning! > > I immediately awoke and continued to play total grabage until the end of =   >   I guess that would be called avant garbage!! How was your trip to = Holland? Any interesting organs/recitals, etc....?   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_fb.2ab0b27d.2a8af0a0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/02 8:37:52 PM !!!First Boot!!!, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">"Fresh" from = Holland followed by a 100 mile drive, I fell asleep in the middle of a = hymn this morning! <BR> <BR>I immediately awoke and continued to play total grabage until the end = of the verse.............</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I guess that would be called avant garbage!! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;How was = your trip to Holland? &nbsp;&nbsp;Any interesting organs/recitals, = etc....? <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_fb.2ab0b27d.2a8af0a0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Re.: what maybe we SHOULD be talking about From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:30:34 EDT     --part1_5f.2b8e3142.2a8af09a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/02 10:31:10 AM !!!First Boot!!!, aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com writes:     > I have been involved with many installations when, at > the dedicatory recital, the program would proudly > proclaim that "The organ was DESIGNED by Mr. _____", > when in fact Mr. _____ simply drew up a stoplist and > didn't have the foggiest clue as to how to lay out an > organ.   I've always been amused by these notes, especially when the stoplist is almost exactly like almost every other comparable instrument built within = a five year period!   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_5f.2b8e3142.2a8af09a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/02 10:31:10 AM !!!First Boot!!!, aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I have been = involved with many installations when, at <BR>the dedicatory recital, the program would proudly <BR>proclaim that "The organ was DESIGNED by Mr. _____", <BR>when in fact Mr. _____ simply drew up a stoplist and <BR>didn't have the foggiest clue as to how to lay out an <BR>organ. &nbsp;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I've always been amused by these notes, especially when the stoplist = is almost exactly like almost every other comparable instrument built = within a five year period! <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_5f.2b8e3142.2a8af09a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: what we maybe SHOULD be talking about From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:30:39 EDT     --part1_16b.12168c76.2a8af09f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/11/02 7:42:23 PM !!!First Boot!!!, Chicaleee@aol.com writes:     > And I don't know about the working of a pipe organ, or electronic = organ. I > know enough to be dangerous. I am going to copy your list and do some > research on the topics, and ask questions when I am stumped.   The fact that you know enough to be dangerous is countered by the fact = that you know enough to ask questions when you are stumped. You can learn a great deal about pipe organ workings by reading about them and talking = about them with others who know more. But when you are ready to move on, or = find that you are stumped, seeking the advice of an organ builder is = invaluable. Most often, they are so passionate about their work that they will inadvertently share more with you than you anticipated. They're really, = for the most part, a fine group of people.   <Maybe this old "dog" can learn some new tricks. Old dogs CAN learn new tricks.... they've just learned that it's not = usually worth the trouble!! ;-) (from "Wisdom of the Baskerbeagles" by Miles = d' Baskerbeagle )       Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_16b.12168c76.2a8af09f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/11/02 7:42:23 PM !!!First Boot!!!, Chicaleee@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> And I don't know = about the working of a pipe organ, or electronic organ. &nbsp;I know = enough to be dangerous. &nbsp;I am going to copy your list and do some = research on the topics, and ask questions when I am stumped. = &nbsp;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0">The fact that you know enough to be dangerous is = countered by the fact that you know enough to ask questions when you are = stumped. &nbsp;&nbsp;You can learn a great deal about pipe organ workings = by reading about them and talking about them with others who know more. = &nbsp;&nbsp;But when you are ready to move on, or find that you are = stumped, seeking the advice of an organ builder is invaluable. &nbsp;Most = often, they are so passionate about their work that they will = inadvertently share more with you than you anticipated. &nbsp;They're = really, for the most part, a fine group of people. <BR> <BR>&lt;Maybe this old "dog" can learn some new tricks. </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0">Old dogs CAN learn new tricks.... &nbsp;they've = just learned that it's not usually worth the trouble!! &nbsp;;-) = &nbsp;&nbsp;(from &nbsp;"Wisdom of the Baskerbeagles" &nbsp;by Miles d' = Baskerbeagle ) <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_16b.12168c76.2a8af09f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Alternative practice instruments From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 16:35:14 -0700   I've had all kinds of practice organs over the years, including an Estey.   As I recall, the Estey "student" models (only two or three sets of reeds over two manuals and a 30-note [?] pedal-board) MIGHT have had a self-contained blower, but the Estey CHURCH reed organs usually required an external Orgoblo, unless the original electrical cranking mechanism for the feeder bellows was intact. That made for problems unless you had a large house and a basement or an attic and a sound-proofed enclosure for the blower, having to run a wind-line, etc.   Estey DID make a 2 manual and pedal reed organ with ELECTRO-PNEUMATIC stop and key action, the E-PRO or E-PROM, but those are VERY rare and the last one I priced was going for U.S. $18K restored, which would ALMOST get you a small NEW electronic in most areas of the US.   I've been on the lookout for YEARS for a 2 manual AND PEDAL Mustel harmonium from France ... I've found a couple of two MANUAL ones, but never with PEDALS. And again, the asking price was high ... Mustels were very expensive even in their day.   Frankly, I've never had any problem picking up AGO-console used electronics for $500 or less, if not for FREE. "You want it? Come haul it off!" (grin)   If ALL you want is a practice machine and don't care about the SOUND, as long as the key and pedal action is reasonable, just about ANYTHING will do, as long as all the notes play ... Baldwin (as long as it's the generation AFTER the Model 5 with its squishy key contacts), Wurlitzer, Conn, Hammond Concert Model (though the pedals are a LITTLE off), Hammond Model E (if you can find one ... the best Hammond ever made), or an older analog Rodgers or Allen (you just have to watch for the non-AGO "princess pedals" on some Allen models).   Several friends of mine have AGO-console THEATRE organs for practice organs ... older, discontinued models ... Baldwin, Conn, Gulbransen, Rodgers and Allen all made them at one time ... there were probably others.   Don't discount having an organ shipped from somewhere else, either ... one dealer friend of mine ships organs all over the country and still manages to keep the price reasonable. There are several big stores that do that ... there's one in Orlando; my friend is in San Diego; I think there's one "up east" as well. Check The Church Organ Trader.   Cheers,   Bud       Patricia/Thomas Gregory wrote: > > Greetings: > > I am sure there are many organists who find it difficult to practice due = to > travel distance, un-airconditioned buildings, and locations where = heating > costs prohibit maintaining comfortable temperatures. > > It is a "given" that most of us cannot afford a small pipe organ or an = AGO > standard electronic substitute. > > Does anyone on Pipechat use AGO standard two manual/pedal American reed > organs or European harmoniums for home practice? > > Estey, along with other American companies, manufactured instruments = that > are ideal for practice purposes. > > Best wishes, > > Tom Gregory > > -- > Thomas and Patricia Gregory > 716 West College Avenue > Waukesha WI USA > 53186-4569 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Suggestion for new topic:Alternative practice instruments From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 19:31:28 EDT   A long time ago I played for a couple years in a small Episcopal church on =   Long Island that had a 2m Estey with an electric blower. It wasn't much = fun, and there really was no variety in the sound. The little 1920-something 2m =   Moller I played at the Lutheran church up the street wasn't much better.   If you're willing to settle for less-than-new, I think an AGO console electronic is within reach of many if not most organists, for about what a =   modest upright piano costs new today. It took a while to track one down, = but I have a 2m self-contained Rodgers in my tiny apartment that is just fine = for practice -- if I only felt inclined to practice more often. It's limited, = but not boring, as far as registrations, but it does the job well and I = actually prefer it to some of the things you wind up playing in churches of both = the electronic and pipe persuasions. And it's a lot more convenient on a = Saturday than having to drive out to a church and try to get in. The voicing on = mine is pretty gentle and I've never had a complaint from the neighbors.   I bought it from the original owner, who had taken good care of it. From = the time he had it moved out and I had made room for it, it was in the = showroom of the local Rodgers dealer and generated a lot of interest. Some of the dealers have web sites listing previously-played instruments, often at = very good prices.   It's obviously not the solution for everyone, but it has proven to be just =   fine for me. David in DC.  
(back) Subject: "designed by" From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 16:46:13 -0700   One of the ODDEST organs I ever played had a PLAQUE proclaiming that a well-known organist (of an earlier generation) had designed AND voiced the instrument.   Now, here's the oddity: said organist had presided for MANY years over an organ that is universally considered a national TREASURE of the American Classic period. It is INVARIABLY mentioned in all the books.   Yet THIS organ, which he allegedly designed and voiced, and which was built by a respected middle-of-the-road builder, was harsh and raucous in the EXTREME ... NOTHING like the organ he played Sunday by Sunday. And it wasn't a matter of American Classic vs. neo-baroque ... the STOPLIST *read* as if it should have SOUNDED like the famous "other" organ ... but it DIDN'T. And we were TOLD that he was engaged to MAKE it sound like the other organ.   I WISH I could remember where that organ was ... it was a small 3m (?) in the chapel of a large protestant church somewhere in the South (Texas?) ... the decor was Colonial, but that's all I remember about it. I would name the builder, but they're still in business, and I'm SURE they don't want their name associated with it (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Organs at Home From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 18:45:11 -0500   Actually, Tom, I don't think it's a "given" at all, assuming you have the space for a full size console. Obviously, unless you've got a healthy budget you're not going to have a brand new instrument sitting in the = living room, but there are plenty of long-lived electronics around for $1,000 or less. No, they are not state of the art--by a long stretch--but they can make adequate practice instruments. I was given an old Conn 2 manual several years ago, put about $200 in repairs and kept it for several years more before selling it to a beginning student for the same. The local AGO dean recommended the instrument to the girl, realizing that convenient practice at home was going to make for more progress than rare and inconvenient trips to the church. No, it didn't sound too hot, but it was cheap, reliable, and convenient.   The Church Organ Trader and other online lists regularly show cheapies.     Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God." ________________________________________________   It is a "given" that most of us cannot afford a small pipe organ or an AGO standard electronic substitute.   Tom Gregory      
(back) Subject: reed organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2002 16:56:16 -0700   Often the problem is inadequate wind ... I negotiated the purchase of a 2m Vocalion for a small mission that was determined NOT to have an electronic ... it came with a great noisy cement-mixer of a blower, and the key response was squishy at best ... but I could tell that with a releathered reservoir and an adequate blower it would be quite serviceable. Several years later I visited the church, and sure enough, with a good blower and the excellent acoustics of the room, it was quite nice.   I remember playing what undoubtedly ONCE was a nice 2m Mason & Hamlin, but the silly people had removed the RESERVOIR to get a blower into the console. The organ wheezed and gasped if more than two or three stops were drawn.   No, there's NOT a big variation in the sound (is there REALLY in most small electronics?), and most reed organs with the reed box directly under the keyboards DON'T have a great touch ... nor are they suitable for fast passage-work ... but if one collects HARMONIUM music, a lot of THAT is quite charming.   Vocalions had normal tracker action like a pipe organ, as the reed boxes were elevated in the case. The key action was virtually identical to a small tracker.   Cheers,   Bud